Category Archives: Weekly History

Idaho History Oct 17, 2021

Idaho 1918-1920 Influenza Pandemic

Part 76

Idaho Newspaper Clippings February 12-13, 1920

Idaho photos courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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February 12 (continued)

The Daily Star-Mirror., February 12, 1920, Page 1

19200212DSM1

19200212DSM2
Flu Conditions Show Improvement
But Health Officer Has Not Modified Restrictions On Meetings

The influenza situation is much improved, but no modifications of restrictive measures heretofore issued, have been made nor will they be made until the situation is far better than at present.

Our late Superintendent Rich, just preceding his fatal illness, told me that the pupils were so badly crippled in their grades on account of closing school last winter, that if they had to be closed for any length of time again, but few if any of the pupils could be graduated this year. And he therefore pleaded that I make the closing of the schools a last resort only.

The expense for books and clothing necessary to maintain a pupil in the school is so great that if the schools had to be closed for any length of time and pupils failed to graduate many of them might not be able to continue in school for another year, and even if they could go on the expenses to both the parents and the public maintaining teachers for an extra year would be very great. Therefore it will be my supreme effort to keep the schools going if I have to order every other business in town temporarily closed.

Only about 10 per cent of the population of Moscow have so far had the influenza. In my opinion, should the restrictions heretofore maintained be cast aside now, a far worse epidemic that that just coming under control might result with many deaths following, as later cases are much more severe than the first were and cases of pneumonia are becoming more numerous.

It has been my endeavor not to close lodges that meet only for a short time in small numbers for transaction of ordinary lodge business and until further notice said policy will be continued, but must be confined strictly to the local home office. No lodge will be permitted to bring in candidates from outside points for initiation in any Moscow lodge until public safety is further assured.

I regard the public welfare as superior to any social organization and as far as lies in my power, public interest will be my first consideration.

All social activities of [the] University have been forbidden, nothing but strictly University work will be permitted.

Dr. Leitch, City Health Officer
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Elks’ Initiation To Be Postponed
Legion Dance Is Also Cancelled At Request Of Health Officer

Much disappointment is manifested in Moscow today by a request that the Elks postpone their initiation of 40 candidates from Tekoa which was scheduled for Saturday night, and that the American Legion dance scheduled for Friday night. Both requests have been granted but there is considerable disappointment manifested.

Judge Edgar C. Steele, exalted ruler of the Elks lodge, said: “The Elks always bow to authority and have no wish to violate any rules or orders of authorized officials.” The date of the initiation will be announced later, for it is understood the Elks will not give up the big program planned for next Saturday night. It will simply be postponed.

The American Legion also announce that the request (it was not an order) will be complied with, but several members made it known in no uncertain terms that they feel that an injustice has been done and that while churches and schools and theatres are permitted to run it is an injustice to stop the Elks and the American Legion. An official of the Legion said:

“We could have held regular dances every week up to this time. We were the very first to cancel our dance after the hall had been paid for and the music secured. We did this voluntarily and held no dances while the situation was thought to be grave, but now that it has cleared up we felt there was no harm in having a dance. We know from whence the opposition came and will not forget it.”

That conditions are much better in Moscow is generally understood and there is almost a normal attendance at the schools and it was generally understood that the danger period had passed. The Elks had been preparing for six weeks for their big program for next Saturday night and it will be a big disappointment to many to have to cancel it at this late hour.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 12 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., February 12, 1920, Page 5

City News

Dr. G. M. Miller is ill at his home of influenza, as is also his son, Morey. Mrs. Miller’s mother is ill also but not with influenza. Little Morey has been quite ill for several weeks and has recently had an increased temperature.

Mrs. W. N. Elliott left today for Clayton, Wash., where she was called by the illness of her son’s family.

Mrs. M. Sprouse, who has just recovered from an attack of the “flu” left today for Spokane to visit her son, Carl.

Rev. L. W. Goss was called to Garfield yesterday on account of the illness of some of his parishioners.

Mrs. Ralph Brownlow as been seriously ill but at latest reports was improving.

Mrs. H. D. Smith, who has been seriously ill at her home on west A street is now reported as gradually improving in health.

Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Goetz of Viola are recovering after an attack of influenza.

Mrs. A. E. Foot, proprietor of the Pleasant Home, is very ill of pneumonia, following influenza. Her condition at present is slightly improved.

Mrs. C. L. Von Ende and two children have been released from quarantine after a siege of influenza.

A telegram was received yesterday from Caldwell, Idaho, stating that John Shepherd was very ill of influenza. His parents, Mr. and Mrs. George Shepherd of Howell, left at eight o’clock this morning to take care of their son. John Shepherd was a former student at the university.

Mrs. J. L. Miller, who left Moscow the last of the year and is visiting her daughter, in Seattle, writes that the weather is delightful on the coast with very little rain or fog. The early crocuses are in bloom and other early flowers are coming on. The “flu” has been bad there also but Mrs. Miller is well and enjoys receiving the Star-Mirror for the news from home.

(ibid, page 5)
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The Daily Star-Mirror., February 12, 1920, Page 6

Busy Blaine Precinct’s Weekly News Budget

Miss Anna Christenson returned to Moscow last Sunday to take up her school studies after a week’s vacation on account of the schools being closed.

Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Kroesing returned home last Wednesday after being in Moscow taking care of Gust Paulson and family who were all down with the flu. Olaf Paulson also took down with the flu while nursing his brother and family. He returned home last Saturday.

The Blaine vicinity has been very fortunate so far in not having any flu.
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Exalted Ruler Steele Addresses Moscow Elks

Brother Elks: — The Order of Elks always bows to constituted authority. We always support and defend the laws of our country. More than six weeks ago in order that applicants for membership from Tekoa who are engaged as conductors, engineers, brakemen, etc., on the railway might arrange for others to come from Portland and other points to resume their work while they were absent, the meeting for the initiation was arranged for February 14th. This arrangement was made long before any influenza was heard of. It now appears that the initiation can not be held. The next meeting will be on February 28th. Remember, however, that at our next meeting the exalted ruler will request the lodge to construct and maintain a swimming pool for the welfare of the men, women and children of Moscow.

Edgar C. Steele, Exalted Ruler.

(ibid, page 6)
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The Nezperce Herald., February 12, 1920, Page 1

19200212NH1

19200212NH2
Lid Is Lifted Activities Normal
Schools Resume Monday; Churches, Lodges, Picture Show, Public Gatherings as Usual — Flu Subsides

After two weeks under the ban as a precautionary measure against an influenza outbreak, the Nezperce community was yesterday released by order of County Health Officer Dr. E. Taylor, of Kamiah, who vised out city and expressed himself as well satisfied and gratified at health conditions as he found them here. While outside districts have suffered severely from the recent recurrence of influenza in the northwest, this community has been fortunate in the limited number of cases it had, which, with a few exceptions have been mild, and but one fatality resulted – that of Fred Maher, a well known young farmer of northeast of town – for which favorable condition the prompt elimination of public gatherings and attendant precautionary measures here are largely responsible.

The local doctors report all their flu patients recovered or nearly so and no new ones being heard from.

The Temple Theatre will open its doors tomorrow, Friday, night with a good bill and continue on its usual schedule of nightly shows and Sunday afternoon matinee. The lodges will resume regular meetings with the Odd Fellows’ opening tomorrow night. Regular services will be resumed at all of the churches next Sunday morning, and the schools will open Monday morning with a good prospect of a full attendance.

All lines of business are running as usual, and immediately after the lifting of the ban yesterday an increase in general activities was at once apparent.
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Local News

The Temple opens to-morrow night with a thriller.

The postoffice and the Nezperce phone have both been working shorthanded the past week, because of the Misses Rena and Clara Dahler having been called to their home at Stites by the serious illness of the home folks, who have the influenza. – Ilo Register.

Friday night’s bill at the Temple will help you forget the flu ban.

The ban has been lifted. Can’t the roads be dragged now? Yes, in town especially. What!!

The ban is off, the Temple opens Friday night with “The Moonshine Trail,” a picture you’ll remember.

Last week’s Free Press reported five deaths from influenza at Grangeville and vicinity in five days, but stated that though the malady had spread rapidly the preceding week, an abatement was then apparent and the outlook was steadily growing brighter.
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Central Ridge News

Mrs. Powell, the teachers, returned from Lewiston Saturday and school will start Wednesday at the Central Ridge school house.

Claude Parsons is reported quite sick with the flu.

Mrs. Longeteig was called to Southwick the latter part of the week to be at the bedside of her mother and brother, who have been quite ill with the flu.

Mrs. A. D. Hunter passed away Feb. 4 at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Wade Keine, in Spokane, following an attack of influenza. Mr. Hunter and son, Burton have been quite sick with the same ailment, but are reported to be much better now.

– Reporter.
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Liquor For Medical Purposes

The Bureau of Internal Revenue has just issued a statement relative to the regulations governing the use and procurement of intoxicating liquors for medicinal purposes.

Both the physician who prescribes the and pharmacist or druggist who sells liquor for medicinal purposes much have a permit. Application for the permits should be made to the Federal prohibition director. In states where prohibition directors have not been appointed, application should be made to the collector of internal revenue. In the case of residents of the District of Columbia application should be made to Collector of Internal Revenue Joshua W. Miles, Baltimore, Md.

Blank forms – 1403 – for prescribing liquors are being printed and distributed among Federal prohibition directors assistant directors and collectors of internal revenue. Where such blanks are not yet available, physicians holding permits may issue prescriptions on blanks regularly used by them.

Following is the Bureau’s statement:

“Any physician duly licensed to practice medicine and actively engaged in the practice of such profession may obtain a permit to prescribe intoxicating liquor and may then issue prescriptions for distilled spirits, wines or certain alcoholic medicinal preparations for medical purposes for persons upon whom his in attendance in cases where he believes that the use of liquor as a medicine is necessary. In no case may spirituous liquor be prescribed by one or more physicians in excess of one pint for the same person within any period of ten days.

“No specific limitation is placed upon the quantity of wines which may be prescribed for medical purposes. The regulations merely require that no prescription be issued for a greater quantity than is necessary for use as a medicine. Physicians who do not hold permits to prescribe intoxicating liquor are under no circumstances permitted to issue prescriptions.

“All prescriptions for intoxicating liquor are required to be written on prescription blanks prescribed by the regulations (Form 1403), and to be provided by the Bureau, except that in emergency cases physicians may use their regular prescription blanks provided the same contain the date of issue, amount prescribed, to whom issued, and directions for use, stating the amount and frequency of dose.Pending an adequate supply of the official blanks being printed and distributed to directors and acting directors, physicians holding permits have been authorized to issue prescriptions on blanks regularly used by them.

“Prescriptions for intoxicating liquor may be filled only by registered pharmacists who hold permits authorizing them to do so, or who are employed by retail druggists holding such permits. Pharmacists and druggists holding such permits will procure their supplies of intoxicating liquor from manufacturer or other persons holding permits authorizing them to sell liquor.

“Persons to whom prescriptions for intoxicating liquor are issued by physicians may procure the liquor prescribed through pharmacists or druggists holding permits without obtaining a permit.

“Physicians may also obtain permits entitling them to procure not more than six quarts of distilled spirits, wines or certain alcoholic preparations during any calendar year for administration to their patients in emergency cases where delay in procuring liquor on a prescription through a pharmacist might have serious consequence to the patient.

“Provision is also made in the regulations for issuing permits to hospitals and sanatoriums to enable them to procure intoxicating liquor to be administered for medicinal purposes to patients at such institutions and also for issuing permits to manufacturing industrial, and other establishments maintaining first aid stations, authorizing them to procure liquor for administration to their employees for medical purposes in emergency cases.

“All applications for permits above referred to should be made on Form 1404 in triplicate and forwarded to the local Collector of Internal Revenue.

“Section 27 of the National Prohibition Act provides that any intoxicating liquor seized under section 25 or section 26 thereof, and subject to be destroyed, may upon application of the United States Attorney, be ordered by the court to be delivered to any person holding a permit to purchase liquor. All liquor seized under such sections of law may be diverted through regular channels for medicinal purposes under the procedure above described.

“Any intoxicating liquor seized under Federal Law prior to October 28, 1919, if not claimed within sixty days from such date, may likewise upon order of the court be delivered to any person holding a permit to purchase and be diverted to medicinal or other non-beverage purposes.”

source: The Nezperce Herald. (Nezperce, Idaho), 12 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.

1918RxWhiskeyFritz-a

“A prescription from December 1918, in [the] middle of Spanish Influenza pandemic. This doctor/drug store was in Malad, Idaho. But this was common across the U.S. at this time. Also, was a legal way to get alcohol during prohibition.”

courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection
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The Nezperce Herald., February 12, 1920, Page 7

Local and Personal News Notes

Miss Ruth Denny, who is attending school in Winchester, is visiting her grandparents and other Nezperce relatives this week, while the Winchester schools are closed because of influenza.

(ibid, page 7)
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Idaho County Free Press. February 12, 1920, Page 1

19200212ICFP1

19200212ICFP2Ban On Public Gatherings Will Be Lifted Saturday

Believing danger of spread of Spanish influenza is past, the city board of health will, effective probably Saturday, rescind the order which for two weeks has kept pool halls, the schools, and picture show closed and has forbidden all public gatherings in Grangeville.

With not a death from influenza in Grangeville or vicinity in more than a week, and with a gradual release of individual families from quarantine, as cases are discharged by physicians, the board of health decided closing order no longer is necessary. The public schools, it is announced, will reopen on Monday. The matter was discussed at a meeting of the board of education last Monday night, and it was decided, if the situation continued to improve, the schools would resume the first of the week.

Physicians report there are few cases of influenza in Grangeville. The epidemic has reached its crest in the country districts, and now is on the wane.
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Peterson Improving

J. A. Peterson, acting postmaster who has been confined to his home for two weeks by severe illness, is improving, and now is able to be about the house.
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Funeral For Mrs. Seay; Hold Service At Grave

Funeral for Mrs. Mary Edith Seay, wife of Thomas H. Seay, of Winona, was held last Friday morning from the Maugg parlors, with services, in charge of the Rev. H. S. Randall, at the grave in Prairie View cemetery. Mrs. Seay died in Clarkston, Wn., of pneumonia, resulting from influenza.

Mrs. Seay, who was a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James E. Barton, of Winona, was born on May 12, 1890 near Gravette, Ark. When she was 6 years old she removed with her parents to Oklahoma, where she resided until 1910, when the family came to Idaho, locating near Winona.

She was married on Jan. 17, 1912, to Thomas H. Seay. To them were born two children, Thomas Champ, age 7, and an infant son, 3 days old at the time of his mother’s death.

Besides her husband and children Mrs. Seay is survived by her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Barton; three sisters and five brothers, Mrs. H. P. Leonard, Winona; Miss Bertha Barton, Lewiston; Rodney, Albert, Ervin, Arlie, Melvin and Ailene, all at home, and by two half-brothers, William Barton, of Oklahoma, and John Barton, of Winona.

Her sister, Miss Bertha Barton, was with Mrs. Seay at the time of her death.
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Mrs. Charles Mader, Keuterville, Dead

Mrs. Charles Mader, aged about 45 years, died on Wednesday of last week in her home in the Keuterville section. Death was caused by influenza. Mrs. Mauder is survived by her husband and eight children. Funeral was held Thursday from the Catholic [church.]

source: Idaho County Free Press. (Grangeville, Idaho), 12 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Idaho County Free Press. February 12, 1920, Page 5

Whitebird

(Special Correspondence)

Otto Nail and family have returned from Lewiston, where Mr. Nail had been seriously ill with influenza for the last two weeks.

Mr. Dumond who has been nursing influenza cases here for the last month has accepted a job as a ranch hand on the farm of Seth Jones.

Mr. Hughs, the new superintendent of the Whitebird schools, will be here as soon as he receives word that the school will start, which will perhaps be on February 16.

The influenza epidemic is dying out here.

(ibid, page 5)
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Idaho County Free Press. February 12, 1920, Page 6

Local News In Brief

Catholic Services — No services in the Catholic church in Grangeville until Sunday, February 22.

Federated Church — After consultation with several, that we may be absolutely safe, with all fear gone, it is decided not to begin services until Sunday, February 22. Let us all be ready and see that everybody is out one week from Sunday. Sunday school papers can be obtained by calling at Mrs. Morris’ home. H. S. Randall, pastor.
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Card Of Thanks

We wish to sincerely thank our friend for the kindly and sympathy extended to us during the illness and death of our beloved husband and father.

We wish to especially thank the Odd Fellow lodge at Winona.

Mrs. G. D. Stanbery and children.
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Personal

John Pulse, who was confined to his home for ten days by an attack of influenza, is again able to be about.

Israel Harris was called to Burbank, Wn., owing to illness in the family of his daughter, Mrs. H. C. Gee. Mr. Harris had just recovered from an attack of influenza.

Bert Decker was in town Wednesday from his ranch on the prairie. Mr. Decker has just recovered from an attack of influenza, which kept him at home for two weeks.

(ibid, page 6)
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The Emmett Index. February 12, 1920, Page 1

19200212EI1

19200212EI2
Epidemic Subsiding

Indications are that the so-called influenza epidemic here has spent its force and is subsiding. The two patients in the Red Cross emergency hospital are convalescent and were discharged today. The rooms were turned back to the Masonic lodge this afternoon. The nurses were augmented yesterday by Mrs. R. E. Noland and daughter of Montour. Mrs. Noland was assigned to take care of an appendicitis patient at the Russell hotel. Mrs. Noland had just returned from nursing her son Eugene and Tom Patten, who were stricken with the flu, at Deer Flat. They are both well now.

source: The Emmett Index. (Emmett, Idaho), 12 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Emmett Index. February 12, 1920, Page 5

Maybe the Next Batch of Pets Will Be Skunks

Portchester, N. Y. — It will not be possible to keep goats in tenement houses hereafter if the board of health has its way. After pigs were barred from dwellings during the influenza epidemic last fall, families adopted goats as pets. According to Sanitary Inspector Bitz, the animals are kept on second, third and even fourth floors. He suggests that they be licensed, the same as dogs.

(ibid, page 5)
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The Emmett Index. February 12, 1920, Page 7

News Of Gem County
By The Index’s Correspondents

Bramwell

Mrs. Will King and two children, Mrs. Storey and Sarah, have had the flu in a mild form, but are all better at this time.

Mrs. Will Bethel went to Caldwell last Thursday to help care for her sister, Mrs. O’Donald, who has been very sick with the flu. Mr. Bethel says there will be more sickness if she doesn’t return soon; that he has eaten his own cooking about as long as he can stand it. The sick one is improving.

Bissell Creek

Mrs. Helena Muzzy of Payette is helping with the cooking at the James Howard home.

Central Mesa

Wendell Seaman has the flu.

Mrs. Henry Conrad spent several days of last week at the Fager home nursing flu patients.

Mrs. B. L. Limbaugh is on the sick list this week.

The Fred Sherwood baby died Saturday of the flu, was buried Sunday afternoon. The child was only four weeks old.

Ola

Mrs. L. S. Park is recovering from a hard siege of the grippe.

Joel Potter is just recovering from the flu.

Mrs. Richardson and daughter Elsie are on the sick list this week.

Harry Foster is on the sick list this week.

There have been three mad dogs killed here this winter, at least they acted like they had rabies.

South Slope

Mrs. Frank Shinn, Sr., formerly of the Slope, now a resident of Seattle, Wash., is reported very low with pneumonia with very little hope entertained for her recovery.

The Ed Modin family will soon be out of quarantine, having a light form of smallpox.

Mrs. Bert Wright is one of the grip victims this week.

Hanna

The Ed Beutler family on the Big 4 have been quite seriously ill for the past week.

The little daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jack Norwood has been quite sick for several days.

The program which the teachers and pupils have been planning to put on Friday evening has been postponed for a few weeks, hoping by that time there will be less illness prevailing and consequently less danger in calling a crowd together.

Little Wayman Guthrie has been quite ill the past week with an attack of pneumonia, but is improving nicely.

(ibid, page 7)
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The Emmett Index. February 12, 1920, Page 10

Letha

A. E. Pomeroy is having his turn with the flu. Dr. Polly is attending him and he is better.

The school teacher and children have been greatly annoyed by a smoking stove which finally drove the children and teacher home Wednesday. After several attempts it has finally been put into shape.

U. S. Census Enumerator Mr. Wells was working in Letha Wednesday.
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Died

Mryl Frank Washburn, the 5-months-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Ed Washburn, died Saturday night of pneumonia. The funeral was held at the Bucknum chapel Sunday afternoon and services were conducted by Rev. A. C. Lathrop.

Mrs. Thelma Wilbur Holm, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Perry Wilbur, died Saturday at her home at Carbarton, aged 18 years. Death was caused by mumps with influenza complications. Mrs. Holm spent the greater portion of her life in Emmett, attended the Emmett high school and was a member of the Christian church. She was united in marriage to Mr. Holm last August at the home of her parents in Long Valley. She is survived, beside her parents, by two sisters, two brothers, and two grandmothers, Mrs. Wilbur and Mrs. Callendar Corbin. The body was brought to Emmett for burial and the funeral was held Tuesday from the chapel, the services being in charge of Rev. A. C. Lathrop.

Mazie M. Marker, 14-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Marker of 604 South Fifteenth street, died at a local hospital late Saturday evening following a prolonged illness. She is survived by her parents, five brothers and one sister. Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock. — Statesman.

(ibid, page 10)
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The Filer Record., February 12, 1920, Page 1

19200412FR1

19200412FR2Influenza Shows Little Increase In Past Week

The influenza situation locally remains about the same as last week. Several new cases have been reported but there have been no fatalities here.

W. A. Doyel, superintendent of the grade schools reports that attendance is regaining normal figures and that the epidemic among school children is much better.

The influenza situation throughout the country is very much the same as last week, there being about 20 new cases reported every day.
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19200412FR3
Club Dinner Postponed

The Filer Womans Club dinner scheduled to be held tomorrow (Friday) evening has been postponed indefinitely on account of the health situation.
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Robbers’ Loot Makes Rich Haul For Rancher

W. A. Snyder has made a deposit at the First National bank of a rather unusual nature – unusual for this period in this section.

The deposit is in the nature of eight small bars of silver bullion representing an accidental discovery of what is presumed to be robbers’ buried loot and a reminder of old stagecoach days in Idaho.

Snyder is a farmer in the district about Antelope Springs, west of Rogerson, and not far from the Salmon dam. He had occasion to build a residence at Antelope Springs and while digging for the basement encountered the booty almost four feet below the surface.

Telling of the discovery Mr. Snyder says he was picking and the implement suddenly sank into a hole, revealing the presence of two silver bars. Investigation revealed the presence of six other similar bars and a quantity of decayed wood, suggesting that the bars had at one time been enclosed in a box and buried.

Mr. Snyder is of the impression that the bars form a part of the loot from a stagecoach holdup, the robbers burying the treasure and failing to locate it when they wanted it or perhaps being captured before they could return to the cache. The value of the bars has not been fully determined. The represent a neat sum but not a fortune. — Twin Falls News

source: The Filer Record. (Filer, Idaho), 12 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Filer Record., February 12, 1920, Page 11

19200412FR4
Death Rate Highest in 1918

Washington. — The highest death rate on record in the United States census bureau, 18 per 1000 population, was recorded in 1918, according to a bulletin issued Saturday. The total was 1,471,367 deaths.

(ibid, page 11)
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Fred’s Place, Warm River, Idaho (4)

WarmRiverFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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February 13

The Rathdrum Tribune., February 13, 1920, Page 1

19200213RT1

19200213RT2
Flu Ban Pending
Rathdrum People Must Help Fight Epidemic

The Rathdrum trustees, at their meeting Tuesday night, considered and took under advisement the request of the school board that an influenza ban be declared.

However, the board voted to immediately warn, by means of dodgers, all persons in town to take such precautions as common sense and good citizenship dictate to prevent the spread of influenza. In this dodger it is insisted that while the epidemic is so prevalent in neighboring communities, unnecessary visits out of town must be discouraged, that no dances be given, and that persons sick with colds or influenza must remain at their homes and report their illness without delay to the village board or the doctor. Parents are urged to keep their children under restraint in cooperation with the school teachers. Dances are prohibited. Failure to observe these precautions will cause a strict ban to be put on with police employed and severe quarantine penalties invoked.

The chairman suggested that the school board consider a plan to have the teachers report to the clerk the names of absent pupils so that the cause of absence might be investigated and homes quarantined if necessary.

It developed during the meeting that one or two cases of influenza in town appeared to have been kept secret and that callers, unwarned, were exposed to possible infection.

Other business transacted included authorizing a notice to dog owners to pay the 1920 license to the clerk on or before March 1.

A number of citizens were present at the meeting and manifested a pleasing interest by joining in the discussion of civic matters. It was made evident that a movement is on foot to fence the park.

A few bills were allowed:

E. W. Cady, care of smallpox patients $14
Tribune, water receipts $15
F. G. Hart, bandmaster for Jan. $10
Rathdrum Elec. Co. Jan. light $79 50
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From Over The County

Post Falls

School was closed last week on account of the flu, 100 cases being reported one day. The Hauser Lake school was closed for the same reason. Church services in Post Falls were dispensed with last Sunday.

Families around Hauser lake reported last week as being ill with the flu were the Andersons, Wrights, J. Bauers and Lansings.

The East Greenacres school board has combined the two rooms instead of hiring a new teacher, and Miss Martin is in charge of all grades.

Spirit Lake

Dances announced for Feb. 12 and 16 were postponed as a precaution against the spread of influenza.

On account of colds and the epidemic, about 65 pupils were absent from school last week.

Spirit Lake high school defeated Newport in a game of basket ball.

Up to the close of last week the census enumerator had not appeared in Spirit Lake.

Harrison

No cases of flu up to the close of last week. However, the city health board placed a ban on dances and public gatherings except such as are necessary to complete programs under way. Church services continue as usual.

Coeur D’Alene

George H. Freedlander, age 45, died Feb 8, of pneumonia following influenza. Mr. Freedlander, who was ill about a week, occupied a prominent place in the business community, being city clerk, president of the St. Joe Boom company, secretary treasurer of the log owners’ association and manager of the Coeur d’Alene Lumber company. He was a resident of this city for the last 16 years, except for a short time when he was in charge of banks at Harrison and St. Joe. He leaves his widow and two sons.

The board of health Feb. 8 issued an order, effective Monday morning, forbidding all public gatherings and closing motion picture houses, lodges, churches and pool halls and discouraging the congregation of people at any place. The order is due to the spread of influenza. The order also closes the city public schools.

The influenza placard is not in the future to be a useless warning, but that any person quarantined in the house must remain there and anyone entering the home must remain there until the card is removed by the proper health officers and any infraction of this ruling will meet with severe punishment.

Saturday the county physician ordered that no more public dances be held in Kootenai county until further notice.

Mae Hodge, wife of Claude Hodge, who died in Spokane of pneumonia, following influenza, was buried at Coeur d’Alene Tuesday.
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Idaho State News Items

The school at Hope were closed on account of the smallpox epidemic.

The public schools of Lewiston reopened Monday after an intermission of two weeks because of the influenza epidemic.

Announcement that there will be no general extension of time for filing income tax returns has been made by the bureau of internal revenue. Complete returns, accompanied by at least one fourth of the amount of the tax due must be in the hands of collectors of internal revenue on or before March 15. Extensions will be granted only in specific cases where urgent need for additional time in preparing the return is shown.

source: The Rathdrum Tribune. (Rathdrum, Idaho), 13 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Rathdrum Tribune., February 13, 1920, Page 2

[Editorials]

However lightly some may be disposed to think of the influenza epidemic, its ravages in neighboring cities and towns fully prove that it is not a disease to which any citizen should needlessly expose himself or which he should carelessly communicate to others. While Rathdrum has been, so far, surprisingly free from the scourge, its virulence in Spokane and its sudden outburst in Coeur d’Alene after smoldering apparently harmless for two weeks, should give ample warning that no individual here should neglect such precautions as he may be able to take to avoid infection. For the time being the local authorities have placed the control of the situation in the hands of each individual citizen. It is the hope of all that the trust will not prove to have been misplaced.
— —

Under federal prohibition, spirituous liquor may be prescribed by the physician in attendance only “in cases where he believes the use of liquor as a medicine is necessary.” To the further sorrow of the erstwhile bibulous, the statute limits the prescription to one pine in point of quantity and ten days in point of time.

(ibid, page 2)
— — — —

The Rathdrum Tribune., February 13, 1920, Page 3

Personal Mention

Mrs. H. A. Knox was pronounced ill with influenza several days ago.

Nels Nelson and family are about again after a week’s tussle with bad colds or lagrippe.

Mrs. C. I. Sage was called to Lewiston by the illness of her mother.

W. S. Gill was confined to his home a few days last week with a severe cold which he caught while pruning an orchard.

Miss Edna Stoddard, teacher in the school at Denver, was released from influenza quarantine yesterday morning.

Earle R. Bosworth was absent from his work in Farnsworth’s garage several days last week while engaged in fighting off a threatened attack of pneumonia.

Dewet Bradbury has returned from the University of Idaho and states he will not resume his course there until fall. He says the flu has interfered a little with the work at the U.

Dr. F. Wenz, who is kept unusually busy on account of the epidemic, has been attending patients as far west as Moab, Wash., and east as far as Bayview, despite the bad condition of the roads. He has used a railroad speeder to reach Bayview.
— —

Local Paragraphs

The Odd Fellows lodge will have a regular meeting this evening, Feb. 13. Third degree to confer and routine business to transact.

The usual Saturday picture show will be given at the Star theatre tomorrow night, with a feature film to lead the program. There will be no dance, the management announces, and efforts will be made to have the theater well ventilated.

The McAlberts show, of Spokane, had to cancel its engagement at the Star the last three nights of this week because of the sudden illness of a leading performer, according to a telephone message from Spokane Wednesday morning. Mr. McAlberts expects to bring his show to Rathdrum in the near future.

An airplane coming from the east circled over Rathdrum last Saturday afternoon and headed into the clouds towards the south.
— —

School Board Meeting

At the regular meeting Monday night the Rathdrum board of education placed restriction on teachers and school students visiting out of town while influenza is prevalent in neighboring communities. It was ordered that teachers or students leaving town be required to remain away five days before returning. The board also appointed a committee to convey to the village trustees the recommendation of the school authorities that a ban of two or three weeks be placed on all unnecessary public and social gatherings in Rathdrum, until danger of spreading influenza shall have passed.

Some routine business was transacted including the allowing of the expense bills to the amount of $266.41, including $132 for wood.

(ibid, page 3)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Oakley Herald. February 13, 1920, Page 1

19200213OH1

Locals

Mrs. Alma Butler of Basin died yesterday morning from pneumonia following influenza.
— —

A Few Announcements

We want to explain why certain articles were not printed last week. The reason is that the editor was sick in bed and his assistants did not have time to set up all the good articles that were received.

We hope the correspondents will keep on sending in the news. The editor promises not to get sick again if he can help it.

source: The Oakley Herald. (Oakley, Idaho), 13 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Oakley Herald. February 13, 1920, Page 3

Locals

Henry Tanner is out again after an illness with lagrippe.

The family of Clarence Tanner has been sick this week.

Principal Joseph Mills is improving after and attack of lagrippe.
— —

Boulder

Paul Yacoby has been very sick, but is much better.

H. P. Nelson and four of his children are recovering from an attack of flu.

The school has been closed the last week on account of the illness of the teacher and pupils.

Mrs. Albert Anderson has received a telegram, saying that her brother-in-law at Cascade has died of the flu.

Miss Nancy Frost has returned from Paul to help take care of the sick people at her home. The entire family has been sick.

(ibid, page 3)
— — — —

The Oakley Herald. February 13, 1920, Page 6

In The Gem State

In “wet” days Boise numbered on her police force from twenty to twenty-five men. The present force is an exact dozen.

Institution of a meat and abattoir inspection department, as part of the municipal administration, has been authorized by the city council at Twin Falls.

Equipped with apparatus of the latest design, a hospital is to be instituted in Burley, according to authoritative information. It will occupy the entire upper floor of the new Pixley building.

An ordinance which will be voted upon at the next meeting of the Nampa city council will provide severe penalties for the people living in the city who permit debris to accumulate on their property.

Employers of child labor must pay 10 per cent of their net income to the federal government. Sam J. Hindman, chief field deputy in the officer of Lewis Williams, revenue collector announced last week.

The Central Idaho Antlers’ association, made up chiefly of members of the B. P. O. E. of southern Idaho, will transfer before spring forty elk from the Jackson Hole country to the Copper Basin near Mackay. The transportation will cost approximately $1000 which cost will be born by the association.
— —

Senator Johnson Flu Victim

Washington — Senator Hiram Johnson of California is ill at his home here from influenza, it has been learned. The senator has been confined to his bed, but it is not believed his condition is serious.

(ibid, page 6)
— — — —

The Oakley Herald. February 13, 1920, Page 8

Vipont News

Lagrippe or Flu epidemic has slowed up a bit in camp lately – about 30 cases so far.

An order was issued Feb. 1st, placing Vipont on the map.

The question is: Who is to be our post master or post mistress?

(ibid, page 8)
—————

Further Reading

What Was ‘La Grippe’?

Andre Lorenz Oct 05, 2015 Wittenberg University

1918LaGrippe-a

“La Grippe” was the name used for the Spanish Flu. This flu had three waves in the United States and led to 50 to 100 million deaths across the globe. Not only that, but it is also estimated that the infectious disease infected one in every three people at the time, or around 500 million.

One of the big problems with the disease was that it was highly virulent, meaning that it had a high capability of causing disease. In America alone, there were half a million deaths. Compare that to World War I, when the U.S. only had 116,516 casualties. The disease had enough of an impact that the kids made up a rhyme to go with their jump-rope game for it:

I had a little bird,
Its name was Enza.
I opened the window,
And in-flu-enza.

Even the president could not escape the disease, although it is not for certain that this was the pathogen he contracted. It was during the Peace Conference for World War I that Wilson became sick with the pathogen and would need to sit out of the negotiations.

Although the name has “Spanish” in it, it was not believed to have originated in Spain, but that was where a lot of deaths happened. However, there was an early beginning to the disease reported in U.S. military camps. One physician at Fort Devons said in September 1918:

“This epidemic started about four weeks ago and has developed so rapidly that the camp is demoralized and all ordinary work is held up till it has passed. … These men start with what appears to be an ordinary attack of LaGrippe or Influenza, and when brought to the Hosp. they very rapidly develop the most viscous type of Pneumonia that has ever been seen. Two hours after admission they have the Mahogany spots over the cheek bones, and a few hours later you can begin to see the Cyanosis extending from their ears and spreading all over the face, until it is hard to distinguish the coloured men from the white. It is only a matter of a few hours then until death comes, and it is simply a struggle for air until they suffocate. It is horrible. One can stand it to see one, two or twenty men die, but to see these poor devils dropping like flies sort of gets on your nerves. We have been averaging about 100 deaths per day, and still keeping it up. There is no doubt in my mind that there is a new mixed infection here, but what I don’t know.”

The disease began in 1918 and ended in 1919, although there have been variants of the pathogen since then. In such a short time, the disease had a large impact and created a lot of fear in the world. People had just ended an attack on themselves, and soon this was replaced by a disease that would instill fear and bring a devastating amount of death again. The Spanish Flu had a large impact compared to its relatively short time in the news and how little information there truly is on the disease. In 1998, pathologist Johan Hultin told Time magazine the way to survive another such epidemic is to “isolate yourself in a mountain hideaway until the outbreak subsides.”

source: The Odyssey Online
————-

Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 1)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 2)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 3)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 4)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 5)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 6)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 7)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 8)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 9)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 10)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 11)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 12)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 13)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 14)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 15)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 16)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 17)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 18)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 19)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 20)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 21)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 22)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 23)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 24)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 25)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 26)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 27)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 28)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 29)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 30)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 31)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 32)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 33)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 34)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 35)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 36)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 37)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 38)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 39)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 40)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 41)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 42)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 43)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 44)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 45)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 46)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 47)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 48)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 49)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 50)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 51)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 52)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 53)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 54)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 55)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 56)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 57)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 58)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 59)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 60)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 61)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 62)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 63)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 64)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 65)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 66)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 67)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 68)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 69)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 70)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 71)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 72)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 73)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 74)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 75)

Idaho History Oct 10, 2021

Idaho 1918-1920 Influenza Pandemic

Part 75

Idaho Newspaper Clippings February 11-12, 1920

Idaho photos courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

February 11

The Challis Messenger., February 11, 1920, Page 1

19200211CM1

19200211CM2Quarantine Established Wednesday Evening, Feb. 4th
Mail Service Discontinued For Two Days
Postoffice Department Denies Knowledge of any Such Order to Mackay Postmaster. Local Postmaster Received no Order to Hold Outgoing Mail But Contractor Hansen Failed to Take Mail Out One Morning.

Last Wednesday evening a quarantine was established at Willow creek summit against infected districts and as a result the people of the entire Salmon river section of Custer county were with outmail for two days.

On Thursday morning the editor called up Mackay postmaster W. A. Criswell and was informed by him that he had received instructions from the Postoffice Department at Washington on February 2nd (two days before the quarantine was established) to withhold all Challis mail until quarantine was lifted. A meeting of business men was held and the following telegram was sent to the Department at Washington:

“Mackay postmaster claims order from Department to withhold all Challis mail. Challis section under quarantine AGAINST influenza, effective February 4th at 6 p.m. Uninterrupted service last year under same conditions. County Health Officer Recommends mail service be continued at once and has made no request for its discontinuance. This district is NOT infected. C. L. Kirtley Health Officer, Custer County.”

On Friday afternoon telegraphic advices from Washington informed us that the Mackay postmaster had been ordered to release the Challis mail at once and Saturday evening we received mail which had been held up at Mackay for approximately 66 hours.

Local postmaster E. W. Keyes, informed the contractor’s agent here that she had no orders to withhold outgoing mail, but despite this fact the contractor. W. V. Hansen, neglected to take the mail out one morning and Friday evening a committee of citizens called on our postmaster and asked that she take the necessary steps to have the mail leave here Saturday morning. Mrs. Keyes called up the contractor at Makay and insisted that the mail leave according to schedule the next (Saturday) morning. Mr. Hansen, whom we are informed, had withdrawn all his stage equipment used on the Mackay route except one truck, instructed his local stage agent, Nickerson, to get the mail out next morning. Thus we were deprived of our incoming mail service two days and the outbound service one day, causing great inconvenience to the citizens of not only this valley, but of Pahsamaroi and the upper country as well.

Last Monday afternoon the following telegram to Dr. Kirtley was received:

“Immediately upon receipt of your telegram took matter up with postoffice service authorities and was advised that postmaster at Mackay had no orders from here to withhold Challis mail. I was assured that he would be communicated with and erroneous impression corrected. Have not heard further from you so assume that service has been restored.”

We are, for sufficient reasons, withholding the signature on this telegram, but the same can be seen upon request.

Interfering with Uncle Sam’s mail service is a serious offense and an endeavor to fix the guilt upon any person or persons responsible for the discontinuance of our mail service is being made so we are informed and a complaint and warrants will be sworn out against those found to be responsible and the matter pushed to a finish.

Such an effort is child’s play – Ouija board stuff – and is extremely ridiculous as anyone, who would give the matter any thought would readily see that the Postoffice Department would not discontinue mail service into a district which was not infected unless the residents there demanded it.
— —

19200211CM3Many Cases Of Flu In Our County

An epidemic of flu is raging in various sections of Custer county.

At Mackay 30 cases are reported and we are informed that others cases are known to exist there which have not been reported by the doctor in charge.

At White Knob the epidemic is said to be raging. Some cases are reported at Barton and near Chilly and several cases are reported near Clayton and in Pahsamaroi.

A quarantine has been established at the Wats bridge and that road will be open to travel only between the hours of 8 a.m. and 10 p.m.

There are no cases of flu in Round valley at the present time, although Bill Vogel is under quarantine on suspicion.

Dr. Kirtley has done remarkably well in keeping the epidemic out of this valley when we are hemmed in with the disease on all sides.

Bert Williams, who has been critically ill with the flu at the Ramshorn mine is reported as on the improve now while Roy Tracht is reported as seriously ill.

By everyone carefully adhering to the quarantine regulations the epidemic will soon be under control and the disease stamped out.

source: The Challis Messenger. (Challis, Idaho), 11 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Challis Messenger., February 11, 1920, Page 2

Idahoan Has Long Sleep

Buhl, Idaho. — Bernard Sandgren, 23 years of age, son of Mr. and Mrs. M. Sandgren, residing a mile north of this city, has been in a somnambulant state of mind since January 20, following an attack of influenza.

(ibid, page 2)
— — — —

The Challis Messenger., February 11, 1920, Page 5

Items About People You Know

To Pahsamaroi — Dr. Kirtley went over to Pahsamaroi the later part of the week for a conference with Dr. Hanmer, county physician for Lemhi county relative to the flu situation. Dr. Hanmer assured Dr. Kirtley that the board of health of Lemhi county, and he, as its executive official, were heartily in accord with our quarantine and that the county commissioners of Lemhi county had instructed him to use every effort to keep the disease out of Salmon this year. We are not, it seems, entirely alone in our desire for a rigid quarantine against infected districts.

Taking Census — J. A. Hirrington and J. L. Riley began last Monday to count noses for Uncle Sam in the Salmon river section of Custer county.

(ibid, page 5)
— — — —

The Challis Messenger., February 11, 1920, Page 8

19200211CM4Quarantine Regulations
County Health Officer

To the Public Generally;

Whereas a contagious and infectious disease, known as Influenza has again made its appearance in many states and particularly in certain parts of Custer county, public health demands that prompt and efficient measures be taken to prevent the spread of said disease to those portions of Custer county not yet infected.

1st. Now, therefore, it is ordered by the County Health Officer of Custer county that all of that portion of Custer county which drains into Salmon River shall and is hereby declared to be a quarantine district for the purpose of preventing the introduction of Influenza into the said district. Said quarantine district and this order creating the same shall remain in full force until the further order of the Board of Health of said Custer county, Idaho.

2nd. All persons are prohibited from entering said district without a permit from the County Health Officer.

3rd. The County Health Officer is hereby authorized and empowered to appoint as many quarantine guards and to create as many quarantine districts as may be necessary to enforce these rules and regulations.

4th. The County Health Officer of Custer County, Idaho, shall cause to be printed suitable permits and quarantine cards in harmony with law and these regulations and place a sufficient number of said permits and quarantine cards at each quarantine station with the quarantine guards stationed there to meet all such necessary demands. It is hereby and herein further ordered and directed that the County Health Officer shall provide all quarantine guards at each quarantine station with “yellow flags” of suitable size, to be used by said quarantine guards in placing or causing same to be placed on the vehicle in which said person or persons are traveling.

5th. All persons coming into said district and desiring to remain therein shall be quarantined for a period of four days, at the home of such person or persons, in case they have a home in said district, and if not, then in some suitable place prepared and designated by the County Health Officer.

6th. All persons have business to transact in said district may enter said district and attend to [?] business, and depart again from said district; but all homes or other places to which such person are allowed to stop and enter must be quarantined for a period of four days; such person or persons so entering under the provisions of this [Order?] shall stop at the first quarantine station on the road [?], that such person or persons enter said quarantine district, and procure a written permit therefor; said permit shall direct such person or persons to travel the most direct public highway to and from his or her, or their homes or place where they seek to go, without stopping; and that each home of place where such person or persons shall go or stop, shall be quarantined by the placing of a proper quarantine card up in a conspicuous place on said residence or place where such person or persons shall go or stop as aforesaid; said quarantine card shall be applied such person or persons by said quarantine, such quarantine to be and remain in full force and effect for a period of four days from and after such person or persons shall so enter as aforesaid; and in the event any such person or persons or others in said home shall become afflicted with said disease, then in such case, said quarantine of said home or place shall be and remain in full force and virtue until ordered discontinued by said County Health Officer. It is further hereby and herein provided that all persons entering said quarantine district as aforesaid, shall place in a conspicuous place on the vehicle in which they travel a “yellow flag” and keep said flag thereon for a period of four days provided they remain in said quarantine district for such period of time; said flag to be supplied by the quarantine guard.

7th. All persons desiring continuous passage through said district shall be granted such privilege, but such person or persons shall first procure from such quarantine guard a permit and flag therefor, and all homes and other places in which they may be permitted to stop and enter shall be quarantined for a period of four days, as provided in Rule Sixth hereof.

8th. The County Health Officer is hereby empowered and directed to cause to be printed large quarantine cards to be posted up in a conspicuous place at each quarantine station so created as aforesaid, which said quarantine card shall correctly describe the boundaries of the Quarantine District hereby created.

9th. Every person or persons, company or corporation violating any of the provisions of this Order will be prosecuted as in such case made and provided.

An emergency existing therefore, this Order shall be and is in full force and effect from the date hereof.

Penalty for violation of this Order is $50.00 fine or imprisonment in the county jail for ninety days or by both such fine and imprisonment.

Dated at Challis, Idaho, this 4th day of February, 1920.

(ibid, page 8)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., February 11, 1920, Page 1

19200211DSM1

Anniversary Week Of The Boy Scouts

This week is the tenth anniversary of the organization of the Boy Scouts of America and National Good Turn week. Many of the big magazines are giving space to the Scout Good Turn and with them we are urging that everybody do at least one good turn to some one else this week.

The Moscow Boy Scouts have been delayed in their anniversary week plans on account of the influenza but as far as conditions will allow they intend to carry out the program. …
— —

Glee Club Concert Has Been Postponed

Due to the influenza quarantine now in effect at the University of Idaho and the illness of Russell T. Scott, manager and baritone soloist, who is suffering with influenza, the much looked for University of Idaho Male Glee club concert to have been held in the auditorium Friday night has been indefinitely postponed until health conditions are better.

After a triumphant tour of southern Idaho where the club concerts were greeted with crowded and enthusiastic houses, the Friday night concert was looked forward to with considerable pleasure.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 11 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., February 11, 1920, Page 2

Princeton Pickings

Miss Lavalle Cone came home from Moscow Monday. She will remain at home here until she entirely recovers from an attack of the flu.

Considerable sickness is reported around Princeton. Two families are recovering from the flu and there is considerable colds and sore throat prevalent among the children.

Art Henderson and Orvis Morgan are both here from the Bovill hospital convalescing from the flu.

(ibid, page 2)
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., February 11, 1920, Page 4

Worley Funeral Held

The funeral of J. W. Worley was held Monday afternoon at 2 o’clock, conducted by Rev. H. O. Perry at Grice’s chapel. Only a few friends of the deceased were permitted to attend. Interment was made in the Moscow cemetery. Mrs. Worley and and her children, who have been ill are slowly improving.
— —

Coffee Importation Increase

During the last year the imports of coffee increased 237,000,000 pounds in quantity and $147,000,000,000 in value.

(ibid, page 4)
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., February 11, 1920, Page 5

City News

Mrs. M. P. Martinson, who has been very ill of pneumonia at her home on Polk street, is slowly improving. Mrs. McGillan is the attendant nurse.

G. F. Savage is convalescent after a severe attack of influenza.

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Stone are both ill of influenza at their home on north Jefferson. Mrs. Stone’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Butler from east of Moscow are in to assist in nursing and Mrs. Butler has been ill. All are improving except Mr. Stone, who is quite ill.

E. J. Rosenberg arrived this morning from Spokane to visit his family. Mrs. Rosenberg, who teaches in the public schools is confined to her home by illness.

Mrs. C. J. McCollister is seriously ill of pneumonia at the home of Mr. and Mrs. L. E. Brooks. Mr. and Mrs. McCollister whose home is in the Nez Perce, were in Moscow to visit friends and relatives, when Mrs. McCollister was taken ill of influenza about three weeks ago. Mrs. McCollister is a sister of Pat Perrine, a senior at the university.

Mrs. E. A. Keane has received work from Spokane that Mrs. Harry M. Driscoll is improving, after a very serious attack of pneumonia.

Mrs. W. H. Correll left today for Culdesac, called by the illness of her sons, of influenza.

Alton Cornielson, high school student, has recovered from the “flu” and is back in school again.

Mr. B. P. Luvaas was called to Genesee by the illness of his son, Lyman Luvaas, who had been taken ill with pneumonia, but later reports show a slight improvement.

The son and daughter of N. G. Gilbertson, east of Moscow, who have been very ill of pneumonia, following influenza, are reported a little better today but their condition is still causing grave concern.
— —

19200211DSM2Mrs. M. K. Bue Is Influenza Victim

Mrs. M. K. Bue died at her home in Enterprise, Oregon, last Saturday morning of pneumonia.

The body has been brought here for interment and the funeral will be held Thursday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Norwegian Lutheran church.

Mrs. Bue, whose maiden name was Marie Croghan, made her home in Moscow for several years previous to her marriage and was actively identified with the Norwegian Lutheran church of this city. She leaves besides her husband, who is a brother of Mrs. C. B. Westover, three children, one of whom was an infant two days old at the time of her death, one sister in Enterprise, three brothers in the east and hosts of relatives at different points, many of whom are living here in the west and among whom may be mentioned the Nordby families of Genesee, the Luvass, Ostroot and Dahl families of Moscow.

Rev. F. I. Schmidt will conduct the funeral, and all friends will be permitted to attend as the body will not be taken to the church.
— —

Texas Whiskey to Be Pure

Austin, Texas. — Whiskey, under the new prohibition law, is classed as a drug, and R. H. Hoffman, pure food and drug commissioner, has announced that he is “going after” retail druggists who are watering their whiskey. The law requires that medicinal whiskey be 44 to 50 per cent ethyl alcohol, he said, and druggists are now paying $1.70 a gallon, plus a $3 tax, for whiskey and selling it for $2 a pint, or $16 a gallon. Mr. Hoffman is of the opinion that they make enough profit without adding water to their stock.
— —

A Two Cent Honor

A bill has been introduced in the senate to restore the coinage of a two-cent coin to be known as the Roosevelt piece.

(ibid, page 5)
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., February 11, 1920, Page 6

Cora Correspondence; School Closed Monday

Cora — Mrs. I. S. Miller is very ill with influenza. Mr. Miller’s brother, Ham, visited him a few days last week.

Fritz Leistner and Mrs. Leistner’s brother Marvin McMannama, have been very ill with influenza, therefore school closed last Monday but is expected to open again this Wednesday.

Florence Kidwell came home for a few days but hearing that the Moscow high school was ready to open again, she returned to Moscow Sunday.

Howard Wilcox and Gertrude Farnam came home Thursday, the Garfield schools being closed.

Lewis Burson received word that his wife, who is visiting in North Dakota, is very seriously ill.

(ibid, page 6)
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., February 11, 1920, Page 7

19200211DSM3
Influenza Ban Still In Effect On Campus
No Social Events May Be Held Without Specific Authority

The influenza ban is still on and all students should remember that no public or social events may be held without specific permission or authority from Professor H. T. Lewis. Professor Lewis said he cannot guarantee any more basket ball games, but the ban was lifted for the Willamette game Monday night.

An interesting feature of the epidemic this year is the large number of cases among faculty members. Last year the faculty escaped with but one or two cases. Professor Conwell has suffered a relapse and is still ill. Professor Axtell was quite sick but is out now.

Thirty Student Cases

There have been from 30 to 35 students who have had the influenza, and new cases are being reported right along. Lyle Colburn and Carl Patch are ill at the S. A. E. house.

The Hutton home was opened for a girls’ hospital with Irene McKay and Miss Brown, nurse, in charge. Five patients are the most to be confined there at one time.

The “Y” hut was taken over for an emergency hospital for the boys. Two men are ill there now.

Volunteers Respond

In his call for volunteer nurses and assistants Professor Lewis had very good responses from the Chi Delta Phi, Gamma Phi Beta, Delta Gamma, Kappa Sigma, Sigma Nu and Phi Delta houses.

During the epidemic all individual health claims have been suspended and the money spent for hospital supplies and overhead expenses. The health claims will be established again as soon as the ban is lifted.

(ibid, page 7)
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., February 11, 1920, Page 8

President Lindley is Ill

Dr. E. H. Lindley, president of the University of Idaho, is confined to his home on First street with what is feared is a mild case of influenza. His condition is not regarded as serious and his many friends are hoping for his early recovery. Dr. Lindley was forced to cancel his engagement to speak at the annual banquet of the Young Men’s Republican Club, of Seattle, on Lincoln’s birthday, tomorrow night.

(ibid, page 8)
— — — — — — — — — —

Cutting Wood at Taney, Idaho (1)

TaneyFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

February 12

The Grangeville Globe. February 12, 1920, Page 4

19200212GG1

Can Prescribe Whiskey
Doctors and Druggists Required to Secure Permits

The Bureau of Internal Revenue has issued a statement relative to the regulations governing the use and procurement of intoxicating liquors for medical purposes.

Both the physician who prescribes and the pharmacist or druggist who sells liquor for medical purposes must have a permit. Application for the permits should be made to the Federal prohibition director. In States where prohibition directors have not been appointed application should be made to the Collector of Internal Revenue. In the case of residents of the District of Columbia application should be made to Collector of Internal Revenue, Joshua W. Miles, Baltimore, Md.

Blank forms – 1403 – for prescribing liquors are being printed and distributed among Federal prohibition directors assistant directors and collectors of internal revenue. Where such blanks are not yet available, physicians holding permits may issue prescriptions on blanks regularly used by them.

Following is the Bureau’s statement:

“Any physician duly licensed to practice medicine and actively engaged in the practice of such profession may obtain a permit to prescribe intoxicating liquor and may then issue prescriptions for distilled spirits, wines or certain alcoholic medicinal preparations for medical purposes for persons upon whom his in attendance in cases where he believes that the use of liquor as a medicine is necessary. In no case may spirituous liquor be prescribed by one or more physicians in excess of one pint for the same person within any period of ten days.

“No specific limitation is placed upon the quantity of wines which may be prescribed for medical purposes. The regulations merely require that no prescription be issued for a greater quantity than is necessary for use as a medicine. Physicians who do not hold permits to prescribe intoxicating liquor are under no circumstances permitted to issue prescriptions.

“All prescriptions for intoxicating liquor are required to be written on prescription blanks prescribed by the regulations (Form 1403), and to be provided by the Bureau, except that in emergency cases physicians may use their regular prescription blanks provided the same contain the date of issue, amount prescribed, to whom issued, and directions for use, stating the amount and frequency of dose.Pending an adequate supply of the official blanks being printed and distributed to directors and acting directors, physicians holding permits have been authorized to issue prescriptions on blanks regularly used by them.

“Prescriptions for intoxicating liquor may be filled only by registered pharmacists who hold permits authorizing them to do so, or who are employed by retail druggists holding such permits. Pharmacists and druggists holding such permits will procure their supplies of intoxicating liquor from manufacturer or other persons holding permits authorizing them to sell liquor.

“Persons to whom prescriptions for intoxicating liquor are issued by physicians may procure the liquor prescribed through pharmacists or druggists holding permits without obtaining a permit.

“Physicians may also obtain permits entitling them to procure not more than six quarts of distilled spirits, wines or certain alcoholic preparations during any calendar year for administration to their patients in emergency cases where delay in procuring liquor on a prescription through a pharmacist might have serious consequence to the patient.

“Provision is also made in the regulations for issuing permits to hospitals and sanatoriums to enable them to procure intoxicating liquor to be administered for medicinal purposes to patients at such institutions and also for issuing permits to manufacturing industrial, and other establishments maintaining first aid stations, authorizing them to procure liquor for administration to their employees for medical purposes in emergency cases.

“All applications for permits above referred to should be made on Form 1404 in triplicate and forwarded to the local Collector of Internal Revenue.

“Section 27 of the National Prohibition Act provides that any intoxicating liquor seized under section 25 or section 26 thereof, and subject to be destroyed, may upon application of the United States Attorney, be ordered by the court to be delivered to any person holding a permit to purchase liquor. All liquor seized under such sections of law may be diverted through regular channels for medicinal purposes under the procedure above described.

“Any intoxicating liquor seized under Federal Law prior to October 28, 1919, if not claimed within sixty days from such date, may likewise upon order of the court be delivered to any person holding a permit to purchase and be diverted to medicinal or other non-beverage purposes.”

Complaints of exorbitant charges for liquor for medicinal purposes which place dispensers thereof in the class of profiteers will be investigated.”

source: The Grangeville Globe. (Grangeville, Idaho), 12 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Grangeville Globe. February 12, 1920, Page 5

19200212GG2School Opens Monday

Unless something unforeseen occurs the schools will open for business Monday morning. All the teachers afflicted with the influenza have fully recovered and it is expected an attendance near normal will prevail.
— —

Will Visit California

Mr. and Mrs. W. N. Knox will leave some time next week for a few weeks or a month’s sojourn at points in California. Mr. Knox recently got out after a severe attack of the influenza and it is expected the California climate will assist him in recuperating and aid his health generally.

(ibid, page 5)
— — — — — — — — — —

Jerome County Times., February 12, 1920, Page 2

19200212JCT1

Senator Johnson Flu Victim

Washington. — Senator Hiram Johnson of California is ill at his home here from influenza, it has been learned. The senator has been confined to his bed, but it is not believed his condition is serious.

source: Jerome County Times. (Jerome, Idaho), 12 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Payette Enterprise., February 12, 1920, Page 1

19200212PE1

Personal And Local Mention

The Flu must have made its appearance at the Will Griggs home some time during Tuesday night. At least there was a ten pound boy arrived early Wednesday morning.

Mr. A. J. Vanderford being sick and unable to be at his place of business this week, C. F. Callen is janitor, head salesman and the whole push at the Chevrolet sales room.

Little Charles Woodward, son of Dr. J. C. Woodward, was suddenly taken last Saturday with what at first seemed to be infantile paralysis. His condition for a time appeared to be very critical, but later development proved his case not to be as first indicated and his condition not so serious. He is improving nicely and it is believed he will soon be fully recovered.

Mr. Langdon, proprietor of the Commercial Hotel wishes to repudiate the statement made in the Commissioners proceedings regarding smallpox at the Commercial, as there has been no cases to his knowledge.

source: Payette Enterprise. (Payette, Canyon Co., Idaho), 12 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Payette Enterprise., February 12, 1920, Page 4

19200212PE2How to Avoid Influenza

There is one point regarding influenza on which the medical profession is in agreement. This is stated by the Journal of the American Medical Association as follows:

“The pulmonary complications of influenza, which make it so serious a disease, may be avoided to a large extent by rest in bed at the onset of the illness. Influenza itself is not usually fatal, and general insistence on the importance of rest and warmth at the onset of the illness will accomplish more than all else in preventing complications and reducing fatalities from the disease.”

(ibid, page 4)
— — — —

Payette Enterprise., February 12, 1920, Page 5

Fruitland Department
Mrs. F. M. Burtch

The E. E. Holt Family, who have been ill, are much better.

The George McKeown family has been on the sick list, but all are improving at present.

Those who have been on the sick list but who are improving at present, are, the L. J. Meeker family, the Hooker family, the George Eldredge family, the Percy Frank family, Harry Powell and little daughter, Mr. Solterbeck and M. W. Hezeltine.

The sick folks at the Rands home are improving slowly.

The Whitley Bottom School is closed this week on account of so much sickness.

John Murdock is among those who were taken ill this week.

Mrs. Zane Schubert and Mrs. L. H. Eby have been quite ill the past week.

There will be no meeting of the Fruitland Mother’s Circle until March.

Miss Elsie Bayer came home from Caldwell Saturday on account of the illness of one of her teachers.

Both school and churches have been closed the past two weeks in the effort to stamp out the present outbreak of Flu in the community.

A. M. Carpenter and wife are on the sick list this week.

Mr. James Deal is recovering from his illness at the present writing.

The Methodist people very kindly have loaned the Bungalow, and the ladies of the community have fitted it up as a temporary hospital for the care of the sick.

Mr. H. B. Strawn is on the sick list this week.
— —

Clarence B. Griner

Clarence B. Griner who has been working here through the packing season, died on the morning of February 9th from pneumonia, following influenza. His entire family were ill and feeling that he must keep up in order to care for his loved ones, he heroically ministered to them until compelled to cease. He was born in Danville, Illinois, on March 25, 1887. On May 20, 1907 he was married to Miss Zora Jones and to this union five children were born, three boys and two girls. All but one survive him although at the time of his death two little daughters were lying near his bedside critically ill. In 1914 he took up a homestead near Ironside, Oregon, where he lived until coming to Fruitland last September. His father, Daniel Griner, is expected on Thursday from Illinois and arrangements for interment will be deferred until his arrival. The sympathy of the entire community is extended to the bereaved family.
— —

Oran C. Rands

Oran C. Rands was born at Tripp, S. D. on January 22, 1885, and departed this life on February 3, 1920 at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Rands, at Fruitland, Idaho. The cause of his illness was pneumonia following an attack of influenza. He is survived by a father, mother, two brothers and other relatives and many friends. Only last week his brother Franklin succumbed to the same disease. The sympathy of the community is extended to the sorrowing relatives.

(ibid, page 5)
—————-

Further Reading

There was almost a 1921 Theodore Roosevelt 2 cent piece

Well worn Copper 03 May 2019

1921Roosevelt2cent-a

Following the 1919 death of Theodore Roosevelt a bill was almost passed which would have created a Roosevelt two-and-a-half cent piece. The proposal gathered support in Congress, and by 1921 had been modified to a 2 cent coin, which was believed to help bookkeeping and accounting. The coin was to be struck in a mixture of 95% zinc and 5% copper. If this sounds familiar to anyone, it is the exact composition of our current cent! There is a great article in the June 1921 issue of The Numismatist debating the merits of such a piece. While many wanted to honor Roosevelt, there were some who felt his likeness would have been belittled on such a minor coin. And particularly since Roosevelt did so much to improve American coinage in his lifetime, the thought of placing his likeness on a zinc coin would have dishonored him. Apparently it was well known that a zinc/copper mixture would appear silvery at first, but quickly blacken once circulated. Eventually the bill died and nothing became of it. And Theodore Roosevelt would have to wait until his image was placed on the reverse of a 2016 quarter.

source: American Numismatic Association
— — — — — — — — — —

Mandatory masks, shuttered theatres and confusing rules: The 1918 Spanish flu pandemic and its similarities with today

Tu Thanh Ha And James Keller December 28, 2020 Updated February 3, 2021

[part 2]

Dr. Hastings

Like contemporary public-health officers who have become household names, the Spanish flu gave prominence to the early pioneers of preventive medicine such as Dr. Hastings.

He is recognized today as a key figure who improved the city’s sanitation in the early 20th century, reducing infant mortality and eradicating typhoid and tuberculosis.

Near retirement as a hospital physician, he turned to public health, spurred by the memory of a daughter who died of typhoid fever after she drank tainted raw milk. He started campaigning for pasteurization and better inspections of milk.

He became Toronto’s medical health officer in 1910, saying on his appointment that “I am anxious to make Toronto the banner city of the Dominion in the matter of health.”

He held the post for two decades. He advocated medical inspections at school to contain diphtheria and scarlet fever. Seeing that city officials revamped plumbing systems but still let sewage disposal taint the water supply, he complained in a speech that “they strain at a gnat and swallow a camel”

Like some other prominent Canadians at the time, he believed in eugenics. He warned that “the subnormal are producing two or three times as rapidly as the mentally normal,” and wanted to prevent “the spread and multiplication of worthless members of society.”

He retired in 1931, hailed as a man who had made Toronto more salubrious. But despite his skills, his handling of the Spanish flu was limited by the knowledge of the time.

Cures And Vaccines

Although Dr. Hastings warned people against squandering money on remedies of dubious value against the flu, stores ran out of menthol, camphor and lozenges. Makers of syrups, laxative, quinine tablets or meat extracts also claimed their products helped ward the flu.

During the war, the sale of spirits was restricted in much of Canada. One exception was liquor prescribed for medical reasons. By 1919, Ontario doctors had penned more than half a million prescriptions for whiskey. Police had to keep order as people lined up outside dispensaries selling liquor.

Meanwhile, Canadian researchers were part of the worldwide effort to isolate the flu strain and immunize the population.

A Queen’s University bacteriologist, Guilford Reed, tested a vaccine on 200 volunteers. The Connaught Laboratories, then part of the University of Toronto, produced another vaccine and shipped out thousands of doses to hospitals and the military.

The Globe described those scientists as “working for humanity.”

“In the solitude of their laboratories, they labour with germs and poisons,” The Globe reported. “They do this for no personal reward. Their discoveries never yield them great riches. … But they carry on that life may be safer and better for those about them, and for those who come after them.”

Those vaccines had a key shortcoming: Scientists at the time didn’t know that a virus, rather than larger bacteria, caused influenza. Nevertheless, modern researchers say those vaccines helped by reducing lethal bacterial complications in flu patients.

Sisters Of Service

As flu cases spiked up, it became clear the health care system would not be able to cope. Many nurses and doctors were overseas for the war. Others became sick, leaving hospitals short staffed. Many victims died at home without ever receiving medical care.

The Ontario government responded by mobilizing volunteer nurses as part of a new organization: Sisters of Service, or S.O.S. An Oct. 15 story announced a “new army to fight the flu,” with 60 women signing up during the first meeting at the legislature. As many as 2,000 volunteer nurses eventually joined the fight.

Margaret Patterson, a Toronto doctor who recently returned from fighting the bubonic plague in India, led the training effort. She held daily lectures and pamphlets with her lessons were distributed across the province.

Three of her lectures were printed in The Globe, addressed “to young lady volunteers.” They detailed instructions on monitoring and treating the symptoms, using household materials. “We are called upon to meet an emergency, a very old disease that is comparatively new to the present generation,” one of the lectures said.

Sisters of Service was part of a network of women’s organizations that rallied to respond to the Spanish flu, providing nursing services, making supplies such as pneumonia jackets to keep patients’ lungs warm and cooking for the sick. Those groups also included the Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire, who still operate today as IODE Canada.

1908Okak-aResidents of Okak, an Inuit community on Labrador’s northern coast, are shown circa 1908. A decade later, more than three-quarters of Okak’s population would be wiped out by the influenza pandemic, which had been brought to them by the same Moravian missionaries who encouraged them to settle in places like Okak.
Courtesy Of Them Days / Alice Perrault Collection

First Nations

Chief Joseph Davis was among thousands of First Nations soldiers who enlisted to serve in the war.

A trapper from the tiny Brunswick House First Nation near Chapleau, Ont., he sailed out for Europe, leaving behind his wife, Angeline, and three young daughters.

He came home in January, 1919, to find out that the flu had killed two of his children.

His wife had to travel more than 50 kilometres by canoe through ice-covered waters to reach Chapleau. One child was already dead. The other was gravely ill and died in hospital.

An earlier Globe article in November described another Indigenous woman who also came to Chapleau with two flu-stricken children. The woman, who was sick herself, had to portage her canoe for 10 kilometres with children in tow. She said she had left behind another woman and her two ailing children. They were later found dead.

The news from Brunswick House and other First Nations showed the reach of the flu in Indigenous communities, with fatality rates in some areas that were 10 times higher than nearby cities and towns.

One article reported that 86 out of 100 Inuit died at the Hebron mission in northern Labrador. Weakened survivors gathered together and left the dead in the other huts. They later discovered that the sled dogs had eaten the bodies. They had to kill the dogs and buried the remains of the dead in a hole cut in the frozen sea.

The flu also hit Indigenous communities in the west very hard, particularly in Manitoba. On the Cross Lake First Nation, nearly everyone was infected and 130 died out of a population of 500. The flu killed 120 of the Norway House Cree Nation – one in six residents. “It was something terrible, whole families wiped right out,” a Globe story read.

1918TelephoneOperators-aTelephone operators in High River, Alta., wear masks to protect themselves from the flu in 1918.
Glenbow Archives

What We Missed

While The Globe already billed itself “Canada’s national Newspaper,” its coverage of the Spanish flu often focused on Toronto and Ontario. There were updates about Quebec, but, beyond that, only occasional dispatches from the East Coast and Western Canada.

Even in Toronto, the coverage was often sporadic and tucked deep into the paper, drowned out by news from the war in Europe, which neared its end just when infections in Canada reached their peak.

The Last Wave

A lasting legacy of the pandemic was the creation of the federal Health Department. The idea of a national health ministry had been around for years, though largely discussed as a way to prevent venereal diseases. The ravages of the Spanish flu propelled the idea forward.

“The epidemic which is now ravaging Canada has brought the question up again in urgent form before the government,” The Globe reported.

Another wave of the flu in the spring of 1919 forced the finals of the Stanley Cup to be called off after five games between the Seattle Metropolitans and the Montreal Canadiens. Five players for the Habs became sick and one, Joe Hall, later died. Team manager George Kennedy also caught the flu and never fully recovered, dying two years later.

In many countries, the Spanish flu faded away by 1919. However, in Canada, there was a final wave in early 1920.

It struck Lieutenant-Colonel Dick Worrall, a picaresque figure who rose from private to commanding a battalion during the war. Born in England, he lied about his age to enlist at 16 in a British infantry regiment in 1906. He later enrolled in the U.S. Army, where he was garrisoned on an island when war started in 1914. He deserted, swam ashore then jumped onto a freight train to Quebec to join the Royal Montreal Regiment.

After the Armistice, he settled in Montreal and married Lorraine Welch, a war widow whose first husband, Captain Charles Crowdy, died from German shelling.

In February, 1920, Welch became ill with the flu. Her husband also contracted the disease while looking after her.

Worrall, who had survived the German gas attacks at Ypres and led night patrols in no man’s land, died shortly after midnight following nine days at Royal Victoria Hospital.

As one Globe article noted during the pandemic, “Never since the black death has such a plague swept the world.”

source: The Globe and Mail
——————–

Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 1)
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Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 48)
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Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 74)

Idaho History Oct 3, 2021

Idaho 1918-1920 Influenza Pandemic

Part 74

Idaho Newspaper Clippings February 7-10, 1920

Idaho photos courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

February 7

The Daily Star-Mirror., February 07, 1920, Page 1

19200207DSM1

19200207DSM2
Two More Deaths But Fewer Cases
Influenza Claims Two More Victims In Last 24 Hours – Five New Cases

Despite the fact that two more deaths having occurred from influenza, one in town and the other in the country near town, the general situation continues to show marked improvement. There were only five new cases reported Friday, as compared with 48 a week ago Friday and an average of 48 for five days last week. Many quarantine flags were taken down and many families released. How many cannot be learned. Dr. Leitch, city health officer, ordered five releases and every physician is believed to have release a number from quarantine.

Mrs. A. E. Meinig is Dead

Mrs. Hester Meinig, wife of A. E. Meinig, died this morning. She was 28 years old and leaves a husband and two children, aged six years and 16 months, respectively. Her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Culton, live near Viola. The family moved here from Kennedy Ford, near Palouse, last September. The funeral will be held Monday, interment being at Palouse.

Husband and Father Taken

A peculiarly sad death is that of Jesse W. Whorley, aged 33, who passed away about noon today. He was working for John King on the milk farm near the university. He had been sick for some time and his condition has been regarded as well nigh hopeless for some time. He leaves a widow and five children, the oldest nine years old. The family came here from South Carolina. They have no relatives nearer than that state. They had been here since April. Mr. Whorley was a man of excellent character and a hard worker. His death leaves the family in bad circumstances.

There are a few other very serious cases in and near town. Dr. Adair has a patient who death was expected last night but he is much better today and there is strong hope of his recovery.

General conditions are much improved. Schools will be opened Monday and nurses will be provided to look after the health of the children. Every well child is urged to attend. The school board hopes there will be no serious interference with school work as was the case last year.
— —

19200207DSM3Public Meetings Banned In Palouse
Schools, Churches, Lodges And Other Gatherings Closed By Council
(Palouse Republic)

Monday afternoon, following a session of the city council, sitting as a board of health, announcement was made that the public schools were to be closed and the community forego all public gatherings until further notice, in order to better guard against the spread of the influenza, a few cases of which had developed in the community. Placards were at once put up in all business houses and public places, limiting the number of persons who may assemble in any place of business, or other place in the city, to six. The decision of the board of health, acting on the report of Dr. Walter Farnham, city health officers, met with the approval of citizens generally, all being eager to do everything possible to check a serious outbreak of the disease which took such a toll in human life last year.

As a result of the order of the health board, there will not be services in any of the local churches next Sunday. Neither will there be lodge meetings or other gatherings, either in public buildings or in private homes.

Conditions Not Serious Here

The influenza situation in Palouse is not at all serious. At the time of going to press, the health officer reported 20 cases in the city, six of which are in one family, that of L. S. Carroll. The cases are all mild. The opinion seems to be that if the epidemic does not gain headway during the next few days, the schools will be opened again Monday. This, however, cannot be determined yet.

In the country surrounding Palouse, the condition is worse than in town, there being dozens of cases in farm homes in the neighborhood. Some of these cases are quite severe, but none are reported serious. Three members of the John Kamm family, Mr. and Mrs. Kamm and Floyd, the oldest son, have the disease in a rather severe form.

Local doctors are on the job early and late and are giving all the patients the best care possible.
— —

Harry Whittier’s Sister Died Wednesday

Word has been received in Moscow that Mrs. J. H. Robinson, a sister of Harry Whittier and Mrs. C. N. Lussier died at Sioux City, Iowa, on Wednesday, February 4. Her death was due to influenza. Mrs. Robinson leaves her husband, two children and her parents, in addition to brothers and sisters. Mrs. and Mrs. Whittier were in New York on a pleasure trip when notified of the death of Mr. Whittier’s sister and they have gone to Sioux City. It is believed they will return to Moscow in a few days.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 07 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., February 07, 1920, Page 2

[Editorial]

While more deaths are occurring from influenza than at any time since the epidemic struck Moscow, there is no cause for alarm. The gratifying part of the reports is that there has been a steady decline in the number of new cases from 48 a week ago yesterday to five yesterday and the same number today. Those who have died are among the first victims of the wave which struck Moscow three weeks ago. Schools are to open Monday and the utmost care will be exercised in protecting the children from exposure to the disease. It is believed that the wave is almost spent and while there may be a few new cases occasionally, the general situation is such that people should not be alarmed if they learn of a death of a patient who has been ill for weeks.

(ibid, page 2)
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., February 07, 1920, Page 3

City News

The art department of the Historical club will not meet until further notice.

Mrs. C. H. Phelps, north of Moscow, has been quite ill of influenza, but is now recovering and able to be up about the house.

Dr. J. J. Herrington returned today from Viola where he visited several influenza patients.

Mrs. Harry Young, who died of pneumonia following influenza, at Pullman, was brought to Moscow today for burial in the Moscow cemetery. She leaves a husband and two children.

Mr. and Mrs. Leroy Lewis, who were recently married at Weippe, and were on their way to Astoria to live, stopped off in Moscow for a day or two last week. They were both taken ill of influenza and have been very sick at the Hotel Moscow, but they are now reported better. Miss Winnifred Edmundson and Mrs. Mary Hawley have assisted in nursing them.

Mrs. Swecker, who has been several weeks at a local hospital, left today for her home at Troy.

Victor Howland, of the Roth Construction company, who was ill of influenza, is reported as improving.

H. E. Carpenter from north of Moscow was in Moscow today on business. He says the “flu” cases in that neighborhood are all recovering.

Word has been received that Mrs. Harry M. Driscoll is very ill of influenza in Spokane.
— —

19200207DSM4Influenza At Kendrick Is Reported Very Mild

There are quite a number of influenza cases in Kendrick at this time, a number of new ones having developed since last week. Fortunately, however, none appear to be serious at all. Among the business men Mr. Lutz and Mr. Jorday Long are the only ones to date who have had to desist from their labors until they had had their chills and remained in bed the required length of time.

It seems that most of those who have contracted the disease failed to have it last year. The writer is one of those who was passed up last year and it is needless to say that he is knocking wood at every opportunity, crossing his fingers every time he passes a white horse and making a detour of the block every time a rabbit starts across the road ahead of him, which causes considerable pedestrying in this bunny infested town.

Fortunately the people of the community are taking the situation calmly and are taking care of themselves as soon as they contract the disease. Both doctors are going day and night to handle their many patients in town and surrounding country. — Kendrick Gazette

(ibid, page 3)
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., February 07, 1920, Page 4

Dr. J. A. McDaniel is recovering from an attack of influenza and will soon be out again.
— —

1920 Census

Valley County 951

(ibid, page 4)
— — — — — — — — — —

Mountain Home, Idaho

MountainHomeFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

February 9

The Daily Star-Mirror., February 09, 1920, Page 1

19200209DSM1

19200209DSM2
Schools Are Open Large Attendance
Influenza Conditions Show Marked Improvement – Believe End Is Near

Moscow schools opened Monday morning with a 95 per cent attendance in the high school building and a good attendance in the grades. All of the Teachers with the exception of Mrs. Rich, were in their places. Nurses are on hand to look after the children and see that only the well are admitted. Conditions in the schools are giving entire satisfaction, the attendance being better than was hoped for. It is believed that by the last of the week attendance will be normal.

Many applications for the position of superintendent of city schools, made vacant by the death of Professor Rich, are being received and some of them come from strong men, with splendid experience. The school board feels encouraged by the number of applications received and the generally high character of the applicants. No selection will be made until the qualifications of all applicants can be thoroughly investigated.

That the new cases of influenza now developing are more severe than formerly is the statement of Dr. J. N. Clarke, one of Moscow’s busiest physicians. Dr. Clarke said: “I do not know how it is with other physicians but in my practice I find that the new cases as a rule have the disease in a harder form than earlier in the siege. But conditions appear to be much better. There are fewer new cases and many of the old cases are being released as cured. There are a number of very severe cases in town yet and these cases are causing some uneasiness but I believe that within four or five days the worst will be over and normal conditions will soon return. The warm, bright sunshine is a help.”

Only six new cases were reported for Sunday as compared with five each for Friday and Saturday, six for Thursday, 15 for Wednesday and 19 for Tuesday.

Much Help Needed

The great need now is for help in the homes where the quarantine has been raised. Mrs. E. C. Boom of the Red Cross staff, has charge of this work. Mrs. Boom said: “We need a number of women to go into the homes and help clean up and do the house work. This is not charity work, but will be paid for. Women who have just got out of bed and are weak yet, cannot do this work. If any woman or number of women, are willing to go into homes and do this work for good pay I wish they would telephone me at 213, and I will assign them to the work. This is work that must be done and will be paid for. It is our greatest need at this time. There is believed to be no danger as these homes have been fumigated and the quarantine raised in all homes where this work needs to be done.”

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 09 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., February 09, 1920, Page 3

City News

Mrs. M. E. Lewis is recovering from an attack of influenza.

J. S. Heckathorn is able to return to his place as cashier at the First National Bank this morning after an attack of influenza. W. F. Morgareidge has recovered from the influenza and is able to be at his post in the postoffice today.

Mrs. W. S. Snoddy is acting as substitute teacher in Mrs. Rich’s room at the Whitworth school.

The family of C. W. Lenhard, northeast of Moscow, are released from quarantine for influenza.

Rev. H. O. Perry went to Palouse this morning to conduct the funeral services of Mrs. A. E. Meinig, who was taken to Palouse for burial. The funeral was largely attended by many of the friends of Mr. and Mrs. Meinig, who formerly lived near Palouse.

Gust Paulson is down town today for the first [time] after a two weeks’ siege of influenza.

(ibid, page 3)
— — — — — — — — — —

Hotel, Middleton, Idaho ca. 1908

Middleton1908Fritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

February 10

The Caldwell Tribune. February 10, 1920, Page 1

19200210CT1

19200210CT2
Dread Disease Now Departing
Influenza Believed To Have Past Crisis And Now Receding

Influenza is believed to be rapidly on the wane in Caldwell and the surrounding territory. New cases are becoming rarer most of those who had the disease are out again. In general the epidemic, while almost as prevalent as it was last year, took a considerably milder form and only about six deaths have been recorded for this section that can be attributed to influenza or pneumonia which followed it.

According to one local physician, while the epidemic was at its height, there was almost 1000 cases of varying degrees of severity in this city and throughout the tributary country. Many of these were never seen by physicians. Owing to the large number of calls and the fact that there are only 24 hours in a day, doctors could not visit every case.

While the epidemic was severe enough to have caused no little worry it did not reach such proportions and seriousness that any action relative to closing schools and public places of meeting was deemed advisable. Many of the cases this year were unusually mild and where good home care prevailed, no difficulty was expected in hastening recovery.

While many of those who had the disease last winter again suffered from it, their immunity was quite marked according to local doctors. In proportion to the total number of cases, those who repeated were not many. It is believed that with another year the disease will have deteriorated in virility until it will not cause any great worry, even if it should appear again in the form of an epidemic. This year’s experience with the disease would seem to indicate that this is the logical thing to expect.

What effect the bad weather prevailing the past week until Saturday may have had on the prevalence of influenza is not known but it is generally credited with having proved a contributing factor in its spread.

source: The Caldwell Tribune. (Caldwell, Idaho), 10 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. February 10, 1920, Page 6

Items of Interest From Surrounding Territory

Claytonia

The schools in the district have been closed on account of the influenza. It was proved last year that it was a poor policy to close the schools. It was better to quarantine the home as soon as there was a sick person in it until all were well. Then the rest of the people would not suffer.

The Lindh family has now recovered nicely from the influenza. So has Mr. and Mrs. Tom Jackson and family. Mr. Hansbrough was supposed to have had it but not hard at all. Mr. and Mrs. Ike Lineberger with their little boy were quite serious but are recovering.

Miss Everetson a sister of Mrs. Morsing returned to Ogden, Utah, after spending her vacation here. While here she helped the Lindn family during the influenza crisis.

Mrs. Jamison and daughter, Margaret has [sic] returned from their visit to Iowa. They would have stayed longer but the influenza was so bad in the town where they stayed that there was a danger of a complete quarantine and they decided to return home at once.

We are glad to state that Mrs. Frank Norton is recovering nicely.

The revival meetings at the Nazerine church are getting along very nicely and will continue indefinitely unless closed by the health board.

In this part of the country, We hoped that the ground hog did not see its shadow last Monday and that the full moon on Wednesday would give a perfect change.

Wilder

The ladies aid society meeting to be held last Thursday has been postponed indefinitely on account of the many cases of influenza.

The womans study club has postponed their regular meeting which was to have been held on Thursday, February 10th, to February 17 on account of sickness.

Ten Davis News

The farm bureau meeting which was to be held at the Grange hall this week was postponed on account of the illness of Mr. Bennett who was to speak.

Mrs. Carl Burau has been ill with the influenza the past week.

Margaret Conners was unable to be at school one day last week.

S. G. Tucker, Dudley, Grace and Anna, have been ill with the influenza for several days. The girls were absent from school all week.

A large number of the children have been absent from school this week. As the influenza cases are decreasing there probably will be more there this coming week.

Mrs. Robert Trummell, who is ill at the home of her son, Piercie Trummell is enjoying a visit from her sister Mrs. Mary Marquis of Cambridge, Idaho.

Canyon

A good number of children have returned to school, though quite a number are still out.

One sad result of the influenza was the death of Mrs. Dyar, the mother of a large family of children. The family are living in the Thomas Hartily home, which they have recently purchased. The were all sick and without help till Mrs. Rena Kline had the courage to care for them.

Among those who have recently been attacked by the influenza are the families of Carl Hammar and E. C,. Guill.

G. H. Myers seems to be immune from the influenza. He has been helping care for a number of his neighbors and seem to have no fear of the disease.

Dr. Weymouth was called to treat Mrs. Emmett on Wednesday.

As already advertised, the meeting appointed at the school house for the 10th has been given up because of the poor health of the entertainer.

(ibid, page 6)
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. February 10, 1920, Page 8

Local And Personal

Judge E. L. Bryan of the district court is fully recovered from an attack of influenza which threatened pneumonia.

The district court calendar will be set Friday, having been postponed from the time of the initial call because of the illness of Judge Bryan. Jury cases will not be tried for some time because of the prevalence of the influenza epidemic, the court holding the belief that it will cause individuals no inconsiderable inconvenience to sit on jury cases. Because of the prevalence of the disease, it is believed that a considerable portion of the names drawn would be unavailable at this time.

Funeral services were held Sunday for Mrs. Martha Tolson at the Case undertaking parlors. The Rev. Martin Damer, pastor of the Episcopal church both here and at Nampa, conducted the services at 2:30 p.m. Mrs. Tolson died Friday at the age of 54 years, following an attack of pneumonia.

Funeral services were held Saturday afternoon for Reuben Eells who died last Friday of pneumonia. The child was eight [years] old and the son of Mr. and Mrs. Eells, who live near Snake river.

Mrs. John Boone, who has been quite ill with influenza, has entirely recovered.

Mrs. Stoddard Judd died Sunday morning of pneumonia following influenza. Funeral services have not been arranged for as yet.

Ralph Henshaw of Greenleaf died Sunday morning of pneumonia.
— —

College of Idaho Notes

Raymond Rice of Roswell and Sidney McLaughlin of Ten Davis, have returned to school after a touch of the influenza.

(ibid, page 8)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Idaho Republican. February 10, 1920, Page 1

19200210TIR1

19200210TIR2
Fumigate Rooms of School Houses

In order to ward off any possibility of influenza epidemic being furthered at the local schools every room has been thoroly [sic] aired and fumigated. All day Saturday the doors and windows were left open allowing a free circulation of air and Sunday every room was fumigated.

Absences among the pupils of the grade schools show an average of ten absent last week from each of the twenty-six rooms. The high school had only fifteen absent Friday out of a total enrollment of 350.
— —

19200210TIR3
Volunteer Nurses

In a number of influenza cases in Blackfoot and surrounding territory nursing service is needed, and available nurses are asked to list their names with Mrs. George Holbrook at the city hall or with W. B. Goodnough at the Goodnough Cleaning & Tailoring Co. if they desire to volunteer to take cases where help is required.
— —

Hold Funeral of Maurice B. Watson

Funeral services of Maurice B. Watson, who died Wednesday afternoon of the influenza, were held Saturday morning at the family home on North Main street. Rev. A. F. Colver of the Baptist church preached the funeral sermon. Interment was in Grove City cemetery.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 10 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. February 10, 1920, Page 2

[Editorial]

19200210TIR4
Prevent The Flu

The influenza is less dangerous this year than last because people are happier and better nourished. The best health insurance is health.

All disease becomes less dangerous and less frequent in its attacks as all people go more hand in hand with laws of nature. So long as some of the people contract disease just so long will they transmit it to others who are healthy and ought to escape it.

There are reasons for everything, including the flu. Every human body carries around a lot of germs capable of causing disease if their number becomes large enough, and every healthy human body carries also enough anti-disease elements to keep the germs down, unless they be augmented by an incoming horde from the outside.

The powers of darkness work in the dark, and germs live in dirt. The first thing to do to prevent disease then is to prevent accumulations of dirt and waste and let plenty of clean fresh air and sunshine in. Lack of these things breaks down resistance to any disease attack.

Disease and health are as opposite as crying and laughing, as sorrow and joy, as dark and light. Sunshine, joy and health are allies. Disease spreads under the favorable conditions of darkness, unhappiness and foul air by contact just as rot spreads in a barrel of apples. Sickness is the penalty of a disregard for nature’s self-evident rules. And they not only suffer who invite disease, but they also who are nearby.

Altho [sic] in treating all troubles of the lungs plenty of fresh air is always insisted on by the best physicians yet only a small part of the people believe that fresh, cold air is not harmful. There was great uproar in some of the army hospitals two years ago when owing to scarcity of housing space many men were put out-of-doors on verandas and in tents, and yet the death rate of out-door patients was not much more than half that of in-door patients. Even the nurses who caught the flu kicked at being put out of the house and having their lives saved thereby.

When the public is finally convinced of the healing power of fresh air and sunshine public epidemics will lose their kick.

The American public has almost, but not quite, been taught that filth produces typhoid fever, and that form of disease has been reduced to a minimum. At the same time lung diseases, and foremost among them, pneumonia, are in the increase because of filthy air. One of the greatest checks the army put upon epidemics two years back was a thinning out of the men so that only a half dozen should live in one tent instead of nine, ten and twelve. At the same time it was next to impossible for the authorities to make the men leave the cap off their tent peaks at night and their windows open if they lived in barracks. The love of close, stuffy air in inborn in Americans, and possibly in the whole human race, for the French are yet worse. The French death rate is very high too.

The best flu preventions are: Fresh air, sunshine, clean houses, clean clothes, clean bodies and cheerful minds. This will be confirmed by any first rate medical authority.

– F. C. K.
— —

Firth

Miss Emma Brewington is absent from her duties as clerk in the Ramsey Cash store, on account of illness, Miss Laura Wernette assuming her place.

The family of C. L. Collins is reported on the sick list this week.

The family of R. F. Wilkie are reported on the sick list.

Dr. Roberts of Shelley was a professional caller in town Tuesday.

Lavaside

The I. J. Larson family is on the sick list this week.

(ibid, page 2)
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. February 10, 1920, Page 4

Many Activities At High School

Margaret Williams, a member of the sophomore class returned to her home at Thomas Wednesday on account of illness.

Erma Taylor and Elsie Neff are substituting at the Central and Irving schools because of the illness of Miss Schroeder and Miss Logan.

Thelma Larson is taking the place of Miss Smoot, who is ill.
— —

Firth

The C. L. Collins family, who have been very ill with influenza, are all reported greatly improved.

The William Murphy family are ill with the influenza at this time.

(ibid, page 4)
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. February 10, 1920, Page 5

Local News

Mrs. C. B. Lint, principal of the Kimball schools was taken to the hospital Saturday suffering with influenza. She is reported to be doing very nicely.

Grace Babbitt was ill the latter part of the week and unable to attend to her duties at the Golden Rule store.

Miss Fannie Thim, who was called to Salt Lake City last week on account of the illness of her sister, returned the last of the week to her duties at the Golden Rule store.

Word has been received from the Misses Winifred and Mary O’Rourke who are in Maple Lake, Minn. at the bedside of the ill father. They report his condition improving and expect to be able to return to their school here before long.

(ibid, page 5)
— — — — — — — — — —

Bonners Ferry Herald. February 10, 1920, Page 1

19200210BFH1

19200210BFH2Porter Victim Of Influenza
Buried Saturday Afternoon In Spokane – Wellknown In This City

William Porter, the popular representative of the Western Casualty Co. in this district, died at his home in Spokane Thursday of influenza. The funeral was held in Spokane Saturday afternoon and several of the friends of the deceased from this district, attended the services.

The deceased was 32 years old and is survived by his wife, a three year old daughter, a mother residing at Oregon City, Oreg., and a brother residing in Seattle.

News of the death of Mr. Porter came as a great shock to his many friends here, none having known of his illness. On his last trip to this city he had complained of a severe cold and a few weeks ago he had suffered from an attack of the la grippe. …

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 10 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Bonners Ferry Herald. February 10, 1920, Page 4

Local Pick-ups

Mrs. Joe Neumayer has been seriously ill this week with influenza and was taken to the Bonners Ferry hospital to receive treatment.

County Commissioner Fed G. Chambers, who has been seriously ill with pneumonia, is improving in health and will be able to be up and around in a week or ten days.

Mrs. L. N. Brown left for Spokane Sunday in response to word advising her of the illness of her nephew, William Fewkes, with influenza.

Mrs. Thomas Williams returned last week from Spokane where she had been called by the serious illness of her sister, Mrs. C. D. Rowell. At last reports Mrs. Rowell was considerably improved in health.

Senator W. S. Walker and Representative A. J. Kent left yesterday for Boise to attend the special session of the legislature called to convene tomorrow for the purpose of ratifying the constitutional amendment for women suffrage.

(ibid, page 4)
— — — —

Bonners Ferry Herald. February 10, 1920, Page 5

Mrs. E. H. Brock Dead

Word was received here yesterday morning of the death of Mrs. E. H. Brock, at her home at Golden, Mont.

It is understood that Mrs. Brock died from an attack of influenza.

Mrs. Brock was the step-mother of Mrs. George McGlocklin and Mr. and Mrs. McGlocklin left this morning for Golden to attend the funeral.

The deceased formerly lived here and was admired and respected by all who knew her. These friends all extend deepest sympathy to the mourning relatives.
— —

19200210BFH3

Kantleek Hot Water Bottles and Syringes
The finest hot water bottle made. We guarantee them for three years.

Fever Thermometers
Absolutely necessary in all sickrooms. standard makes at from $1.25 to $2.00 each.

Atomizers
For use with both oil and water; for spraying the nose or throat we feature the Derilbliss line.

Bed and Douche Pans, Porcelain and Enamel Ware.

Fumigation – Sulfur and Formaldehyde. Do not give the germs a single chance.

(ibid, page 5)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., February 10, 1920, Page 1

19200210DSM1

19200210DSM2
Only Three Influenza Cases Reported Monday

A new low record for influenza cases was set Monday when but three new cases were reported and a score or more were released. This is the lowest number since the “flu” struck Moscow and is regarded as very encouraging. Conditions are considered by physicians and all who are conversant with the disease, as being better than any time since the epidemic appeared here.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 10 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., February 10, 1920, Page 3

City News

The play which was to have been given by the Drama Club this evening at Gild Hall has been postponed until Tuesday, February 17. The “The Truth,” by Clyde Fitch will be given.

Mrs. Victor Peterson left for Spokane today to assist in taking care of the family of W. C. Renfrew, several members of whom are ill of influenza. Mrs. Peterson has been nursing Mr. Renfrew here at Moscow and he is very much improved and will soon be out again after an attack of influenza.

Mrs. Cyrus Roberts left today for American Ridge, called by the illness of her daughter, who is a victim of mumps.

The Viola schools were opened Monday but with a very small attendance. The cases of influenza in the district have practically all recovered.

Mrs. Geo. Stone arrived today from Colton to assist in nursing some “flu” cases in Moscow.

(ibid, page 3)
————

Further Reading

Mandatory masks, shuttered theatres and confusing rules: The 1918 Spanish flu pandemic and its similarities with today

Tu Thanh Ha And James Keller December 28, 2020 Updated February 3, 2021

1918AlbertaChildren-a
Alberta children wear masks to guard against Spanish influenza in 1918. The global pandemic killed some 50 million people, including about 50,000 Canadians.
Canmore Museum

In the fall of 1918, many small towns in Canada felt eerily desolate.

In Erickson, Man., the railway station master was nowhere to be seen. The hotel and stores were closed. Bags of unsorted mail piled up in the shuttered post office.

In larger cities, people were dying in such large numbers that they couldn’t be interred as usual. Montreal ran out of coffins and used delivery wagons as makeshift hearses. In Toronto, bodies piled up in cemetery vaults, awaiting burial.

On the East Coast, the Cape Breton village of Marble Mountain also looked deserted. “The village store is left wide open, and those who are physically able serve themselves as no clerks are now available.”

Those details appeared a century ago in The Globe, the newspaper that would become The Globe and Mail. The full force of the Spanish influenza had reached North America just in the last months of the First World War, in a pandemic that eventually killed 50,000 Canadians and 50 million people around the world.

The reports in The Globe from 1918 contain eerie similarities with today’s pandemic.

Authorities banned public gatherings and shut down businesses. Some people complained about having to wear masks. The Stanley Cup finals were disrupted. The U.S. president, Woodrow Wilson, and Canadian prime minister Robert Borden both caught the flu.

There were differences, too. There was little co-ordination from Ottawa or provincial governments, leaving local officials to fend for themselves. Little attention was paid to the economic toll or how governments could help. Unlike COVID-19, the Spanish flu hit children and young adults the hardest.

We read more than two years of coverage in The Globe to see how it covered that crisis. …

How It Arrived

Researchers now believe that the pandemic started in the spring of 1918, in a “herald wave” that wasn’t very lethal. In Canada, it went largely unnoticed.

In April, Dr. Charles Hastings, then Toronto’s medical officer of health, was asked about the city’s numerous cases of pneumonia and influenza. “Dr. Hastings laid the blame partly on the season and partly on the prevalence of dust,” The Globe reported. “The mucous membranes are sensitive this time of the year.”

The first public notice of a large-scale problem emerged from Spain, giving the illness its name, though it didn’t originate there. “A strange illness that resembles the flu” emptied Madrid’s theatres and sickened many Spaniards, The Globe published in May. By the summer, military camps in the United States suffered outbreaks affecting thousands.

Then the second wave struck, arriving in Canada in mid-September, when 150 became sick and three died at an army camp for Polish American volunteers near Niagara-on-the-Lake. Major Thomas Morrison, a camp official, predicted the outbreak would end soon “with the advent of a few fine days.”

Unreported in The Globe was the flu’s first outbreak among civilians, in the Quebec town of Victoriaville, after the Sept. 15 end of a Roman Catholic eucharistic congress that drew 40,000 faithful. The final day of the event included a mass at a local boarding school, the Sacré-Coeur college. Right afterward, teaching brothers and students at the college started to get sick and die.

Shutdowns And Lockdowns

Troubling news came from Sydney, N.S., where a ship landed on Sept. 21 with 500 ailing American soldiers. Within days, eight died. A curling rink and church halls became hospitals. Theatres, dance halls and schools closed.

Near Montreal, soldiers became sick at a depot in Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu. The conscription crisis might have contributed to the contagion when military police detained suspected draft dodgers who later fell ill. On Oct. 7, Montreal ordered schools, theatres and dance halls to close.

Ontario still hadn’t fully grasped the threat. On Page 8, The Globe buried a story with the headline “Spanish Flu Invades City,” where Dr. Hastings assured that the “outbreak is little different to that of other fall seasons, except, if anything, it is a little milder.” The Globe reported that authorities felt “no alarm.”

Then infections skyrocketed. The death toll, reported in daily summaries, climbed steadily. Factories reported severe shortages of workers. Funeral directors could not keep up with the dead. Hospitals overflowed as doctors and nurses fell ill.

Toronto eventually followed other cities in shutting down public activities. Dr. Hastings advised people to shop by telephone and walk to work. Hotels were turned into makeshift hospitals. Court witnesses no longer had to kiss the Bible when taking an oath.

Conventions and other gatherings were banned, followed by the closure of theatres, libraries and pool halls. Churches cancelled Sunday services or held shorter ones. “Toronto woke yesterday morning to a silent Sabbath, very few church bells called people to worship and a hush seemed to fall upon the whole city,” The Globe reported.

The flu then reached the western provinces. Alberta made face coverings compulsory while outdoors. “Everyone in Edmonton had to wear a mask; you could not ride on a streetcar without it,” one resident told The Globe.

Lethbridge was quarantined. Trains were locked down when they neared the city. In other Prairie towns along the rail lines, “guards are placed at the depots, and intending visitors are informed that they can enter the town only if prepared to remain until the epidemic has abated.”

Almost as soon as officials ordered widespread closings, their thoughts turned to when they could lift those restrictions, expecting the outbreaks would be over in just days or weeks.

By early November, cities across Ontario and Quebec lifted their orders. Dr. Hastings announced that “the bottom has dropped out of the influenza epidemic.”

This created a pattern, alternating between outbreaks and periods of calm, shutdowns and reopenings, as cases repeatedly flared again into 1920.

Some members of the public pushed back against the medical restrictions.

The priest at a church in Quebec defied orders to close and officials promised legal consequence. In Alberta, there were grumbles in local newspapers about the provincial order to cover faces when outdoors.

Globe readers found the restrictions confusing and contradictory. One letter to the editor asked why theatres and churches had to close, while streetcars remained crowded. “Did the Medical Health Officer ever ride downtown at 8 o’clock in the morning on a Dundas car? If not, he better put on a ‘flu’ mask and take the trip for once. … The danger to health from riding to and from work under such conditions is infinitely greater than sitting quietly in a well-ventilated church.”

Part 1 from: The Globe and Mail
—————-

Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 1)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 2)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 3)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 4)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 5)
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Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 10)
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Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 19)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 20)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 21)
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Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 23)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 24)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 25)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 26)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 27)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 28)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 29)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 30)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 31)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 32)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 33)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 34)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 35)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 36)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 37)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 38)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 39)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 40)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 41)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 42)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 43)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 44)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 45)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 46)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 47)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 48)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 49)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 50)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 51)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 52)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 53)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 54)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 55)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 56)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 57)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 58)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 59)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 60)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 61)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 62)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 63)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 64)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 65)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 66)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 67)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 68)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 69)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 70)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 71)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 72)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 73)

Idaho History Sept 26, 2021

Idaho 1918-1920 Influenza Pandemic

Part 73

Idaho Newspaper Clippings February 6, 1920

Idaho photos courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

February 6

The Rathdrum Tribune., February 06, 1920, Page 1

19200206RT1

Idaho State News Items

A total of 2488 cases of influenza in Idaho, most of them in the southern part of the state, were reported to the department of public welfare at Boise for the week ended Jan. 31. Eighteen influenza deaths and 16 pneumonia deaths were reported for the same period, a marked increase over the previous week.

Wm. J. Hall, state commissioner of public works, promises the governor that a finished capitol building will be delivered to the state this fall, the legislative halls completely furnished for business.

There are 600 silos in Ada county.
— —

From Over The County

Post Falls

The picture show was closed on account of the flu.

Coeur D’Alene

A few cases of influenza were reported in Coeur d’Alene last week.

source: The Rathdrum Tribune. (Rathdrum, Idaho), 06 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Rathdrum Tribune., February 06, 1920, Page 3

Personal Mention

Mrs. H. A. Knox is reported recovering from a severe illness.

Mrs. R. E. Young and children are ill with influenza.

Miss Linda McCoid was able to attend school again last Friday, after two weeks’ illness with pneumonia.

Miles F. Egbers is ill at his home, but expects to be out again in another day or two. Rumors that he had influenza are erroneous.

Jas. H. Wright, who has were from Hauser Lake, Tuesday, reported his family ill with influenza. His daughter, Miss Corinne Wright, a student in the Rathdrum high school, went home to spend Sunday and was unable to return to school this week.
— —

Local Paragraphs

Four cases of influenza were reported in Rathdrum the first of the week, the first appearance of the infection here this year. These cases are confined to one family, and no other cases have been reported up to the time these forms were closed.

Precautions to avoid spreading influenza were urged by Chairman Geo. W. Flemming of the board of village trustees in a brief speech at the Star theater Saturday night, in compliance with a request from the state medical advisor. Persons ill with colds are advised to consult a physician before going out and mingling with others.

The Rathdrum school district received some red fir wood from the Welch place last week, contracted for some time ago by R. E. Young. It cost the district over $8 a cord delivered at the heating plant.

(ibid, page 3)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., February 06, 1920, Page 1

19200206DSM1

19200206DSM2
Influenza Cases Still Decreasing
Only Five New Cases Reported For Thursday – Lowest Record Yet

Still more encouraging is the report of the influenza situation in Moscow. With only five new cases reported Thursday, the lowest number since the disease began, and many times that number released as cured, the outlook is indeed much brighter.

There was one more death, that of Mrs. Duffey, who was among the first to be stricken with the disease and whose death has been expected for some time. But so far as known all other cases show improvement and it is believed there will be no more deaths from the disease.

Weather conditions are much more favorable. The bright sunshine of Thursday afternoon and the warmer weather Friday replacing the cold damp fog of the previous three days, is welcomed by all.

An encouraging sign is the rapid disappearance of influenza quarantine cards from Moscow homes. A few days ago it seemed, in driving over the city, that almost every third house had a quarantine sign, but these are rapidly disappearing and the patients who have been “holed up” like squirrels during the winter season, are seen on the street, somewhat emaciated, but cheerful and very glad to be out.

Judge and Mrs. W. G. Barge, who had the disease at the same time and were both quite sick, are able to be out and Judge Barge says there is no joke about the “flu” being a disagreeable disease.

Better At Lewiston

Lewiston reports conditions much better than at any time since the epidemic struck that town. There are a number of cases throughout Nez Perce county but in Lewiston few cases are reported and there have been no deaths for several days.

No Deaths At Grangeville

Grangeville reports yesterday as the first day in six in which there were no influenza death in the city. General conditions in Grangeville are reported much improved.

Decreasing At Seattle

Seattle. — Influenza has reached its crest in Seattle and is now on the decline, according to City Health Commissioner H. M. Read, who announced tonight that 168 new cases of influenza had been reported today as compared to 190 yesterday. A total of 1,056 cases had been reported up to tonight, Dr. Read said, with 12 deaths, four of them occurring today. Five deaths have been reported from broncho-pneumonia.

Fewer Spokane New Cases

Spokane. — A marked decrease in the number of new influenza cases were reported here tonight, 134 being the total as against 308 yesterday. There were 106 releases today and four deaths, leaving 1,574 cases prevailing. Cooler, dry weather is given as cause for the decrease.

Three Portland Deaths

Portland. — Three deaths from influenza were reported today to the local board of health, making a total of seven deaths in Portland since the disease first was discovered several weeks ago. Eighty-six new cases were reported today, making the total 520 thus far reported. Fifty cases were released from quarantine yesterday as cured.

300 New at San Francisco

San Francisco. — Three hundred new cases of influenza were reported here today.

Decrease at Chicago

Chicago. — A continued gradual decline in influenza and pneumonia cases was recorded today. New cases of influenza numbered 570; pneumonia, 237. There were 61 deaths from influenza and the same number from pneumonia.

Many in Atlanta

Atlanta Ga. — Five hundred and eight new cases of influenza were reported here today.

Increase at Denver.

Denver, Colo. — Deaths from influenza and pneumonia are daily increasing according to records at the bureau of health. A like condition prevails at the state board of health. Twenty-one deaths occurred here today.

Three Deaths At Pullman

Pullman, Wash. — Three deaths growing out of influenza was the toll of the epidemic at Pullman within the last 24 hours, although the general situation is improving. Baker Wilson Gilbert, prominent farmer, of Johnson; Mrs. Harry Young, wife of a Pullman farmer, and Olphus Howard were the first deaths directly attributable to the influenza epidemic here.

Baker Wilson Gilbert died this morning at 7 o’clock from pneumonia following influenza. He was 33 years of age.

Mrs. Harry Young died from complications due to heart trouble during an attack of pneumonia following influenza. The deceased was 30 years of age and had been afflicted with heart trouble for seven years. She leaves a husband and two children, a boy and a girl. The death occurred last evening.

The first death among the students of the state college was that of Olphus Howard, second year student in the elementary science department and 18-year-old son of Mrs. and Mrs. T. A. Howard of Union Flats. He died last night at the Northwest sanitarium, following pneumonia and influenza. The funeral will take place tomorrow noon, with interment in the South side cemetery. He was a member of the Pullman camp of the Woodmen of the World.
— —

19200206DSM3Schools Open Monday

Moscow schools will open Monday and it is hoped there will be a full attendance of every one who is well. No persons who is not well will be admitted. Nurses will be on hand to make examinations and ascertain if pupils are well enough to attend school. It is urged that all pupils who are not sick attend school, beginning Monday, in order that they may make up for the time lost since the schools closed. This request is made by the school board.
— —

Mrs. Joseph Duffy Joins Her Husband
Woman Loses Brave Fight For Life – Double Funeral To Be Held

Mrs. Joseph L. Duffey, whose husband died more than a week ago after a brief illness with influenza, succumbed to the dread disease Thursday night and the body will be shipped to Centralia where a double funeral will be held Sunday. Mr. Duffey’s body had been shipped to Centralia and the funeral was scheduled for Sunday, but a telegram was sent Friday morning asking that the funeral be postponed until the body of Mrs. Duffey would be sent to be buried with that of her husband and the funeral will be a double one.

The little daughter, Eva, aged 13, is left alone, being the sole survivor of the family of three. Two weeks ago last Sunday Mr. and Mrs. Duffey and daughter took dinner with Mr. and Mrs. R. C. West. Since that time three of the five at the dinner party, Mr. and Mrs. Duffey and Mrs. West, have died and only Mr. West and Eva Duffey are left of the happy diner party, all of whom were in perfect health less than three weeks ago.

Besides her daughter Mrs. Duffey leaves her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Enos Byers, of Troy, four sisters and two brothers. The parents and two of her sisters were with here when the end came.

Mrs. Duffey was 32 years old. For 11 years the family had lived near Orofino but came here last September to send the daughter to school.
— —

Pigeon Brings Accident News

Los Angeles. — One man was killed and 20 were injured, five seriously, yesterday when a heavy truck returning from field maneuvers to the army balloon school at Ross field, near here, overturned on a grade near Mount Wilson. Ambulances with surgeons were rushed to the scene after a carrier pigeon, released from the wreck by a soldier, arrived at Ross field with news of the accident.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 06 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., February 06, 1920, Page 3

City News

Several of the First National bank force have been ill of influenza. F. D. Hawley and Mr. Lenhard have returned to their work after several day’ absence and Mr. Heckathorn and Mr. Reufrew are still confined to their homes but expect to be out in a few days.

Mrs. David Greear returned to her home today at Troy. Her son, Jas. Greear and his family are improving from the attacks of influenza.

Mrs. Andrew Olson of Troy has been in Moscow to care for her daughter, Miss Edith Olson, student at the business college, who has been ill of influenza. Miss Olson is much improved and Mrs. Olson returned to her home today.

Laxative-Aspirin Cold Tablets might keep off the flu. Owl Drug Store [Adv.]
— —

Mrs. Wade Keen’s Mother Dead

Mr. and Mrs. Lafayette Keene have received word of the death of Mrs. Wade Keene’s mother, Mrs. Douglas Hunter, at Spokane. Mr. and Mrs. Hunter, who house is at Peck, Ida., had been visiting four months in Missouri, returning last Saturday to Spokane to visit their daughter, Mrs. Wade Keene. Mr. and Mrs. Hunter were both stricken with influenza, Mrs. Hunter passing away Wednesday evening. The body passed through Moscow today to be taken to Peck for burial. She leaves eight children, all of whom are gown but two, a daughter 11 years of age, and a son of five years. Mr. Hunter is unable to leave Spokane yet. Mrs. Hunter was a sister of Martin Thomas of Juliaetta.

(ibid, page 3)
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The Daily Star-Mirror., February 06, 1920, Page 4

Firemen Are Thanked

Judge W. G. Barge, veteran member of the Moscow fire department, extends his thanks to the firemen for beautiful flowers sent to the Barge home when both Judge and Mrs. Barge were sick with the influenza. “The flowers, certainly brightened the sick room and we feel very grateful to the firemen for their kindness,” said Judge Barge, who is again at his office, looking after business.
— —

D. W. Miller Is Better

Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Patten received a telegram today from their daughter Mrs. D. W. Miller, who is on her way to Chicago, where her husband is ill of influenza, stating that she had heard from Mr. Miller’s father that her husband is getting along nicely and is in no immediate danger.

(ibid, page 4)
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The Kendrick Gazette. February 06, 1920, Page 1

19200206KG1

19200206KG2
Flu Still Continues

There are quite a number of influenza cases in Kendrick at this time, a number of new ones having developed since last week. Fortunately, however, none appear to be serious at all. Among the business men Mr. Lutz and Mr. Joday Long are the only ones to date who have had to desist from their labors until they had had their chills and remained in bed the required length of time.

It seems that most of those who have contracted the disease failed to have it last year. The writer is one of those who was passed up last year and it is needless to say that he is knocking wood at every opportunity, crossing his fingers ever time he passes a white horse and making a detour of the block every time a rabbit starts across the road ahead of him, which causes considerable pedestrying [sic] in this bunny infested town.

Fortunately the people of the community are taking the situation calmly and are taking care of themselves as soon as they contract the disease. Both doctors are going day and night to handle their many patients in town and surrounding country.
— —

Closed Schools Monday

By order of the health officer the Kendrick schools were closed Monday for a period of two weeks. This action was taken on account of the prevalence of scarlet fever and influenza in town. Several cases of scarlet fever developed among some of the younger children and it was thought best to take every precaution by forbidding all public gatherings. While neither scarlet fever nor influenza had developed serious cases, as those who were ill were not in a dangerous condition, but was thought best to use precautions before the epidemic had gotten beyond control.
— —

Over The County

Genesee News

While the flu has spread considerably the past week, the situation seems to be well in hand and there is at present no cause for alarm. From its inception here but a few cases have been reported that have taken a serious turn and these are now reported as on the road to recovery.

All public gatherings of whatever nature have been forbidden, and the people have willingly complied with the order. The school has been kept open, but the attendance is very poor. This is due only partly to the flu, as many children are kept at home on account of it being in the family and in many cases they are kept at home as a precaution. Extra care is being taken at the school to have the rooms well ventilated and children who show any symptoms of illness are asked to remain at home. Two of the teachers have been slightly ill, but they are not ill with flu.

Juliaetta Record

A call meeting of the Red Cross was held at the home of Mrs. T. O Green Wednesday. Quite a number of the members were present and the time was occupied in making a supply of pneumonia jackets. Owing to the rapid spread of the flu and the development of pneumonia in some of the more severe cases the Red Cross wants to be prepared to meet the situation and the ladies made a number of the jackets to have them ready for use in case they are needed.

Troy News

The news is rather devoid of local news this week, owing to sickness in our family. The “flu” has had us down this week and it is only through strained efforts that we are getting out this issue. We hope there will be no occasion for such apologies in the future.
— —

Mrs. Frank Thompson

Mrs. Frank Thompson, a pioneer resident of Potlatch ridge, died at her home in Southwick, Sunday evening. Death was caused by influenza and was quite sudden. Her death seems particularly sad on account of the fact that her husband was in a Moscow hospital at the time, where he had undergone an operation, one of his feet having been amputated a few days prior to his wife’s death.

Mrs. and Mrs. Thompson have resided in and around Southwick the greater part of the past twenty-five years, during which time they were engaged in farming.

The funeral service was held at the Methodist church at Southwick last Tuesday.
— —

Mrs. A. D. Hunter

Mrs. A. D. Hunter of Peck, sister of Mrs. Ben Callison and M. V. Thomas, died at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Wade Keen in Spokane, Wednesday night. Death was caused from pneumonia resulting from influenza. [age 48] …
— —

Death of Ellen Emmett

Ellen Emmett, the twelve-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Emmett, died at the White hospital in Lewiston, Sunday morning. She had been taken to the hospital some time ago on account of serious illness and a short time prior to her death contracted influenza which resulted in death.

The funeral service was held on Bear Ridge at the Wild Rose cemetery. No church service could be held because of the influenza epidemic. Rev. Hood had charge of the service.

Ellen Emmett is survived by her father and mother, four sisters and two brothers.

The deepest sympathy has been expressed for the family in their hour of bereavement.
— —

Viola May Nichols

The funeral of Viola May Nichols, age 13, a victim of pneumonia, following influenza, was held Tuesday afternoon at the Merchant chapel at Clarkston and interment took place in the Clarkston cemetery. Rev. N. J. Holm, pastor of the Norwegian Lutheran church had charge of the services.

Viola was the only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Leonard H. Nicols, who moved to Clarkston from Texas ridge a few weeks ago. Mrs. Nichols is said to be very ill with pneumonia. …
— —

Influenza Victim at Moscow

John H. Rich, city superintendent of schools at Moscow, died Saturday night from pneumonia resulting from influenza. Mr. Rich was stricken about a week before his death and both he and his wife were taken to a local hospital for treatment. Mr. Rich was about 38 years of age and had been at the head of the Moscow schools for the past three years, having served three years as principal of the high school, prior to that time.
— —

City Fathers Meet

At the regular meeting of the Town Council held at the hall Tuesday night, the general routine of business was transacted. A number of matters concerning the welfare of the town were discussed but no definite action taken. …
— —

19200206KG3
The Flu Patient

At the last meeting of the American Public Health Association men from all parts of the country were present to deal with the “flu” problem in a scientific way. The “I know it is all spirit” was not present, for all were anxious to learn. It was generally conceded that the epidemic as the result of a disease of extreme communicability; furthermore, that it was not possible to tell when a person having the disease ceased to be capable of transmitting it to others.

Our greatest concern at the present moment is closing the door of communication, but for those who have been unfortunate enough to contract the disease the feeding of the patient is of common interest. The patients usually can be classed as follows:

1. Fever patients require – Liquid diet.

2. Normal temperature patients require – Soft diet.

3. Convalescent patients require – Light diet.

Miss Katherin Jensen, Professor of Home Economics, suggests the following foods as typical for each class.

Liquid Diet — Feed 3 hours from 5 a.m. to 11 p.m. Milk (hot or cold), cocoa, milk, chicken broth, egg nog, gruels, beef froth, lemonade, egg lemonade.

Soft Diet 3 meals a day — Light lunch forenoon and afternoon. Cereals (well cooked), toast, butter, milk, eggs soft cooked, poached custards, cream soups, rice, baked potato, cornstarch pudding, baked apple.

Light Diet — Cereals (well cooked), toast, bread, cocoa, tea, coffee, soups, eggs, potato, rice, squash, roast chicken, fresh or stewed fruits, puddings (tapioca, rice, bread.)

For the fever patient it is necessary to give easily digested food in small quantities that there may be no disturbance of digestive or absorptive functions. One cup of any one of the foods named in the liquid diet list is sufficient for one feeding. There is a great tendency also of overfeeding the patient who has been placed on soft diet list (temperature normal).

Typical menu for patient on soft diet:

5:30 a.m. — Cream of wheat, 3/4 cup; top milk, 1/3 cup; toast 1 slice; butter 1 pat; milk cocoa 3/4 cup.

9:45 a.m. — Cream tomato soup, 3/4 cup; crackers 2; toast, one slice; soft cooked egg 1; Brown Betty 1/2 cup; tea, 3/4 cup.

2:45 p.m. — Gruel, 1 cup.

5:30 p.m. — Pea puree, 1/2 cup; baked potato 1; toast, 1 slice; butter, 1 pat; apple tapioca; milk, 1 glass.

source: The Kendrick Gazette. (Kendrick, Idaho), 06 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Kendrick Gazette. February 06, 1920, Page 8

Gleanings

It is a good idea during the flu and scarlet fever epidemics to be careful not to exaggerate conditions. The first of the week a young lady phoned to a party in the country and stated that the town was alive with scarlet fever. When she hung up a man who overheard the conversation asked how many cases there were in town. She said there were three that she knew of. At present there are four homes quarantined for scarlet fever and the quarantine is being rigidly observed, so there is not very much danger of a serious increase of the epidemic. So far as influenza is concerned it seems to make little difference what precautions are taken. The main thing is to keep in good physical condition so that if you contract the disease you will have it in a light form.

Will Stump of Southwick was reported seriously ill yesterday. He contracted influenza but did not use the proper care while recovering and had a relapse. His mother, who was caring for him, is also quite ill from an attack of the disease. Allen, Will’s brother, arrived from Lewiston Wednesday.

Mr. and Mrs. M. V. Thomas returned from Spokane last week. While there they both had the flu but recovered before returning home.

The funeral of Samuel Sletto, the barber at Troy, was held Tuesday. Mr. Sletto’s death was caused by influenza.

John L. Waide went to Troy the latter part of last week to take charge of the business of the Idaho Bean & Elevator Co., during the absence of Frank Green who was ill with the flu. John had to remain at home this week as his family all contracted the disease.

The public school at Juliaetta was closed the first of the week until the flu situation there shows decided improvement.

The flu in and around Cavendish and Teakean is going the rounds and there are a number of severe cases. Gorden Harris and family have all been taken ill with the disease. Mrs. Ed Choate is just recovering from an attack of pneumonia. All schools and public meetings have been discontinued until further notice. Mrs. Claude King is quite ill from an attack of the disease as are all of the Fred Daniels family.
— —

Big Bear Ridge

The Steele, Taney and Fern Hill schools are closed temporarily on account of the flu epidemic.

Miss Della Wilson has gone to her home in Lewiston to remain until her school will be opened.

Mrs. A. Kleth and children are home from Kendrick until the school reopens there.

Dr. Faust of Deary was called to the Rufus May home Sunday, their little daughter, Gertude, being seriously ill with the flu which had developed into pneumonia.

There are numerous flu cases on this ridge and all are recovering at this writing.

Miss Flora Nelson spent last week in Deary, with her brother Albert who is recovering from a severe attack of the mumps.

Tom Whybark is at the home of his sister, Mrs. George Eacker on Texas ridge, and is recovering from a relapse of the mumps.

Miss Mayme Slind is ill with the mumps.

News items are scare articles of late as people do not venture very far from home.

(ibid, page 8)
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Cottonwood Chronicle. February 06, 1920, Page 1

19200206CC1

Public School Closed

The public school has been closed the past week owing to illness among a large number of the pupils and teachers. Superintendent Lustie who was taken down last week is again able to be out. In all probability school will again resume next Monday if conditions continue to improve.
— —

19200206CC2
Flu Appears To Be On Decline
Grangeville Has Been Hit Exceptionally Hard

Influenza, the most dangerous and treacherous disease, that has taken the country as a whole in many years, appears to be on a decline in Cottonwood and vicinity at the present time. While Cottonwood is far from being free from the malady most of the cases here have been in a mild form with the exception of perhaps some four or five cases. At the present time in Cottonwood, T. C. Keith, manager of the Cottonwood Mercantile Co., is the only one effected with the disease who is in a critical condition. Mr. Keith has been hovering between life and death for the past four days and it is hoped that he may be able to withstand the attack of the disease. Mrs. Keith, who has been taking care of her husband is also ill with the flu, but in no critical condition.

12 In One Family

The Keuterville section, has not been as fortunate as the Cottonwood section and while there has been but one death there. Mrs. Charles Mader, there are several homes where the entire family are bedfast with the disease. The Foresman family has 12 members of its family in bed and the Mader family some 8 or 9.

County Seat Hit Hard

Grangeville has lost some of its most prominent citizens, the past week from the flu. Among those who died there are: Mrs. Roy Nail, Mrs. Geo. Manning, John Howard, George Stanbery, and Mrs. Henry Kurthuis. The obituary of the deceased are given by the Idaho County Free Press as follows:

Mrs. Addie Alice Nail

The first victim of the present influenza epidemic in Grangeville was Mrs. Addie Alice Nail, wife of Roy E. Nail. Mrs. Nail died Saturday morning in her home, after an illness of but a few days. [age 33] …

Mrs. Ethel Manning

Influenza claimed another victim at 7:15 Sunday morning when Mrs. Ethel Manning, wife of George W. Manning, died in her home in this city, after an illness of ten days’ duration. She was 37 years old. …

John Grant Howard

John Grant Howard, 48 years old, a well-known Camas Prairie rancher, died of influenza-pneumonia, Monday morning in the Alcorn hospital, in Grangeville. Mr. Howard was stricken a week before he died. …

George David Stanbery

George David Stanbery is dead. Big hearted, jovial Dave Stanbery is no more. He has fallen victim to influenza. Death came to him at 2 Tuesday morning in his home in this city, after a brief illness of influenza-pneumonia. [age 49] …

Mrs. Trientje Kurthuis

Mrs. Trientje Kurthuis, wife of Henry Kurthuis, died early Wednesday morning in her home, two miles north of Grangeville. Death was caused by pneumonia following influenza. [age 35] …
— —

Death Of Mrs. Mader

Mrs. Charles Mader, the mother of eight children, died at her home in the Keuterville section Wednesday from pneumonia following influenza. Mrs. Mader, as well as her entire family were down with the flu, and owing to this fact, we have been unable to obtain little of their family history. She was about 45 years of age and is survived by her husband and 8 children. The Mader family are old time pioneers of the Keuterville section. The funeral was conducted from the Catholic church at Keuterville Thursday morning. A. H. Nau supplied the funeral furnishings.
— —

E. Pfennebecker Dead

Elmer Pfennebecker died at the Hotel de France from pneumonia following influenza. He was first stricken with influenza about a week ago and pneumonia developed a few days later. He had been a sufferer from heart trouble for the greater part of the winter.

Mr. Pfennebecker was about 28 years of age and is survived by parents in Iowa, his father now being en route to Lewiston to take charge of the remains. An uncle and cousins reside in the Greencreek section. He was employed in the timber during the summer and fall and had been about Lewiston much of the time during the winter. He was a young man of pleasing personality and had made many friends about the hotel. – Lewiston Tribune.

The remains of the young man were shipped to his old home in Iowa for burial.
— —

Died At Lewiston

W. R. Dixon, a former resident of this section died at Lewiston Tuesday at the home of his son-in-law John Evans, the cause of the death being kidney trouble and influenza. The funeral services were held at Clarkston Wednesday.

source: Cottonwood Chronicle. (Cottonwood, Idaho), 06 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Cottonwood Chronicle. February 06, 1920, Page 2

County Seat News Items

Owing to prevalence of Spanish influenza, Judge Scales has postponed for one week the opening of the February term of district court in Lewis county. Court was scheduled to convene in Nezperce next Monday.

Quite a number of people are absent from their usual places of business this week on account of sickness. Some have contracted the “flu” and others who have slight colds are remaining inside to administer the proper treatment and to avoid contact with the disease while in a receptive mood. A good idea.

(ibid, page 2)
— — — —

Cottonwood Chronicle. February 06, 1920, Page 6

[Local]

Travel on the Grangeville – Lewiston train has been exceptionally light the past week, due perhaps to the influenza epidemic which is prevailing in various sections of the country.

The Orpheum Theatre was forced to close this week on account of Grangeville and Nezperce having cancelled their pictures during the flu epidemic. As Cottonwood is on the same circuit with the above named towns it was almost prohibitive in a financial way for the Orpheum to continue to run.

Sheriff Wiliam Eller who the first of the week was reported to be critically ill at Grangeville with the flu is reported to be greatly improved and considered to be out of danger at the present writing, which is welcomning [sic] news to his many friends in Cottonwood.

Leo Simon who has been attending an auto school at Spokane for the past three months returned home Saturday evening. Leo intended to remain for about three weeks longer but owing to the fact that he contracted the flu he decided to come home to recuperate. He had a very hard tussle with the malady.

John Rooke departed Saturday morning for Lewiston to act in the capacity of nurse for his brother Will, who while at Lewiston was taken down with the flu and for several days was very sick. Bill is now out of danger and his brother John is now afflicted with the malady. Both gentlemen are now at the St. Joseph hospital.

Miss Leasel Hussman and Miss Beatrice Calhoun, 2 of the Pacific Telephone Co’s operators in this city were called to Grangeville Sunday evening to do relief work at the Grangeville office, the county seat operators all being ill with influenza. Mrs. Bert Schroeder and Miss Hattrup are filing the vacancies of the two regular operators.

Another six weeks must elapse before spring can come to Cottonwood Mr. Groundhog waking lazily Monday from his long sleep, stalked forth to see what he could see. All day long the sun shown forth and the groundhog saw a long, lank, lean shadow and forthwith he scampered back into his hole for another nap.

For prices on chickens see T. Clarke, the junk man.

(ibid, page 6)
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Hoban’s Cabins, Osburn, Idaho

OsburnFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

The Idaho Recorder. February 06, 1920, Page 1

19200206IR1

19200206IR2
Health Officer Reports Total Flu Cases Are 53

Dr. Hanmer, health officer, reports the reappearance of influenza in remote localities of Lemhi county.

Shoup is the worst sufferer, with a total of 32 cases in two families but representing almost the entire population of the community.

Ulysses comes next with 13 cases in six families, while at Northfork there are eight cases in three families.

Dr. Hanmer was summoned to the Pashimaroi valley this morning to meet with Dr. Kirtley, health officer of Custer. The two physicians will act jointly in taking whatever preventative measures may be necessary to protect that community.

[?] … reported that flu has broken out at Patterson.

Dr. Hanmer tells The Recorder that he has already quarantined both Shoup and Ulysses as communities and also as to dwellings where the epidemic is known to exist, while at Northfork the same action has been taken with respect to the dwellings and individual cases.
— —

19200206IR3Ready To Combat Flu Epidemic If It Comes

The historical committee members were hostesses to the Woman’s Club at the home of Mrs. Wm. Osborne, the chairman, on last Thursday afternoon, the regular meeting day. Mrs. Stringfellow, club president, was in the chair for the transaction of business. Miss Laura Shoup of the Red Cross reported plans for taking care of the flu patients in case the epidemic returns to Salmon. The cooperation of the Woman’s club is asked in fitting up an emergency hospital, in supplying bed linens, etc., and volunteer nurses in case the need arises.

… Just fifty ladies enjoyed the hospitality of the afternoon, forty-six of whom were club members, the other four being invited guests. …
— —

A Meteor On Its Way

An illumination in the sky, above the brightness of an arc light, flashed through the heavens last Sunday night. Apparently the light shot downward from the zenith with a tail half as long as the whole space traversed. The same occurrence is reported in the Leadore column of this paper. Nobody has found where it landed if it landed anywhere. But wherever it was going it reached its stopping place in a mightily little space of time.

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 06 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Idaho Recorder. February 06, 1920, Page 2

19200206IR4Confiscated Booze Is Needed To Fight Flu
Many Deaths Reported From Chicago – Six Hundred New York Policemen Unable to Work

Chicago, Jan. 29. — Influenza caused 87 deaths in the last 24 hours, the health department announced. New cases of influenza during the same period numbered 1,472 and pneumonia cases 400.

United States District Attorney C. F. Clyne announced last night that an effort will be made today to have hundreds of cases of liquors seized by the government in recent raids distributed to the hospitals for use in fighting the epidemic.

New York. Jan. 29. — Six hundred policemen and between 200 and 300 firemen were unable to report for duty yesterday because of influenza.

Topeka, Kan., Jan. 29. — Seven hundred and seventy-eight new cases of influenza were reported to the state board of health yesterday from all parts of the state, bringing the total so far reported to 2,982. The disease is prevalent in 77 of the 105 counties.

Halifax, N. S., Jan. 29. — Three thousand Chinese coolies bound home from France are being held on board the steamer Minnekahda here until the military authorities and the chief health officers of the port settle their dispute as to whether the illness of some of them is influenza or colds.

Bremerton, Wash., Jan. 29. — Influenza at the Puget sound navy yard has sent 180 men of the battleship division, Pacific fleet, to the hospital during the last few days, it became known yesterday. One death was reported.

Omaha, Jan. 29. — Ninety-seven new cases of influenza were reported at the city health office Tuesday, with 34 yesterday. No additional deaths were reported.

St. Paul, Jan. 29. — One hundred and fifty-two cases of influenza and six deaths were reported to the health department yesterday.

(ibid, page 2)
— — — —

The Idaho Recorder. February 06, 1920, Page 3

Idaho State News

A mild form of influenza has appeared at Lewiston and the authorities are taking precautions to keep the disease checked. No serious cases are reported.

In a week’s work in Madison county, 345 cattle were tested for tuberculosis and no reactors were found.

Idaho and Utah are to be allotted regiments in the regular army, according to information received by the Boise recruiting station.

(ibid, page 3)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Oakley Herald. February 06, 1920, Page 1

19200206OH1

Locals

Milford Bates, son of E. L. Bates, died at his home in Basin Tuesday, Feb. 3, after a short illness of influenza.

Mrs. W. T. Jack and son Calvin each suffered a relapse and have been quite sick for some time. Calvin was near the point of death for several days but both are now reported to be improving.

Mayor Geo. A. Day experienced a serious illness while in Salt Lake City to attend the Wool Growers meeting last week. After his return home he suffered a slight relapse but is now up and about again.

The Herald force craves the indulgence of its readers this week. The Editor has been ill, and unable to take any part in the editing or publishing of this issue.
— —

Vipont News

By The Kitten

A few bad colds among the people at the mine, but owing to the diligent efforts of Dr. Thorn who generously dispenses pills and painkiller all are on the improved.

All are well at the mill with the exception of Jackson who is suffering with a young case of La Grippe. But Jack says it takes more than La Grippe to kill a marine. We hope so.

source: The Oakley Herald. (Oakley, Idaho), 06 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Oakley Herald. February 06, 1920, Page 6

Local Mention

L. A. Critchfield and Dr. Neilson have rented the old postoffice building and fitted it up for a flu hospital in case conditions become so critical that patients cannot be cared for in their homes. Quite a number of cases have developed the past week. The quarantine is being rigidly enforced, show houses have been asked to suspend for a time, and every effort is being made to prevent the further spread of the disease.

(ibid, page 6)
— — — — — — — — — —

Montpelier Examiner. February 06, 1920, Page 1

19200206ME1

19200206ME2Death Angel Calls At Many Homes
Ten Deaths in the County the Past Week – From One Home the Father and Mother are Both Taken, Leaving Six Children

The Grim Reaper has been exceedingly busy in Bear Lake county during the past week, there having been ten deaths since the last issue of the Examiner. Of these, eight have been caused by the flu or pneumonia resulting from the disease.

The deaths in their order, as near as we have been able to get them are as follows: Mrs. Amos Grimes of Paris, Wilson Blaine of Georgetown; Mrs. Edward Bischoff of Geneva; Stanley, the three-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. E. T. Shepherd of Paris; Pearl, nine-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Milford Birch; John Williams, Mrs. George A. Sparks, Mrs. John Williams, Ester Schmid and the four-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Gustave Graff. The last six deaths occurred in Montpelier.

Besides these deaths two former residents of Montpelier have died within the past week. They were Mrs. Wm. H. Stanton of Salt Lake, who died last Friday morning from pneumonia. The deceased was formerly Arline Rose, daughter of the late F. W. and Amelia Rose, who were residents of Montpelier for a number of years. She was 28 years of age. She is survived by her husband and one child.

Wednesday afternoon Mrs. Josephine Driver received a telegram announcing the death of Mrs. Chas. Sweet at Hollywood, Cal., where Mr. and Mrs. Sweet and the latter’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Hutchins, were spending the winter. Death was caused from pneumonia. The deceased will be remembered by all of the old time citizens of the city and county, as Ethel Hutchins. She came here with her parents when two year of age, and lived here until ten years ago when the family removed to Salt Lake.

She is survived by her parents, one brother, one sister, her husband and one daughter eighteen year old. Her funeral services will be held next Sunday morning and the remains will be buried at Hollywood.

Mrs. Edward Bischoff died at her home in Geneva last Monday morning at 11 o’clock. Death resulted from hemorrhage following child birth. Deceased was the daughter of George and Anna Blechert and was 35 years of age. She had lived in Geneva practically all of her life. Besides her parents, she is survived by her husband, one son and three daughters, including the babe of a few hours for whom she gave her life. Her funeral services were held at the Geneva meeting house yesterday afternoon at 2 o’clock.

Pearl Arline, the nine-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Milford Birch, died at 3 o’clock last Tuesday morning. Last year Pearl was the only member of the family who escaped the influenza. She was taken down with the disease about a week prior to her death, and although she had been very ill for several days, it was thought she had passed the danger period, when the end came unexpectedly, the disease having suddenly affected her heart. She is survived by her parents, two brothers and one sister. Her funeral services were held from the Third ward meeting house this morning at 11 o’clock.

The dreaded flu claimed another victim Monday afternoon in the person of John Williams, who died at the Montpelier hospital after an illness of less than one week.

Another extremely and features in connection with his death was the fact that Mrs. Williams was at the point of death at her home, and four of their six children were also ill with the flu. In less than 48 hours after Mr. Williams’ death, the spirit of Mrs Williams’ took flight to join that of her husband in the Great Beyond.

Mr. Williams was the son of Jacob Williams. He was born at Pittsburgh, Pa., Oct. 26, 1881, but had been a resident of Montpelier since boyhood. He had been in the service of the Short Line at various times, and was working in the car repair department when taken down with his illness. …

Mrs. Williams was 31 years of age last December. She was the daughter of John Jewett, who survives her, together with her step mother, under who casr she was raised. She also leaves one sister, Mrs. George Hunter of this city.

By the death of Mr. and Mrs. Williams six children are made orphans. The oldest are twin boys nine year old and the youngest is only 16 months.

Short funeral services for the husband [and] wife were held at the cemetery yesterday morning at 11 o’clock and the remains were consigned to their final resting place side by side.

Never in the history of Montpelier has a sadder affair occurred. The relatives, and six children none of whom are old enough to fully realize that they have for all time been deprived of the care and love of their father and mother, have the deepest sympathy of the entire community.

Tuesday afternoon another extremely sad death occurred when Mrs. George A. Sparks passed away after a week’s illness with the flu. She was the daughter of Joe Lewis, one of the pioneers of the county and was born at Paris 27 years ago. The family later moved to Dingle. There she grew to woman hood and about ten years ago was married to George A. Sparks. They have resided in this city for the past year.

Besides her husband and four little children, she is survived by her mother, Mrs. Mary Lewis, two brothers and three sisters.

Her funeral services will be held at the Second ward meeting house this afternoon.

Tuesday evening at 8 o’clock Miss Ezda Schmid died at the home of her mother, Mrs. Jake Jensen. Death was caused from pneumonia following the flu. Deceased was a native of Montpelier, having been born here 22 years ago last January. She is survived by her mother, two brothers and two sisters.

Miss Schmid was a very popular young lady and a great many of the young people of the community join with the bereaved mother, sisters and brothers in mourning her early and untimely death.

Her funeral services will be held at the Second ward meeting house this afternoon a 2 o’clock.

William the four-year-old son of Mrs. and Mrs. Gustave Graff, died from pneumonia Wednesday night. Funeral services will be held some time tomorrow.

source: Montpelier Examiner. (Montpelier, Idaho), 06 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Montpelier Examiner. February 06, 1920, Page 4

[Editorial Page]

19200206ME3The Flu Situation Is Greatly Improved

The Examiner is please to state that the flu situation in Montpelier is greatly improved. Yesterday only one home was placed under quarantine and ten or more were released. This morning there were only 34 homes under quarantine as compared with 45 a week ago.

The thing for people to do now is to go about their business in the usual way and think and talk about the influenza as little as possible. Be normal and sensible, but take good care of yourself and in another week business will be going along as tho the disease had never struck Montpelier.
— —

Card Of Thanks

We desire to extend more sincere thanks to those who rendered assistance during the illness and after the deaths of our beloved son, daughter and brother. Words can only feebly express the gratitude we feel to all.

Jacob Williams and Family
John Jewett and Family.
— —

Paris

Paris, Feb. 4. — A sad death occurred here Sunday morning when the young wife of Mr. Amos Grimes died after an illness of but a few hours. Mr. and Mrs. Grimes have made many friends during their short residence here, and the sudden death of the young woman came as a distinct shock. The body was taken to Missouri for burial.

Another home was saddened Monday morning, when the three-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Edwin T. Shepherd passed away. The little boy had been suffering from a severe cold and cough for a month and complications which caused his death finally set in. Open air funeral services were held Wednesday at the home. Smith Hoge and Arthur Pendrey were the speakers. Both spoke consolingly to the bereaved family. Music was furnished by Russel Shepherd, Alfred Shepherd, Elva Law, and Veda Low. Bishop Morris D. Low took charge of the services.

Priesthood meetings which were held here last Saturday were largely attended in spite of the influenza scare and bad roads.

All public gatherings have been prohibited here pending further action next Monday. The spread of influenza throughout the valley and the number of cases reported in town have made this action seem imperative. About half a dozen cases are reported in Paris.

The meteor which lit up the valley and fell in Bear Lake last Sunday evening caused much interest and some excitement. Scores of people were interested spectators in the phenomena.
— —

Fielding Academy

Owing to the spread of the influenza, and the Paris order closing all public gatherings, the Academy has been forced to close down at least until Monday. Many students have returned to their homes while many are still in town awaiting further decisions as to the opening of the school again.

(ibid, page 4)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Idaho Republican. February 06, 1920, Page 1

19200206TIR1

19200206TIR2
Maurice Watson Dies of Influenza

Maurice Watson departed this life at the Blackfoot hospital on Wednesday afternoon, February 4, after a brief illness with influenza. He is survived by his wife and a host of friends who have known him from boyhood.

Mr. Watson’s parents came to this locality when he was a child and he has been a resident of the county practically all of the time. He has buried his father, mother and sister here, the mother having passed away only a few months ago.

Arrangements for the funeral have not yet been announced.
— —

19200206TIR3Volunteer Nurses

In a number of influenza cases in Blackfoot and surrounding territory nursing service is needed, and available nurses are asked to list their names with Mrs. George Holbrook at the city hall or with W. B. Goodnough at the Goodnough Cleaning & Tailoring Co. if they desire to volunteer to take cases where help is required.
— —

Musical Postponed

The L. D. S. Glee club which was to have appeared here in the near future has postponed its performance on account of the flu epidemic. The club will probably be heard in March according to W. B. Goodnough.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 06 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

American Falls Press. February 06, 1920, Page 1

19200206AFP1

19200206AFP2Red Cross Wants Volunteers For Call During Flu Season

Mrs. R. F. Noth, acting for the Power county chapter of the Red Cross, has issued a call for volunteer workers to assist during the influenza epidemic. All who can devote any of their time to helping families or cases in distress are asked to give their names to Mrs. Noth who will call them only when urgently needed. The Red Cross is straining every effort to meet all its obligations during the present situation and will appreciate every form of assistance given.
— —

Back To School Drive Postponed Indefinitely

The visit of E. A Bryan and President Lindley of the University of Idaho, and their party was indefinitely postponed early in the week because of the severity of the influenza epidemic in other cities of the valley. Many towns forbid public meetings and the tour will be conducted at a later date when the situation is more favorable.
— —

19200206AFP3Woman’s Club Suspends During “Flu” Rampage

Mrs. R. E. Austin announced today that the Woman’s club will not meet again until there is less illness in the town. The influenza epidemic has spread to every section of the city and attendance at meetings it is believed will increase the danger from the contagion.
— —

19200206AFP4
Influenza On The Wane

Present indications are that the peak of the influenza epidemic has been passed over. The city schools are operating on a more nearly normal basis and calls for assistance seem to be diminishing daily. It is estimated, however, that there are still 200 cases of “flu” in town with the prospect that it will be several weeks before the epidemic is completely cleared away.

Almost the only exception to the general mildness of the cases thus far, is the case of Mrs. R. L. Ross, wife of Rev. Ross of the Baptist church. She was in a very critical condition yesterday afternoon and had shown no improvement over the day before.

Public meetings scheduled for the southern counties of Idaho have been postponed indefinitely. Rupert, Burley and other towns on the branch lines have cancelled dates making it necessary for the cancellation of other dates from American Falls north.

The city council in regular meeting Tuesday evening declined to take any action that would restrict activity among the schools, the theaters or churches. The danger from public gatherings was not deemed of sufficient importance to warrant any action.

source: American Falls Press. (American Falls, Idaho), 06 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

American Falls Press. February 06, 1920, Page 5

School Notes

by Alvin Reading

The high school play has been postponed owing to the illness of some of those who are to take part in it.

About half of the school has been absent this week owing to the “flu.” None, however, are very serious.
— —

Rockland

Miss Edith Alvord went to American Falls when the school closed and returned after the ban was lifted to resume her work in the school room.

(ibid, page 5)
— — — — — — — — — —

McCammon State Bank & Investment Co’s Store, McCammon, Idaho

McCammonFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. February 06, 1920, Page 1

19200206CT1

Widely Known Youth Answers Final Call

Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at the Peckam chapel for Bazel Gurwell, one of the well known young men of Caldwell who died Sunday following an attack of pleural pneumonia. The Rev. G. C. Runciman conducted the services. Interment was in Canyon hill.

Mr. Gurwell was born in Gem, Kansas, August 20, 1899. He was the only son of Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Gurwell who have made their home here for a number of years. Besides his parents, Mr. Gurwell is survived by Mrs. Ellen Brody, Mrs. Nellie Spencer and Mrs. Hazel Swedland, three sisters, all of whom live in Caldwell.

source: The Caldwell Tribune. (Caldwell, Idaho), 06 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. February 06, 1920, Page 3

Local And Personal

The local emergency hospital, for which the Palace rooms are being utilized, is almost taxed to capacity with influenza patients. Miss Djupe, county school nurse with the farm bureau organization, has charge of the work being done there. She has issued a call for additional volunteer nurses.

Miss Louise Riddle, county home demonstration agent, is among those who are ill with influenza.

A. E. Oman, assistant county agent is ill with the influenza.

Mrs. Joe Erwin is ill at her home on Chicago street.

Word was received in Caldwell last Tuesday of the death of Mrs. R. C. Pasley of pneumonia following influenza. Mrs. Pasley has been spending some time in Arizona while her husband is in the east on a purchasing trip. They left Caldwell together some time ago, Mrs. Pasley accompanying her husband a portion of the way east before leaving for the south. Mr. Pasley is the local manager of the Golden Rule store.

Mrs. J. L. Streets has been spending some time in the Riverside community caring for members of the McCluskey family, several of whom have been ill.

Several employees of the Commercial bank are ill with influenza.
— —

19200206CT2
County Agent Asks Help To Fight Disease
Farm Bureau Makes Appeal For Nurses To Care For Increasing Number of Cases

Appeal for help in combating the influenza epidemic which is rapidly spreading throughout the county, has been made by the farm bureau for such persons as can aid in caring for victims. No especial training is necessary to volunteer for this work since the plan is not so much to provide expert nursing as it is to see that every person ill with the disease has some sort of care. At present there are many comparatively mild cases of influenza which may not result seriously but it is believed that by giving such patients reasonable care, any possibility of serious effects will be eliminated. It is pointed out that there are many such cases in need of care, even of the simplest kind.

Services of both men and women will be entirely acceptable. Red Cross funds will probably be used to further this work. Those who would be willing to carry on this work are urged to get in touch with the local farm bureau office.

Following is a letter that has been sent from the farm bureau office to all project leaders:

Dear Friend:

The policy of the farm bureau is to render assistance to the farmers within the county. Aid in the case of sickness and want is of a higher order than any heretofore rendered by our organization.

During the present influenza epidemic which is rapidly increasing, entire families are afflicted and are with out assistance in the house or in caring for stock. The spirit of helpfulness within our community which reaches out to those in trouble will do more towards developing the genuine community spirit than years of toil and propaganda.

This letter is being sent to all community project leaders, you should take it upon yourself to see that there are no families in your section suffering from lack of neighborly attention.

Doctors and nurses are badly rushed and the supply of available nurses is getting short. Information as to the names of nurses and where they may be secured will be of value to the farm bureau office in our mission of helpfulness.

The many new families which have moved into our communities and are without friends should be given special care and attention. In case any family is in need of help which can not be supplied by your neighborhood, the farm bureau office will endeavor to see that aid is supplied.

Let us do unto others as we would that they should do unto us and do it first.

Yours for a strong campaign against the common fore.

G. W. Dewey, County Agri. Agent.

(ibid, page 3)
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. February 06, 1920, Page 5

Interesting Items from Surrounding Territory

Pleasant Ridge

Mr. George Springer was called to the C. A. Bartch home near Middleton last week to assist in caring for the Burtch family who were all down with influenza.

Basil Gurwell died of pneumonia Sunday night at ten o’clock at the home of his sister, Mrs. Brody in Caldwell after a brief illness. The Gurwell family and relatives have the sympathy of the entire community in their bereavement.

Lake View

Mr. S. R. Tucker has been very ill with influenza but is somewhat better now.

Dr. Montgomery was called out to the H. S. Salisbury home last Saturday.

The Orville Shaw family have all been down with the influenza but are better at this writing.

Marjory Kendall was home from school on account of sickness Tuesday.

Roswell

Miss Bertha Rock was called to Twin Falls last week by the illness of her sister and family.

Supt. W. E. Goodell and Miss Vannie Lister who were ill last week with the epidemic are now able to be back at their school duties.

Mrs. Anna Laude was quite ill early in the week with the influenza.

Lester Green who was seriously ill with influenza and complications is slightly improved.

Miss Rowena Hammond of Boise came Sunday to help care for her sister, Mrs. E. W. Rockwood and family who are all ill with the influenza.

Miss Winnie Fouch who was nursing influenza patients at the Lawrence Wamstead place is now ill with the epidemic.

Mrs. Tom Rooney, who has been seriously ill, is slightly improved.

(ibid, page 5)
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. February 06, 1920, Page 7

Wilder

There is much sickness in Wilder and the vicinity from influenza and small pox.

Miss Hazel Foley, the efficient postmistress is confined to her home with the influenza.

Old Time dance which was to have been given on Friday evening was postponed for two weeks.

(ibid, page 7)
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. February 06, 1920, Page 10

Items of Interest From Surrounding Territory

Marble Front

Most everyone in this community is suffering from the influenza.

Mrs. J. L. Baker has gone to Wilder to care for her two daughters who are seriously ill at that place.

Roy Livesay have taken a relapse after the influenza and is very ill at this writing.

Miss Luella Painter is nursing in Caldwell this week.

Mrs. A. D. King has gone to Caldwell to help care for the sick.

The entire community was shocked Tuesday to hear of the death of little Archie Lee White, who passed into the great beyond last Monday evening. The remains were laid to rest in the Star cemetery Tuesday. This entire neighborhood extends Mr. and Mrs. Ira white and family their sympathy.

The many friends of Ira Vassar will be sorry to learn that he is still very ill at this writing.

Miss Ethel Bales spent Tuesday evening with Mrs. Emery Bales. The school Miss Bales was teaching at Meridian was dismissed on account of poor attendance only about 50 per cent were present.

Canyon

The influenza seems to be rapidly disappearing from this district. Mr. Houdyshell and family are much improved, Mr. Long and Mr. Grubb are better, and all, so far as heard from are gaining.

This visitation of the dreaded disease brought out many manifestations of the friendly feeling among the neighbors. Carl Hammar made himself especially useful in caring for the Harmon family and the Fitts family. With his own stock to care for his time was completely occupied from six a.m. till eight p.m.

School opened on Monday.

Fairview

There is several cases of influenza in this vicinity now. The Landreth family have it, Mrs. Thompson has had a severe case, one of the Hulbert children went home from school last Friday night sick and there are several cases in lower Dixie.

Mrs. Conklin was in Central Cove the first of the week caring for her daughter Mrs. Vanslyke who has the influenza.

W. W. Vails whole family are down with the influenza, also M. Gales family.

(ibid, page 10)
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. February 06, 1920, Page 11

Items of Interest From Surrounding Territory

Lake Lowell

Mrs. G. C. White went to Boise Sunday morning in response to a message stating that her little brother Roland had died of pneumonia.

There were no services Sunday at the M. E. church on account of so much sickness in the neighborhood.

Lois Coon missed school several days on account of sickness.

Roy Gibbons and family have the influenza.

Harry Coon has been on the sick list the past few days.

Mrs. McAdams is staying at the Arthur Vogt home and caring for the influenza patients.

W. L. Gibbons returned home Saturday from Meridian where he has been helping care for a brother, Mr. Gibbons was called there again on Sunday.

The weeks family are recovering from their recent illness.

Grandma Kimes came over from Boise to help care for her son and family who have been suffering with the influenza.

Maple Grove

We like all other localities are having our full share of sickness. We all will rejoice to see “Old Sol” shine out again with his brightness and his warmth and drive away this fog.

J. H. Chambers’ family are entertaining small pox, influenza and the mumps. Mrs. Chambers has been very sick.

Five of the Northroup family who have been having the influenza are convalescing.

Our hearts were saddened to hear of the death of Mrs. Fillimore due to pneumonia following the influenza. The sympathy of the community is extended to the family.

The Woodhouse home is quite a hospital as all the family are ill. Geo. Smith is helping them.

Mr. and Mrs. R. A. Smith are getting better after both being ill.

Alden Garvin has been confined to his home several days due to sickness.

Lifelet Simpson has been numbered among the sick the past week, but is improving.

The whole Sarratt family are reported as being down sick.

There is a new case of small pox at the S. Hill home.

Has any one seen a census enumerator out our way?

Ten Davis News

There was no Sunday school and church Sunday on account of the sickness on the neighborhood.

George McNicol who has been quite ill with the influenza was well enough to go to Eagle Sunday.

The influenza seems to be about the same in Ten Davis. Mrs. Evans is the only one who is quite sick now. The Iverson family have it, Little Nova Dunn also has it. All the other victims seem to be improved.

School started Monday morning after a weeks vacation on account of the influenza. Several of the children were not able to come back. Miss Miller has the influenza and will not be able to teach this week. Miss Veda Jones from the college is substituting for her.

Mr. Waterman is staying at the F. C. Hertig home this week. La Verne and Winston Miller are not fully over the influenza yet and the Dr. thought it wouldn’t be safe for the teacher to stay there for a week.

Arena Valley

The influenza situation is quite serious here. Almost two-thirds of the families in the valley have had one or more members ill. No pneumonia has developed and it is hoped the epidemic will soon be on the decline. This last week of foggy weather has been very conducive to the influenza.

A number of friends surprised Mr. and Mrs. Blayney Saturday evening at their new home. Owing to so much illness, many were unable to go who wished to do so. A most enjoyable evening was spent by all present.

The literary met Friday evening and the largest crowd of the season enjoyed the program including the debate. The next meeting will be one week from Friday night February 13, if the influenza has flown by then.

Rev. Welch did not preach here Sunday and there was no Sunday school for the first Sunday in more than a year.

(ibid, page 11)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Meridian Times., February 06, 1920, Page 1

19200206MT1

19200206MT2
How To Keep The Flu At A Distance

Copies of a bulletin on “Influenza” are being distributed by the government health bureau. How to guard against influenza? The bulletin says:

“In guarding against disease of all kinds it is important that the body be kept strong and hale to fight off disease germs. This can be done by having a proper proportion of work, play and rest, by keeping the body well clothed, and by eating sufficient, wholesome and properly selected food in connection with diet it is well to remember that milk is one of the best all-around foods obtainable for adults as well as children.

So far as a disease like influenza is concerned health authorities everywhere recognize the close relation between its spread and overcrowded homes. While it is not always possible, especially in times like the present, to avoid such overcrowding, people should consider the health danger and make every effort to reduce the home overcrowding to a minimum. The value of fresh air through open windows can not be over emphasized.

“Where crowding is unavoidable, as in street cars, care should be taken to keep the face so turned as not to inhale directly the air breathed out by another person.

“It is especially important to beware of the person who coughs or sneezes without covering his mouth and nose. It also follows that one should keep out of crowds and stuffy places as much as possible, keep homes, offices, and workshops well aired, spend some time out of doors, each day, walk to work if at all practicable – in short make every possible effort to breathe as much pure air as possible.”

What can you do when you get the flu?

“It is very important that every person who becomes sick with influenza should go home at once and go to bed. This will keep away dangerous complications and will, at the same time keep the person from scattering the disease far and wide. It is highly desirable that no one be permitted to sleep in the same room with the patient. In fact, no one but the nurses should be allowed in the room.”

When death occurs it is usually the result of a complication.

The bulletin states that the highest medical authorities agree that a person who has once had influenza may contract the disease again.
— —

Death Tuesday Of Mrs. John Voorhees

The community was shocked Tuesday morning when they learned that at 4 o’clock Mrs. John Voorhees had passed away. Mrs. Voorhees was a victim of influenza, but it was hoped she would recover. Pneumonia set in and no power on earth could save her. Helen Edith Dunkin was born in Putnam county, Missouri, Jan. 31, 1886. She came to Idaho with her parents in 1904. In 1905 she was united in marriage to John Voorhees, and to this union was born seven children, six living. Her father, one sister, one brother, beside the husband and children already mentioned and a host of friends to mourn her going. She was a mother and helpmeet [sic] in every sense that term implies. The sympathy of the entire community is extended to the bereaved.

Funeral services took place from the M. E. church Wednesday afternoon at 2:30, Rev. C. A. Quinn conducting it. The remains were buried in the local cemetery.
— —

The Meridian Grade Scholars Can Spell!

Despite the prevailing sickness there was a spelling match at the Meridian high school last Friday evening, at which the third, fourth and fifth grades from the grade building participated. …

source: The Meridian Times. (Meridian, Idaho), 06 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Meridian Times., February 06, 1920, Page 8

Meridian News Notes

Joe Daly is reported ill with pneumonia.

Frank Baldwin has returned from a Boise hospital.

C. F. Arzt was among those on the sick list this week.

Guy Remington is quite ill at a hospital. Report yesterday said he was much improved.

Floyd Adams, grandson of Mrs. Hannah Turner, is very ill with pneumonia.

Wm. Florence of the Shorthorn farm is in the hospital with the influenza.

The ground hog did not see his shadow in Meridian Monday.

(ibid, page 8)
————

Further Reading

1919 Idaho Capitol

1919IdahoStateCapitol-a
By Internet Archive Book Images – Image from page 381 of “What to see in America”; (1919), No restrictions, Wikimedia Commons

Construction of the first portion of the capitol building began in the summer of 1905, fifteen years after statehood, and the architects were John E. Tourtellotte and Charles Hummel. Tourtellotte was a Connecticut native whose career began in Massachusetts and continued when he moved to Boise. Hummel was a German immigrant who partnered with Tourtellotte in 1901. The final cost of the building was just over $2 million; it was completed in 1920. The architects used varied materials to construct the building and their design was inspired by Classical examples. Its sandstone exterior is from the state-owned quarry at nearby Table Rock.

continued: Wikipedia
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Idaho Capitol History

In 1905, the Idaho legislature passed the bill authorizing construction of the Capitol Building.

The architects of the Capitol Building were J.E. Tourtellotte and Charles Hummel.

The dome and central parts of the Capitol were built first—from 1905-1912.

The wings (House and Senate chambers) were constructed during 1919 and 1920.

Most of the superstructure is made of sandstone taken from Table Rock (near Boise).

Convicts from the old Idaho Penitentiary were responsible for transporting the 10-ton sandstone blocks from the quarry.

more info: Idaho Department of Administration Capitol Commission
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Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 1)
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Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 38)
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Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 40)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 41)
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Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 43)
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Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 48)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 49)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 50)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 51)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 52)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 53)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 54)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 55)
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Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 57)
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Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 61)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 62)
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Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 67)
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Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 70)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 71)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 72)

Idaho History Sept 19, 2021

Idaho 1918-1920 Influenza Pandemic

Part 72

Idaho Newspaper Clippings February 5, 1920

Idaho photos courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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February 5

The Filer Record., February 05, 1920, Page 1

19200205FR1

19200205FR2
Many Cases of Flu Reported In Filer
110 Pupils Absent From Grade School Today

With twelve homes in the community quarantined for influenza, [and] at least two quarantined for small pox the local health situation has become a matter of no small concern.

At the Rural high school a nurse has been employed to examine daily the students, and all pupils found to be ill are cared for and sent to their homes.

Doctors state that while the influenza this season does not appear to be a virulent as in the past, still there should be no lessening of precautionary measures.

The small pox cases in town are few and it is said little fear of its spread is anticipated. However it has been found necessary to close the schools of Hansen on account of the disease.

Over 150 cases of influenza have been reported in the county and every effort is being made to control the spread of the disease. At Twin Falls it is said that a large number of school teachers and pupils are out of school with the “flu.”

A total of 2,488 cases of influenza deaths and 15 pneumonia deaths have been reported to the office of the State Board of Health for the week ending January 31st.

The hopeful note in the situation is to be found in the fact that many of the communities have been able to bring the situation under control. The reports received toward the end of the week having diminished very materially. The virulence of the infection seems to be gradually increasing, the influenza and pneumonia deaths showing a marked increase over the previous week.
— —

The Groundhog Saw His Shadow Monday

Monday was “groundhog day,” and to those who are superstitious, six more weeks of winter are promised. A warming and not unwelcome sun enabled Mr. and Mrs. Groundhog to view their shadows most all day. According to tradition, they once more took up their abode in the ground and shall remain there, waiting the passing of six more weeks of winter. It is fortunate that seasons are not governed by tradition and superstition and that notwithstanding almanacs and weather prognosticators, weather continues to be governed by forces more powerful than signs and “old sayings.”

source: The Filer Record. (Filer, Idaho), 05 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Payette Enterprise., February 05, 1920, Page 1

19200205PE1

Personals And Local Mention

Mr. A. E. Wood who has been confined to his home suffering from an attack of lung fever,* is now able to be at his office.

Ed. Shellworth, head plumber at Lauer Brothers, was away from business this week on account of his family being down with the flu.

Miss Marjorie White who was taken to a Boise hospital suffering from the effects of the flu, is some better but it is feared she will lose the sight of her right eye.

The many friends of Mrs. M. F. Albert will be pleased to learn that she is now slightly improving. Her condition for some time has been quite critical, but unless further complications arise it is believed she will soon recover.

Mr. Smith of this office received a letter this week from his sister at Sioux City, Iowa, stating that diphtheria is quite bad at Sioux City. His sister’s children are down with the disease. The letter contained strong odor of disinfectant. While here in Payette quite a few are down with lagrippe or flu we may be thankful that diphtheria is not among us.

* Lung fever = pneumonia
— —

Clarence Wallace Farlow

Clarence Wallace Farlow died Tuesday evening at the home of his sister, Mrs. Anson Hoyt here in Payette following a relapse of the flu which developed into pneumonia. The body was shipped Wednesday to Norcaster, Kansas, for burial. He was first taken with the flu, complicated with bronchial pneumonia about a month ago. He recovered and was able to be up and assist in the care of his sister and family who were all down with influenza, which may have caused the relapse which resulted in his death. Clarence was a bright young man 20 years of age, and is survived by a father, G. W. Farlow of Lennox, Idaho, who was here and accompanied the body, and a sister, Mrs. Anson Hoyt of Payette.

source: Payette Enterprise. (Payette, Canyon Co., Idaho), 05 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Emmett Index. February 05, 1920, Page 1

19200205EI1

19200205EI2
Red Cross Emergency Hospital
Beds and Nurses Provided in Masonic Temple to Care For Unfortunates

The prevalence of influenza and pneumonia and the scarcity of nurses induced the Red Cross chapter to open an emergency hospital for the care of patients who are unable to secure proper care and attention. The Masonic lodge tendered the use of rooms in its temple for the purpose and on Saturday three beds were installed and Mrs. Turner, a professional nurse from Coeur d’Alene was secured to take charge. So far only one patient has availed himself of the privileges – a Spaniard who is suffering from influenza. Three beds have been set up. Others will be added as necessity requires.

The services will be free to those who are unable to pay for it. To those who are able to pay a small fee will be charged. Patients may bring their own bedding, and are requested to do so if possible.

In providing the community with this assistance and service in combating disease, the Red Cross chapter is living up to its record of unselfish devotion to humanity. The members are giving freely of their time and funds to alleviate suffering and distress, and seek to extend their helpfulness to all who need their services by the institution of this emergency hospital.
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Groundhog Befuzzled

Monday was Groundhog Day, and there was such a variety of weather in this part of Idaho that His Porkship doesn’t know whether to go bury himself in his hole for six more weeks or to stay out and take chances of Old Man Flu getting him. Here in the valley there was not even a glimpse of the sun to be had all day, while on Freezeout hill, and from the top of Pickett Corral hill to McCall, Old Sol beamed with full refulgence. If the old Missouri legend still holds good, there will be six weeks more of winter weather on the butte and in the country north and east of Emmett, but here in the Emmett valley “Springtime Has Come, Gentle Annie” right now and will stay. So what’s a poor groundhop [sic] to do, anyway!

source: The Emmett Index. (Emmett, Idaho), 05 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Emmett Index. February 05, 1920, Page 4

Emmett News

The Bank of Emmett force is back at work again after a tussle with the flu.

Frank S. Moore, of the forest office, is convalescent from an attack of the grip.

A. O. Sutton, who has been confined to his home for a week, is on the road to recovery.

Frank Wallis is recovering from a severe attack of flu, but his wife and young son are seriously ill and grave concern is felt as to their recovery.

A. P. Peterson, who has been quite ill with the flu, is improving.

G. W. Maxfield, who has been confined at home a week with a threatened attack of pneumonia, is on the mend. Superintendent Goodwin and Mrs. Goodwin have both been quite ill, but they, too, are improving. A more settled condition of weather will be a big aid to convalescents – it be soon.

Word was received here recently of the death from influenza of Blasius Shaull at the home of his brother-in-law, Conrad Pope, near Nampa.

Considerable complaint is being made of the practice of throwing ashes in the alleys. Those who do so are violating the city’s ordinance and officials expect to take action against offenders if the practice is not stopped.
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Letha

Mr. Robinson of Cedar Edge, Colo., arrived Wednesday of last week for a visit with his sister, Mrs. D. F. Bott and family. While he wanted to stay and look over the country, he was anxious to get home because of the flu epidemic and left today (Wednesday.)

Allan Newell was ill last week, but is in the store this week. He believes he didn’t have the flu, but is taking care of himself nevertheless. He has news that both Mr. and Mrs. Stegner are ill at Fruitland and one of the children and would like to go down, but believes it not wise.

Dr. Polly has been down several times the past week treating Mrs. Pomeroy, Mr. Henderson and R. L. Battan.

Among those who have come down with the prevailing epidemic since last news day are: R. L. Battan, Glenn Kiser and Mrs. Butler, and also the Lew Gordon and Whitely families.

Mr. Munson is doing chores for Glenn Kiser this week.

Mrs. Pomeroy, who has been appointed a member of the executive board of the Red Cross to represent Letha and vicinity, this week had a letter from headquarters at Emmett telling of the establishment of an emergency hospital for flu in the Masonic rooms at Emmett. The Red Cross are prepared to care for those who have no one to look after them. A small amount will be accepted from those wishing to pay, otherwise it will be done free of cost.

Dan Hanson, Irb DeMasters, C. L. Henderson and Bismark Youtaler are out after a tussle with the flu, but they are not looking for work – not yet.

(ibid, page 4)
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The Emmett Index. February 05, 1920, Page 8

News Of Gem County
By The Index’s Correspondents

South Slope

The young son of Louis Obermeyer is ill this week, threatened with a bad cold.

Haw Creek

(Too late for last Week)

The Jay Sanders family, who have been quite sick with flu, are now recovering.

The J. Loe Reed family are on the sick list this week with the flu.

Owing to sickness and bad roads, there will be no meeting of the U. A. Club. The next meeting will be February 12th with Mrs. Ed Francis. It will also be election of officers, so every one come.

Central Mesa

(Too late for last Week)

The Frank Nicks family are having a siege of the flu.The Brogan family have had their turn with the flu.

Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Hereth and baby are nicely recovering from the flu.

Edgar Brogan has the influenza.

The Sherwood family are having their turn with the flu.

Mary Heath has the flu.

Elwood Schoening has the chicken pox.

Quite a number of children are absent from school this week on account of sickness. Miss Johnson has the flu and Mr. Teerink is teaching in her place.

Hanna

(Too late for last Week)

Louise Blaser has been quite sick the past week, being confined to her bed for several days.

The Spoor family, who have been quarantined for influenza, are all recovering nicely.

The ice jam in the river, with its consequent flooding of fields and washing out of bridges, has made the road to Letha impassable, and it is causing much inconvenience to our farmers, who use Letha as a shipping point.

Bramwell

The Mart Smith family have all recovered from their recent sickness and are ready to fumigate as soon as the weather will permit.

This is seven days of dark, foggy weather. We can not remember a time when such has occurred in the last ten years in Idaho. Give us a day of sunshine.

Dr. Reynolds had the misfortune to upset his car while driving in the fog Monday evening. He had crossed the sleigh bridge near the Vanderdasson schoolhouse and as he neared the first culvert beyond, someway in making the turn, the car went over into the ditch. Luckily the car was not damaged to any extent and the doctor was able to proceed on his way.

Bissell Creek

Mr. and Mrs. Warner Head and Thelma have been confined to their bed with influenza.

(ibid, page 8)
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Fielding Academy, Paris, Idaho (1)

ParisFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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The Grangeville Globe. February 05, 1920, Page 1

19190205GG1

19190205GG2
Grim Reaper Leaves Dark Trail; Many Deaths Are Recorded
Dreaded Influenza, While Apparently on Wane, Taking Heavy Toll; Few New Cases Reported; None Desperate.

The outbreak of influenza that has been sweeping over the country for the past few weeks seems to have about reached the maximum and many people are of the opinion that the dreaded disease is now dying down, the precautions that have been taken by the different communities no doubt having a great deal to do with the rapid check of the epidemic.

While there are a great many individual cases in the community all seem to be doing well, a shortage of nurses being the greatest drawback in fighting the disease. A large number of the Red Cross ladies who had experience in the work last year are rendering valuable aid to the patients and likewise to the physicians who are on the go day and night.

The toll taken since our last issue seems unusually heavy, four deaths having been recorded, a pall of gloom has been cast over the entire community.

Mrs. Roy Nail

Mrs. Addie Alice Nail, aged 32 years 8 months and 12 days, wife of our esteemed townsman, Roy Nail, died last Saturday and was laid to rest in Prairie View cemetery at 10 a.m. on Monday, February 2, all that was mortal being followed to the grave by a large number of admiring friends. Funeral services were conducted by Rev. H. S. Randall, of the Federated church, A. J. Maugg directing.

Deceased leaves to mourn her sudden taking away the bereaved husband and young son, Cornelius, her parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Mitchell, and one sister Mrs. Will Huff, all residing in this community.

Addie Alice Mitchell was born in Melrose, Montana, and in 1903 came with her parents to Idaho county and settled near Stites. Three years later on July 2, 1906, she was united in marriage to Roy E. Nail at Stites. For the past five years the family home has been at Grangeville.

Mrs. George Manning

Mrs. George W. Manning, aged 37 years, died at the family residence in this city last Sunday morning after suffering for ten days with an attack of influenza. Funeral services were held in the open air at the home Tuesday morning and interment was made at Prairie View cemetery, Rev. H. S. Randall officiating, and A. J. Maugg directing.

The deceased lady is survived by her husband, George W. Manning, who for the past number of years has been connected with the Inland Abstract company, and three daughters, Pauline, aged 15, Zelma, 2, and Verna, 4 years of age.

Ethel Manning was born November 25, 1882, near Southwest City, Missouri, where she grew to womanhood and where on September 10, 1903, she was united in marriage to George W. Manning of the same place, they having been schoolmates. Immediately afterward they removed to this place where they have since made their home. From early girlhood she had been a member of the Church of Christ always a persistent and tireless worker. When she passed away she was superintendent of the Cradle Roll and teacher of the ladies’ Bible class of the Christian church.

John Grant Howard

A sufferer for a number of years from acute stomach trouble John Grant Howard passed out from this life Monday forenoon, February 2nd, the end being hastened by an attack of the influenza from which pneumonia resulted. Funeral services were conducted at the graveside at 11 o’clock this forenoon (Thursday) by Rev. H. S. Randall of the Federated church and were attended by many friends of the family, the funeral being directed by Undertaker A. J. Maugg.

Deceased is survived by the widow and eight children as follows: Dennis, Leonard, Otis, Gladys, Beulah, Zuwa, Velda and Mary, three brothers and seven sisters also survive.

John Grant Howard was born January 13, 1872, in Stone county, Missouri, where he grew to manhood. He was united in marriage with Miss Minnie Bass, on February 24, 1895. The family removed to this country in 1901, since which time they have been engaged in farming.

George David Stanbery

Geo. D. Stanbery, one of the best known farmers and stockmen of the Winona section, passed away at the family home in this city early Tuesday morning after a short illness from pneumonia which resulted from an attack of influenza, at the age of 49 years.

The deceased is survived by his widow and eight children, four boys and four girls, as follows, Mabel, Elsie, Roy, Martin, Stanley, Ernest, Velda and Minnie. With the exception of Mabel and Elsie, the children were all at home at the time of death. The former is married, and we are informed resides in the Winona district, and Miss Elsie who is attending university at Berkeley, California, is expected to reach home on Friday night’s train.

Funeral services will be held at Mount Zion church, Winona, Saturday afternoon, and interment will be under auspices of Lowe lodge I. O. O. F. of that place of which he was a member. Undertaker E. S. Hancock will direct the funeral.

Mr. Stanbery was one of the big farmers of the Winona country up to last year when he disposed of the greater part of his land interests in that section and moved to Grangeville. Later on he purchased a tract of land near the foothills and spent his time between that place and his town home which he purchased in order to give his family the benefit of our school system. He was born in Stoddard county, Missouri, January 20, 1871. On January 2, 1896, in the same county he was united in marriage to Miss Cornelia Mitchell, and came west to the state of Washington. In October, 1898, the family settled in the Winona country where they have since followed farming and stockraising.

Mrs. Henry Kurthuis

Mrs. Henry Kurthuis, aged 35 years, died at the family home two miles north from Grangeville, Wednesday morning from pneumonia, and is survived by her husband, four sons, Bart, John, Jake and Neil; two sisters, Mrs. A. Doornbas and Mrs. H. Sholteus, Grangeville; also two brothers, M. Vanderwall, Grangeville and John Vanderwall of Conrad Montana.

Deceased was a native of Holland and had resided in the United States for 14 years, coming with her husband from Montana about six years ago.

Funeral services will be held at the home at 11 o’clock Saturday and interment at Prairie View cemetery. It is expected a minister from Sunnyside, Wash., will officiate, with A. J. Maugg in charge of the funeral.

Mrs. Thomas Seay

The remains of Mrs. Thomas Seay, who passed away at the family home at Clarkston Tuesday will reach this city on the evening train and will be laid to rest in Prairie View cemetery Friday, the hour not being set at the time of going to press.

Mrs. and Mrs. Thomas Seay removed to Clarkston from Winona last fall to spend the winter and place their son in school. With the outbreak of influenza the entire family was afflicted. Deceased also leaves a child a few days old.

Reily Seay went down to Clarkston on Wednesdays train to aid the family of his brother in their distress and will accompany the remains to this city.
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19190205GG3John Hadorn Is Called
Whitebird Resident, Native of County, Victim of Influenza

After suffering about a week from an attack of influenza which was followed by pneumonia, John Milton Hadorn, aged 33 years, one month and eight days, succumbed to the ravages of the disease, leaving to mourn his untimely departure the widow, two step-children, his mother, Mrs. T. B. Hadorn, one brother and three half-sisters.

Deceased was born at Deer Creek, in Idaho county. After reaching manhood he followed farming and stock raising, but of late had been running a saw mill. About a month ago he sold his ranch and saw mill interests.

Funeral Services, conducted by Rev. Gamble of the local church were held at the cemetery at Whitebird at 2 o’clock p.m. Monday. Undertaker E. S. Hancock had charge of the funeral.

source: The Grangeville Globe. (Grangeville, Idaho), 05 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Grangeville Globe. February 05, 1920, Page 8

Local Happenings

Fred Miller, is back again at his harness shop, after a week’s suffering with the influenza.

Attorney A. S. Hardy has been confined to his home for the past week with the prevalent disease. At this writing he is much improved and will soon be at his office again.

Jack Hartnett, Pacific telephone trouble shooter at this point, has been released from the Alcorn hospital, where he spent a week suffering from the influenza.

Robert Reilly, formerly telephone man for the Pacific phone company at this place and erstwhile deputy sheriff of Idaho county, came up from Lewiston early this week to look after the company’s work at this point during the illness of Jack Hartnett who has been confined in the Alcorn hospital with the “flu.”

Clarence Nixon is able to be about again after an illness extending over several weeks.

Lance McCready, who has been ill for a week or more, is able to be around again. He has not returned to work in the Day & Abramson barber shop, however.

Geo. M. Robertson, cashier of the First National bank of Cottonwood, was in the city Monday, assisting in arranging for the funeral of his niece, Mrs. Geo. W. Manning, which occurred on Tuesday morning.

Lee Miller was down town for the first time this forenoon for quite a spell. Mr. Miller is well advanced in years and is not as strong on his pins as formerly. He stated he was feeling fairly good, had a good appetite and thus far has escaped “flu.”
— —

Short Handed at P. O.

The postoffice crew is seriously crippled this week with the illness of Acting Postmaster J. A. Peterson and Clerk Frank Reynolds. A. M. Ecker has the morning shift, working from 3:30 to 1 o’clock p.m. and W. T. Williams and Charles Simmons now handle the evening mail alone. It requires a little longer, perhaps, but under the circumstances, all patrons of the office should be very considerate.
— —

Judge Scales Sets Term

Judge Wallace N. Scales this week set the time for holding the adjourned term of district court for Lewis county for March 22nd. The term was slated for February 2nd but on account of the prevalent influenza it was deemed best on conferring with the officers at Nezperce to have the date postponed.
— —

19190205GG4Delay On court Building
Influenza Causing Setback in Completion of Repairs Under Way

Work has been progressing nicely on the remodeling of the old school building which is to be used for a court house to house all the county officials, but the visitation of the influenza. Doc Jesse and Elmer Kennedy were making fine headway with the work until stricken with the disease early last week. Several of the partitions had been removed and new ones placed where needed. Plastering was also going on at the same time.

The new vault constructed by Chester Arnold has been completed and is a very substantial and strong box. So strong, indeed, that Mr. Arnold states that it could not be blown out with dynamite.

When finished, this structure will afford ample room for all the county officers, in fact there will be rooms for every needed purpose about a court house.
— —

Federated Church

No services next Sunday but we hope to be able to resume on the 15th. Persons desiring to get the Sunday school papers may do so by calling at Mrs. Harry Morris’ Residence.

H. S. Randall, Pastor.

(ibid, page 8)
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Idaho County Free Press. February 05, 1920, Page 1

19200205ICFP1

19200205ICFP2

5 Are Dead From Influenza Here In 5 Days; Epidemic Now Is Abating
Few New Cases in Grangeville, but in the Country Many Are Ill with Disease
Doctors Busy Day and Night Ministering to Sick; Shortage of Nurses Keenly Felt

19200205ICFP3

Five deaths from Spanish influenza in Grangeville or vicinity in five successive days is the toll of the disease locally during the last week.

The contagion late last week spread with alarming rapidity over the city and adjoining farming districts. It spread to Cottonwood and to Whitebird, where one death, that of John Haydorn was reported.

The epidemic has reached its crest in Grangeville, according to physicians who have been busy day and night answering hundreds of calls. Fewer new cases were reported in the city during the last few days, and many families have been released from quarantine. In the country districts, however, the disease is spreading, physicians declare. It was much later in breaking out in the rural communities than in town.

Scarcity of nurses to care for influenza patients has resulted in difficulty being experienced in many families, where several members were ill with the malady. Persons who were convalescent having been obliged to leave their beds in order to care for other members of the family who were ill, and thereby have suffered relapses.

Dr. B. Chipman, city health officer who was attending a large number of patients, has been ill for several days, and his work has been taken over by other physicians of the city who already were busy almost twenty-four hours in the day.

Mrs. Addie Alice Nail

The first victim of the present influenza epidemic in Grangeville was Mrs. Addie Alice Nail, wife of Roy E. Nail. Mrs. Nail died Saturday morning in her home, after an illness of but a few days. …

Mrs. Ethel Manning

Influenza claimed another victim at 7:15 Sunday morning when Mrs. Ethel Manning, wife of George W. Manning, died in her home in this city, after an illness of ten days’ duration. She was 37 years old. …

John Grant Howard

John Grant Howard, 48 years old, a well known Camas Prairie rancher, died of influenza-pneumonia, Monday morning in the Alcorn hospital, in Grangeville. Mr. Howard was stricken a week before he died. …

George David Stanbery

George David Stanbery is dead. Big hearted, jovial Dave Stanbery is no more. He has fallen victim to influenza. Death came to him at 2 Tuesday morning in his home in this city, after a brief illness of influenza-pneumonia. …

Mrs. Trientje Kurthuis

Mrs. Trientje Kurthuis, wife of Henry Kurthuis, died early Wednesday morning in her home, two miles north of Grangeville. Death was caused by pneumonia, following influenza. … 35 years old …
— —

John M. Haydorn Of Whitebird Is Dead

John Milston Haydorn, 33 years old, died late Saturday night in his home in Whitebird, of influenza-pneumonia. Mr. Haydorn, who was well-known throughout the Salmon river country, where he had spent his entire life, contracted influenza two weeks before his death. Though a robust man, the disease was aggravated by exposure when Mr. Haydorn walked two miles from his ranch to his home in Whitebird. …
— —

19200205ICFP4Epidemic On Down Grade At Whitebird

The influenza Epidemic at Whitebird is greatly improved, according to advices received by the Free Press from Whitebird at noon, Thursday. A number of serious cases existed early in the week, but in all the crisis has passed. Only one death, that of John Haydorn, occurred at Whitebird.
— —

Mrs. T. H. Seay Dies In Clarkston; Pneumonia

Mrs. T. H. Seay of Winona died Tuesday of pneumonia in Clarkston, where she was spending the winter. The body was brought to Grangeville Thursday evening, and taken to the Maugg parlors. The funeral will be held, probably Friday, with burial in Prairie View cemetery.
— —

Mrs. W. H. Hill, Nee Ina Adams, Is Dead

Word has just been received in Grangeville of the death recently in Seattle of Mrs. W. H. Hill, formerly Miss Ina Adams, who several years ago resided in Grangeville, and was well known here. Death resulted from pneumonia.

source: Idaho County Free Press. (Grangeville, Idaho), 05 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Idaho County Free Press. February 05, 1920, Page 2

Fenn

(From Last Week)

Lloyd Spencer was taken ill a few days ago with influenza. It is the only case reported in this vicinity so far.

Lucile

(From Last Week)

Carl Kennedy is here taking the census for this district.

Whitebird

(Special Correspondence)

Dr. W. A. Foskett has ordered the public school in this district closed because of seriousness of the influenza epidemic.

Mrs. Crooks, while caring for her son and family, who are bedfast with influenza, on their farm near here, was attacked by frequent fainting spells while doing chores. Dr. Foskett attended and pronounced her illness heart trouble.

Following is a list of persons recovering from influenza: Tom Galloway, Mr. and Mrs. Marion Tipton and son, Dale, Mr. and Mrs. Roy Irwin, the Gill and Jilson families.

Doumecq

(From Last Week)

Considerable illness is reported on the hill this week. Mr. and Mrs. McSpadden and son have been confined to their home for several days. Mr. Allison Vaughn is unable to be out. Mary Morgan is not in school on account of illness.

Doumecq farmers are being visited this week by the census enumerator, Charles Sallee.

Roads from Canfield to Boles are almost impassible on account of ice. The road is almost a solid pack of ice and very slanting in places.

(ibid, page 2)
— — — —

Idaho County Free Press. February 05, 1920, Page 6

Local News In Brief

Federated Church — No services next Sunday, but we hope to be able to resume on the 15th. Persons desiring to get the Sunday school papers may do so by calling at Mrs. Harry Morris’ home. H. S. Randall, pastor.

Court Postponed — Judge Scales announces that opening of district court in Lewis county has been postponed until March 22, owing to the influenza epidemic.

Dr. Chipman Ill — Dr. B. Chipman was confined to his home the first of the week, suffering from an abscess in the nose.
— —

Personal

George M. Robertson, Cottonwood banker, was called to Grangeville Sunday evening, owing to the death of his niece, Mrs. George Manning.

Mrs. A. J. Maugg was called to Cottonwood last Saturday to care for Mr. Maugg’s mother, Mrs. John Maugg, and sister, Miss Agnes Maugg, who were suffering from influenza.

Robert Riley, telephone lineman, formerly of Grangeville, is here from Lewiston on telephone work, to take the place of Jack Hartnett, who has been ill with influenza.

Miss Elsie Stanbery is expected to arrive in Grangeville Friday evening from Berkeley, Cal., where she is a student at the University of California. She was called home owning to the death of her father, G. D. Stanbery.

Miss Leasel Hussman and Miss Beatrice Calhoun, telephone operators, of Cottonwood, were in Grangeville this week, employed on the local Pacific States switchboard, in the absence of Misses O’Kelley, regular operators, who are ill with influenza.
— —

Notice

Dr. B. Chipman, announces that he will be able to answer calls in both city and country on and after next Saturday.

(ibid, page 6)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., February 05, 1920, Page 1

19200205DSM1

19200205DSM2
Report Influenza Conditions Better
Only Six New Influenza Cases Reported Wednesday – No New Flags Up

No new quarantine flags were put out Wednesday and but six new cases were reported, these being in homes where the disease had already appeared. This is far below the smallest number of new cases reported in one day since the epidemic struck Moscow and is regarded as very encouraging. Despite the fact that there was one death, that of the five-year-old child of James Greer, conditions are regarded today as better than at any time since the epidemic appeared here.

While no record of the number of patients release from quarantine are available it is understood that many times as many were released as the number of new cases reported, and many quarantine flags have been taken down and whole families released from quarantine.

Weather conditions are regarded as unfavorable, the cold, damp, foggy weather being especially adapted to spreading the influenza, but in spite of that there has been a rapid and marked decrease in the number of cases and also in the severity of the cases reported. Taken as a whole Wednesday was regarded as by far the most favorable day in Moscow since the first cases of influenza were discovered here.

Much Better at Lewiston

Lewiston, Idaho — The reports on the influenza situation in Lewiston were again encouraging yesterday, with very few new cases reported and the condition of patients generally improving. The reports of the physicians show there are several very severe cases remaining in the city and the appeal is again made for all citizens to continue all precautions and safeguards.

The reports received yesterday by Dr. J. N. Alley, county health officer, show there are 400 cases in the county outside of Lewiston that are being cared for by licensed physicians, practically every community is affected as cases are reported from Gifford, Lenore, Lapwai, Leland and Spalding. The government tuberculosis sanatorium at Lapwai has 72 cases and there have been several deaths there. It is reported there are a number of very serious cases remaining at the sanitarium.

The reports from prairie points show the entire upper country is stricken. One death was reported last night from Keuterville, and it has become necessary to close the schools at Cottonwood because of the “flu” conditions there. Motion picture theatres and all other public gathers [sic] have been placed under the ban.

Mrs. Englis is Dead

Mrs. Maude Englis, wife of Charles P. Englis of 626 Ninth avenue, died at White’s hospital Tuesday at 12:45 o’clock, noon, death ensuing from pneumonia following an attack of influenza contracted two weeks before. While suffering from influenza Mrs. Englis gave birth to a baby girls one week ago last Sunday, and her weakened condition made her very susceptible to the ravages of the disease resulting in her death.

Nezperce Farmer Dead

Nezperce — Fred Maher, a farmer residing eight miles northeast of Nezperce, died this morning from influenza-pneumonia. He was about 35 years of age and had resided in the prairie country since a child. He is survived by a wife, two daughters, his parents and a sister. His wife and sister are both ill with the disease, but were reported doing nicely this evening.

The general conditions in the Nezperce section are improved and the reports show only a few serious cases remaining. It is believed the schools can be reopened next week in the event the conditions continue to improve.

Death at Keuterville

Cottonwood — Mrs. Charles Mader of Keuterville died at the family home this morning from pneumonia, following influenza. All of the members of the family were stricken and it has been necessary for neighbors to care for them. Mrs. Mader was about 45 years of age and is survived by a husband and four children. The family has resided in the Keuterville section for many years. No funeral arrangement have been made.

Many New Cases at Spokane

Spokane — Three hundred and eight new cases of influenza and one death were reported here today. The total now is 1,561. The cases for the most part are mild and last only a few days.

Spread at Berkeley

Berkeley, Cal. — The Berkeley board of health ordered tonight that all schools, churches, motion picture houses and other places of public gatherings be closed until such time as the decreased number of influenza cases made their reopening advisable. Seven hundred cases have been reported.

Death at Walla Walla

Walla Walla — One death from influenza occurred here today, Harry Lanhart, 10-year-old son of Mrs. and Mrs. George Lanhart, passing away. He became ill at 3 p.m. and died at 7 o’clock.

Another Death at Grangeville

Grangeville — The death of Mrs. Henry Courthouse occurred at an early hour this morning from influenza-pneumonia. Mrs. Courthouse was about 45 years of age and was stricken several days ago. She is survived by her husband. The funeral will be conducted Saturday.

The general situation in Grangeville is improving but there are a number of critical cases remaining. City Health Officer Dr. Chipman has been confined to his home with the disease for the past several days and has turned over the handling of the situation to the other physicians. The reports show that few new cases have developed this week.
— —

19200205DSM3Another Death From Influenza
Small Child Victim – Family Has Had Twelve Members Down With The Flu

Johnny L. Greear, aged five years last August, died last night making the third death in Moscow from influenza. The case is a peculiarly sad one. Both parents are very sick with the disease and will not be able to attend the funeral of their child. It is reported that 12 members of the family have had the disease.

The child is a son of Mrs. and Mrs. James Greear, living in the south-easten part of town. He has been sick for three weeks. The entire family has been sick and the grand-parents, Mr. and Mrs. David Greear, of Troy, came to assist in caring for the sick and they were also taken down with the disease.

A sister, Mrs. Fred Gray, went to help and she and her children have had the disease. Several of these are still quite ill and both Mr. and Mrs. Greear are very sick, their condition causing much alarm.

Neighbors have been very kind in assisting to care for the sick folks and are doing all in their power to relieve the suffering and see that the sick lack nothing essential to their comfort or welfare.

The funeral will be held at 10 o’clock tomorrow forenoon. There will be brief services at the cemetery, only.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 05 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., February 05, 1920, Page 2

School May Open Monday

The present indications are that Moscow schools will open Monday. The board is not prepared to state definitely today that the schools will be opened, but unless conditions grow worse it is stated the schools will be opened Monday morning and a full attendance is desired in all rooms.
— —

Remember “Central”

Moscow people, who responded so readily to the appeal made last week to use their telephones as little as possible during the influenza epidemic, seem to have forgotten the plea of the operators, or to have reached the conclusion that the central office is not short of help now.

Business has been almost up to normal in the past two days despite the fact that just half of the operators are still away from their desks. Some of them have been very sick and have not recovered from the flu. It may be several days before they are back at their desks and in the mean time the public is urged to use the telephone just as little as possible.

“We ought to get a better service with the increase in rates,” said a Moscow citizen. But he forgot that the telephone operators are not responsible for the increased rates and that they are human. At times there are so many calls in at one time that all cannot be given prompt attention and impatient patrons frequently show their temper and “scold” the girls. The girls do not “talk back” but their feelings are hurt and when they are working overtime and under a nervous, physical and mental strain, it takes very little unkindness to bring tears to their eyes. If people would only realize this they would be more patient and they could make the work of the operators very much easier at this trying time by the exercise of a little more patience and by not using the telephone except when absolutely necessary.
— —

No American Legion Meeting

Owning to the influenza situation the regular meeting of the American Legion will not be held tonight, but an executive meeting will be held at the Moscow hotel at 7:30. There will be no dance Friday night. The Legion is for upholding the officers in all things and was the first to call off its dance in Moscow. Dr. Leitch, city health officer, said: “I want to thank and commend the American Legion and Commander Monahan for the splendid way in which they have cooperated with the authorities in the flu situation.”

(ibid, page 2)
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., February 05, 1920, Page 4

W. O. Sholes returned home today from a two weeks visit to the coast. The Sholes home is now out of quarantine, Maxwell Sholes and Dr. Chislett, having recovered from the influenza.

(ibid, page 4)
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., February 05, 1920, Page 5

City News

Frank Stevens, who has been ill with influenza and pneumonia is now sufficiently recovered to be up around home.

Grace and Hugh Wallace, children of Dean and Mrs. J. G. Eldridge, are recovering nicely from attacks of the influenza.

The family of A. H. Olson has been ill of influenza but is now much improved. Miss Susan Johns assisted in the nursing.

The C. S. Clarke home is released from quarantine. Miss Jones, high school teacher, who rooms there, has recovered from a serious attack of the “flu.”

Mrs. Anna Colby was called home from Palouse to assist in nursing at the J. H. Whorley home south of Moscow, which was formerly Mrs. Shea’s farm. Mr. and Mrs. Whorley and five children are ill with influenza. Mr. Whorley and two of the children are now seriously ill. Mrs. John King is taking care of the three month’s old baby.

Clyde Hunter, who has been very ill of pneumonia, is reported as improved.
— —

Two Basketball Teams Play At Moscow

Willammette and Whitman, both said this year to possess teams of unusual ability, are on the University of Idaho’s menu for next week, an affray with Willammette having been scheduled for Monday night and games with the Whitman Missionaries having been arrange for Wednesday and Thursday.

Idaho’s prospects have been somewhat dimmed by the illness of Ernest K. Lindley, captain and crack guard, who has been an influenza victim and who may be unable to appear in the first contest scheduled. His position will be filled either by Cobb Cozier or Boyde Cornelison, both Moscow high school products. …

(ibid, page 5)
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., February 05, 1920, Page 6

19200205DSM4Speed Of Epidemic Varies
Disease travel According to the Modes of Transportation in the Regions Afflicted.

The speed at which an epidemic – whether it be of influenza or any other infectious disease – spreads depends upon the rapidity of the usual means of transportation. In his presidential address at the congress of American Physicians and Surgeons, Dr. Simon Flexner said:

“In eastern Russia and Turkestan influenza spreads with the pace of a caravan, in Europe and America with the speed of an express train, and in the world at large with the rapidity of an ocean liner; and if one project forward the outcome of the means of intercommunication of the near future we may predict that the next pandemic, should one arise, will extend with the swiftness of the airship. Moreover, not only is this rate of spread determined by the nature of the transportation facilities of the region or the era, but towns and villages, mainland and island, are invaded early or late or preserved entirely from attack according as they lie within or without the avenues of approach or are protected by inaccessibility, as in instances of remote mountain settlement and of islands distant from the ocean lanes or frozen in during winter periods.”

(ibid, page 6)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Nezperce Herald., February 05, 1920, Page 1

19200205NH1

19200205NH2Fred Maher Influenza Victim

Fred Maher died at 7:10 o’clock Tuesday morning at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. James Maher, in the Alpine section northeast of this city. The cause of his death was pneumonia, following influenza. He had been ailing since last December, but did not seem to realize the seriousness of his case until too late.

The funeral was conducted at noon today from the undertaking parlors of the Nezperce Hardware Co. and the remains were interred in the local cemetery. Owing to the nature of the ailment the service was not public.

The deceased was 25 years of age and had grown to manhood with his parents on their homestead farm in the Alpine district.

He was married three years ago last March and two children were born to the union. He is survived by his wife and children, his parents and a sister. The wife and their children and his sister were also ill of the influenza, but have recovered.

His is the first fatality in this community chargeable to the present spread of influenza. The neighbors and friends of this stricken family feel deepest sympathy for them in this sad hour of bereavement.

We take this means of expressing our sincere thanks to our neighbors and friends who so generously assisted us through our recent sad trial.

Mrs. Fred Maher and Mr. and Mrs. Jas Maher
— —

The latest cases of influenza reported in town are, the entire family of Sanford Stapleton, who were stricken yesterday, and Leo Robertson, the druggist, who developed flu symptoms this morning. As we go to press, it appears all cases in town are getting along satisfactorily; that of Lloyd Whiting being the most serious, and his condition shows improvement this afternoon.
— —

19200205NH3Superintendent Moscow Schools Flu Victim

Professor John H. Rich, superintendent of Moscow city schools is dead.

His death occurred at 9 o’clock last Saturday night. He went to a local hospital suffering with influenza just a week before and his case was regarded as serious from the start. Mrs. Rich was also stricken with the disease but recovered and was able to be up and about the hospital when the summons came to her husband.

Professor Rich was serving his sixth year with the Moscow high school. He was principal of the high school three years and was promoted to be city superintendent three years ago last fall and was in the second semester of his third year as superintendent when he was taken ill. His work here was of a remarkably high order. – Star-Mirror
— —

District Court March 22

To further safeguard conditions anent [sic] the influenza situation, Judge W. N. Scales has again ordered the postponement of the Lewis county February term of district court, and has set Monday, March 22, as the date for opening such term.
— —

Teachers’ Conference Postponed

The conference of Lewis county teachers, which was to have been held on February 13, has been indefinitely postponed because of the prevalence of influenza. The new date of this conference will depend upon conditions making the postponement necessary, but it will be as early as practicable.
— —

19200205NH4Home Nursing Care In Influenza

The following instructions, sent broadcast over the lad by the American Red Cross, have, where followed, been a wonderful help in combating the influenza attack in this country. It will pay every family to familiarize itself with them:

Symptoms

1. Fever, chill, sore throat, marked weakness, discharge from the nose, cough, headache, vomiting, disturbance of digestion, shaking of limbs.

Treatment of Patient.

Call doctor.

1. Patient should be put to bed in a room alone, with plenty of fresh air and no draughts.

2. Hot tub bath to induce perspiration before going to bed unless patient is weak.

3. Liquid diet – such as eggnog, cocoa, milk soup, milk, lemonade, weak teach and coffee, broth every two hours.

4. Give water freely – one glass every hour.

5. Give cathartic. One tablespoonful castor oil or one or two tablespoonfuls of epsom salts. If bowels do not move well in twelve hours, give an injection or repeat the cathartic.

6. If fever is high, give as much water as patient can stand.

7. Very weak patients should be coaxed to take liquid nourishment every two hours at least.

8. For sore throat, gargle with hot salt solution, one teaspoonful salt to one pint of water.

9. For pain in the chest, rub chest and back twice daily with camphorated oil, with a few drops of turpentine added.

10. For profuse perspiration, rub patient dry with towels and (Continued on last page.) change clothing. Do not expose the patient.

11. For headache apply cold compress or ice bag to head.

12. Patient should not be allowed to sit up more than ten or fifteen minutes the first few times. Increase the time gradually and watch patient for signs of weakness.

13. Patient should not be allowed out of bed for any reason until temperature has been normal for forty eight hours or as doctor orders.

14. For delirious patients, keep ice to the head and watch very carefully.

15. Do not give medicines except the cathartic unless they are ordered by the doctor.

16. Care of the mouth:

Use salt solution – one teaspoonful salt to one pint backing soda or some good antiseptic mouth wash, if able to use tooth brush, patient should cleanse his mouth as often as necessary.

If patient is not able to do so, attendant should use swabs made of toothpicks wound with cotton and cleanse mouth thoroughly. Use vaseline or cold cream on lips for sores or for cracking.

17. Unless patient is very feverish, or perspiring profusely, do not insist upon daily bathing, guard against chilling at all times. Wash face and hands before and after eating.

18. Continue to give liquid diet until temperature is normal. Then give gruels, cooked cereal, milk toast, jellies, soft boiled egg.

19. Keep sick room quiet. Patient should get as much sleep as possible. No visitors.

Precautions

1. Avoid dust in the sick room. Do not dry sweep.

2. Care of sputum. Fasten paper bag to side of bed. Use toilet paper or paper napkins or newspaper and burn several times a day.

3. Scraps of uneaten food and mouth swabs should be burned immediately.

4. Milk containers should not be taken into patient’s room and should be boiled before returning to the milkman.

5. All handkerchiefs, linen, sheets, masks, towels, should be covered with cold water in the sick room. Boil for twenty minutes. Anyone may safely finish caring for the linen.

6. Where there is no toilet with running water, all mouth washes, bath water, discharges from bowels and bladder and all uneaten liquid foods should be disinfected with solution of chloride of lime before being thrown into the toilet. The toilet should be kept thoroughly scrubbed with hot water and soap.

7. To make chloride of lime solution: Mix thoroughly one half pound chloride of lime with one gallon of water. Use twice as much of this solution as the material to be disinfected. Allow to stand for one hour before emptying.

Care of the Family and Precautions for the Nurse

1. Keep other members of the family out of the room.

2. Keep patient’s dishes separate and boil twenty minutes before putting them into family use.

3. Scrub hands well with hot water and soap after handling the patient or the bed.

4. Keep your hands away from your face.

5. The attendant must be constantly masked, must wear large all-over apron in the sick room, changing it to a different one always, before entering any other part of the house. It is well to keep hair covered with an ordinary dust cap. When the attendant cannot stop to wash her own hands, door knobs, faucets, should be protected by scraps of newspaper which can be destroyed after each using.

6. Protect eyes if caring for a patient. Ordinary ten-cent glasses will do.

7. Families can help doctors, nurses and attendants by having hot water ready for use.

8. When taking care of a patient, the attendant should try to get enough sleep and rest. Take plenty of nourishing food. See the bowels move well every day. If necessary, take a cathartic every other night. Get out of doors every day.

To Avoid Getting the “Flu”

1. Get plenty of sleep and rest.

2. Take nourishing food, but do not over eat.

3. Avoid all crowds.

4. Avoid getting near anyone who is coughing, sneezing, spitting or who seems to have a cold.

5. Avoid using common towels, drinking cups, soap or anything handled by others in public places.

6. Wash hands thoroughly before eating.

7. See that bowels move regularly every day.

8. If you feel sick or “catch cold,” go to bed at once and [call] for the doctor.

source: The Nezperce Herald. (Nezperce, Idaho), 05 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Nezperce Herald., February 05, 1920, Page 2

[Editorial Page]

Nezperce wisely discontinued public gathering when the recent spared of influenza approached its gates. That this was an action of wisdom is substantiated by the fact that thus far no serious results have befallen locally, and though over twenty cases have been reported in the community, the attacks have been more or less mild and the outlook brightens. Communities which have not closed their places of public assembly have not fared so well. In the light of this experience, and the past distressing trial in this town and neighborhood, it is the general opinion that we should continue closed until the malady shows a general subsidence in the Lewiston country.

(ibid, page 2)
— — — —

The Nezperce Herald., February 05, 1920, Page 4

How to Get a Drink

Collector Edwards has announced the rules under which liquor may be procured, for medicinal purposes, under the revised, revamped, and reinforced prohibition amendment. The complete proceeding follows:

1. Patient develops a slight cold.

2. Speaks to wife about it; expresses opinion that hot whiskey might cure it, and suggests hurry call for the doctor.

3. Wife suspects faking, and administers white pine syrup and hot lemonade.

4. Patient develops grippe.

5. Wife becomes alarmed and sends for family physician.

6. Family physician satisfies self that patient is not camouflaging, but calls in nine other physicians, as required by law, to verify his findings and indorse [sic] the prescription for a half-pint.

7. Bertillion expert is called to take finger prints, foot prints, nose prints and breath prints of patient, all of which must be affixed to prescription for purposes of identification.

8. Patient is then required to fill out whiskey prescription questionnaire, giving date of birth, color of father’s hair, number of cousins who where addicted to drink, date on which he took first sip of intoxicating liquors, number of times arrested for drunkenness, complete list of every colds, etc., etc., etc.

9. Patient develops Spanish influenza.

10. Physicians then send finger prints, questionnaire, etc., to Washington to the Senate committee for the investigation of prescriptions for colds in the head and lungs.

11. Committee will summon patient to Washington for a Congressional hearing.

12. Congress will hold two-weeks’ quiz, and then require a two-thirds vote before prescription can be endorsed.

13. Patient will develop diphtheria.

14. Senate and House will finally endorse prescription, but send it to the War Department, Navy Department, Post Office Department, and Committee on Indian Affairs for filing purposes.

15. Patient will then return to home town on a stretcher, and present finger prints, prescription and photographs, questionnaire and Congressional papers to druggist.

16. Druggist will then require eleven good-character witnesses.

17. Druggist will then notify local revenue agents that prescription has been presented, and revenue agents will require carbon copy for card indexing.

18. Patient will develop pneumonia.

19. Druggist will go to cellar to fill prescription and find that his stock is exhausted.

20. Anti-Saloon League will raid drug store.

21. Patient will expire.

— New York Globe.

(ibid, page 4)
— — — —

The Nezperce Herald., February 05, 1920, Page 7

Local and Personal News Notes

The local physicians report the flu situation well in hand with some show of abatement in Nezperce and immediate vicinity, though several severe cases are still receiving attention. It is their opinion, however that the ban on public gatherings should be continued at least for another week.

An emergency hospital was opened at Lewiston last Saturday to aid in handling the influenza epidemic at that place and the “splendid organization of citizens and the Red Cross which is handling this was perfected by Miss Stella Booth,” says the Tribune. Miss Boothe only recently finished instructing classes at several points in Lewis county in Red Cross first aid work and hygienic care of the home, the good effect of which is being felt by our people in the present stress.

Miss Esther Smith went to Vollmer Tuesday to nurse Mrs. Wm. Stratton, who is ill of pneumonia. Mrs. Herbert Doggett is filling Miss Smith’s place at the switch board of the local Nezperce Cooperative Telephone exchange.

Geo. Tweedt, of Spokane, who came to Nezperce last week on a business mission, was ill of the flu for several days at the Nezperce Hotel, but is now able to be out.

Wm. Maher, of Lewiston, was called to Nezperce Monday on account of the serious illness of his nephew, Fred Maher, who died Tuesday.

(ibid, page 7)
——————–

Further Reading

Pandemics: 1918
Do flu outbreaks of past portend the future?

By Geoffrey Fattah Mar 2, 2005 Deseret News

1918UtahWomenMasks-a
Utah women wear masks to protect against the flu during the 1918 outbreak. Lynne Clark Collection

Jesse Boulton, 93, of Woods Cross remembers the winter of 1918 as a season of sorrow.

As a 7-year-old growing up in Granger, Wyo., she didn’t know why day after day, week after week, people in her town were dying.

“There was a family across the tracks. They buried two children, I believe, just small babies,” Boulton said.

Her mother kept her and her siblings home and away from their friends. When she was older, she learned that she had lived through one of the greatest disease pandemics in modern history.

Utah health statistics estimate that the flu killed one of every 25 Utahns who were infected. The late historian Leonard Arrington put the scope of the pandemic into perspective in his history of the influenza outbreak in Utah, published in the Utah Historical Quarterly.

“Approximately a fifth of the world population endured the fever and aches of influenza,” Arrington wrote, calling the event “the worst humanity has undergone since the Black Death (bubonic plague) of the fourteenth century.”

Widespread impact

Today, those who can recall the flu of 1918 are few. Many are in their mid-90s or over 100.

“I remember it was terrible. We couldn’t have school, church or anything,” said 91-year-old Margaret Callister, who spent her childhood in Panguitch and now lives in Delta. “Dead people were all around us, three or four to a family.”

Callister remembers her mother tying lumps of herbs around the necks of her brothers and sisters in an effort to keep them healthy. She does remember that her family was one of the lucky ones. Even with several of her brothers extremely sick, none of them died.

By Oct. 10, hundreds of cases were reported in Salt Lake City and Ogden, and health officials took action, prohibiting public and private gatherings “not held in the open air,” said the Deseret Evening News of Oct. 10.

From church meetings and funerals to private parties and political gatherings, any social event was ordered canceled or restricted. The Deseret Evening News reported that many political party officials were frustrated, wondering how they were going to nominate political candidates if they couldn’t hold caucuses. Even the funeral for LDS Church President Joseph Fielding Smith, who died Nov. 19, was restricted to a small number of family members.

Streets became near empty. Laws were passed, requiring anyone walking in public to wear a gauze mask. Spitting on the sidewalk could get you fined, or worse, jailed.

Police and health officials worked to enforce laws. People sweeping sidewalks had to water it down first to prevent dust. Soda fountains were ordered to use individual drinking cups, and workers at Utah Copper Company were advised by health officials to avoid communal drinking cups.

Although Utah went “dry” in August 1917, health officials allowed doctors to administer “spirits,” which were thought to help prevent the disease. Some took this the wrong way, as newspapers reported a few people were brought before judges for public intoxication.

By early November health officials began to see a reduction in reported infections. But then the war officially ended on Nov. 11, and hundreds took to the streets in Salt Lake City and elsewhere to celebrate. Arrington noted that Salt Lake City Police Chief Parley White decided it was futile to keep the crowds from celebrating.

The outcome was predictable. Several hundred new cases were reported in Ogden and Salt Lake City between Nov. 13 and Nov. 16.

The rural toll

In rural places like southern Idaho, the flu was also taking its toll.

“I remember the epidemic of that time,” said 103-year-old Russell Clark. “I saw the mortality rate around 50 percent. . . . There was a feeling of depression and sadness because neighbors, you see, were passing away.”

Growing up just outside Paris, Idaho, Clark said he remembers when his younger brother fell ill with a high fever.

“He was getting worse instead of better. So at midnight I called my parents out on the ranch,” Clark said, noting he and his brother were boarding in town to attend school. “They got their best team of horses and sleigh.”

Clark recalls his mother, who was a local nurse and midwife, saved his brother’s life by refusing to take him to the hospital.

Having spent many years as a surgeon himself, Clark said looking back, he saw his mother’s wisdom.

“They didn’t die of influenza per se. It was pneumonia because of a lack of nursing care to keep the patients rotated, and my mother was aware of that.”

There were horrifying accounts of patients drowning in their own fluids, even brain swelling brought on by the virus. But Clark said his mother stood vigil, rotating his brother in his bed. “He didn’t come down with pneumonia, and he made an uneventful recovery in two weeks,” he said.

By the start of the new year in 1919, there were an estimated 72,573 reported cases in Utah, with 2,607 deaths. Between 1919 and 1920, there were 19,226 cases and 308 deaths. In 1919 Utah had the second-highest death rate in the country from the pandemic, with 180.2 deaths per 100,000 population, Arrington wrote. Only South Carolina, with 189.3 deaths per 100,000, exceeded that rate.

For all the laws ordering people to wear masks and the partial lift on the alcohol ban, medical experts at the time did not know that the flu was caused by a virus, said Dr. Harry Gibbons, former director of the Salt Lake City/County Health Department. Gibbons, who has more than 40 years of public health experience, said the best thing health officials could have done was to limit public gatherings.

Excerpted from: [a longer and very interesting article.]
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Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 1)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 2)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 3)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 4)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 5)
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Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 8)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 9)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 10)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 11)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 12)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 13)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 14)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 15)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 16)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 17)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 18)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 19)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 20)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 21)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 22)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 23)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 24)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 25)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 26)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 27)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 28)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 29)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 30)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 31)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 32)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 33)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 34)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 35)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 36)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 37)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 38)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 39)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 40)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 41)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 42)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 43)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 44)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 45)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 46)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 47)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 48)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 49)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 50)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 51)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 52)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 53)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 54)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 55)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 56)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 57)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 58)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 59)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 60)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 61)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 62)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 63)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 64)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 65)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 66)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 67)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 68)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 69)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 70)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 71)

Idaho History Sept 12, 2021

Central Idaho Volcanoes

Idaho and Valley Counties

Mount Idaho

1881 Idaho Territory Map

1881-Idaho-MtIdaho— — — — — — — — — —

August 16, 1881
Idaho_SpokaneTimes_08-16-1881-a
Volcano In Idaho

Lewiston, I.T., Aug. 16. — A volcanic eruption occurred in the mountains about twenty miles east of Mt. Idaho on the 9th inst, sending forth fire and smoke hundreds of feet in hight [sic], and throwing rocks into the air which lit several miles from the scene of eruption. A column of black smoke is said to be still rising from the mouth of the volcano, which is visible fifty miles away. The shock attending the eruption was distinctly felt on Salmon river, seventy-five miles from the place. No one has as yet approached the scene of eruption.

— Blake. Spokane Times

— Newspaper Source found at: Washington Secretary of State Website Database, 2007
source: U.S. Volcanic Eruptions: “Non-Volcano Eruptions” Newspaper Clippings
— — — — — — — — — —

Daily Gazette – New Jersey August 18, 1881

A Volcano in Idaho

A dispatch from Lewiston, Idaho, says that there was a volcanic eruption in the mountain south of the South Fork of the Clearwater, about twenty miles east of Mt. Idaho, on the 9th instant. The mountain sent forth a column of fire and smoke several hundred feet in height, and a rock, which fell at a distance of several miles from the place of eruption. The shock was distinctly felt at Mt. Idaho, on the extreme west of the Camas Prairie, and at the mouth of Salmon River, a distance of about 75 miles.

Later news from Camas Prairie says that a column of smoke is coming from the opening, which is distinctly visible from the prairie. No one as yet has approached the place. Evidence of volcanic action at some former periods exist in many places in the immediate vicinity. So far as appears the opening is less than a thousand feet above the bed of the South Fork of the Clearwater, and within three miles of the Milner trail, between Mt. Idaho and Florence.
— — — —

Northern Christian Advocate – New York August 25, 1881

Volcano

There are reports of a volcanic eruption in Idaho. August 9th a column of fire and smoke is said to have burst from a mountain summit about 1000 feet above the south fork of the Clearwater, about 20 miles east from Mt. Idaho; the smoke continued to pour forth in great volume and to rise several hundred feet. A rock of considerable size was also thrown a number of miles from the mountain’s base. There were in the region distinct evidences of former volcanic action.
— — — —

The Owyhee Avalanche September 10, 1881

Idaho Volcano

The Nez Perce News of the 1st instant says: “Our big brother, Col. F.J. Parker, returned from the inside last night, and says that the supposed volcano is simply a chemical eruption at the head of a ridge of high altitude known as Devil’s back, a divide between the waters of the Salmon and Clearwater rivers. The trees on the mountain sides are shattered into kindling wood by the force of the explosion, and also set the woods on fire. The formation in the vicinage of the eruption is quartzite and limestone, and is terribly broken up. There were two explosions, the last twenty hours after the other, but not so loud.”

source: © PBC Idaho County GenWeb – Miscellaneous Published Articles and Newspaper Items From Idaho County and the Vicinity, compiled by Penny Bennett Casey
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Spokane Times – September 13, 1881 Idaho

Journalistic Push

— Fortunate is Walla Walla in the possession of a live journalist. Such an one is Col. Frank J. Parker, editor of the “Statesman.” He doesn’t allow nature to put on too much style without giving a pen picture of the “very latest.” On a recent occasion, a volcano was reported away over in Idaho, an account of which was first sent to THE TIMES by telegraph. We hadn’t time to run over and investigate the matter, and are very sorry to say that we were compelled to leave our readers in dreadful suspense till Brother Parker had resolved to be “the first to be there.” Always ready to go where duty calls, this enterprising journalist tore himself away from the endearments of civilization and pushed rapidly toward the frontier. His speed was like that of the wind. Passing Dayton, Lewiston and Pharoah’s Hill, he made the quickest time to Mt. Idaho. From there he traveled with a pack horse, and wore out the seat of a government pack-saddle. No one but an enterprising newspaper man would have suffered thusly. When Col. Parker reached the ragged edge of the greatest labyrinth of tangled forests ever designated on map or chart, and where no white man had ever been, he could learn less about the volcano than while at Walla Walla. Here he left the remnants of his pack train, and crawled into and through the primeval forest, with glory only seventeen miles away. On and on, manfully he climbed the mountain side, sparring himself onward and upward with the encouraging word, “Excelsior!”. He became weary, yet fainted not; lost the soles to his boots, yet halted not; hungry, and ate naught; but still he pressed manfully on with that peculiar trait of hoping against hope — so common with newspaper men — leading him on.

When Col. Parker had reached the summit of the mountains, where the volcano was supposed to be, imagine his great astonishment to find right before his eyes the very spot which might be the one he was looking for, and yet it might not. The mountain was charred and torn, was steaming a little, and sent up a peculiar and unpleasant odor. “Bravo! bravo!” shout Stanley; “Whooplah! it is the Devil’s Hole!” and as such it is known to this day.

— Newspaper Source found at: Washington Secretary of State Website Database, 2007

source: U.S. Volcanic Eruptions: “Non-Volcano Eruptions” Newspaper Clippings
— — — — — — — — — —

Fire (Not Volcano)

The fire having the widest repercussions for the area was one that occurred in August 1881 near Buffalo Hump. A settler accidentally got a patch of timber burning and, being all alone, he decided that the best way to attract attention and get help would be to set off a powder blast. The earth-shaking explosion and the leaping flames apparently brought him the assistance he wanted, but it probably attracted more attention than he had bargained for. In due course, the rumor had found its way into various newspapers throughout the West that there had been a volcanic eruption and an earthquake at Buffalo Hump.

source: A History of the Nez Perce Forest, page 71.  [h/t Kelsey McCartney FB]
see also:  Sister M. Alfreda Elsonsohn’s book “Pioneer Days in Idaho County” – per Kevin Norwood FB
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Thunder Mountain

1902 Thunder Mountain Mining District Map

1902-Idaho-ThunderMtn— — — — — — — — — —

Thunder Mountain Caldera

TowardsThunderMountain2016Looking towards Thunder and Red mountains showing the rim of the old caldera.

Photo: by Local Color Photography August 2016.
— — — — — — — — — —

Thunder Mountain Cauldron Complex 50-30 million BCE

ThunderMountainCauldronComplex(Cropped from Table 1 From Link and Janecke, 1999.)

citation: Challis Magmatic Episode By Laura DeGrey and Paul Link of Idaho State University Digital Geology of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

Temporal Evolution of the Thunder Mountain Caldera and Related Features, Central Idaho

by B. F. Leonard and R. F. Marvin USGS 1982

Abstract

The eruption of latite ash flows 50 million years ago began an episode of volcanic activity that lasted about 7 million years. Ash flows and minor lava flows, first latitic, then rhyolitic, built the Thunder Mountain field of Challis Volcanics to a height of 1,500 meters before subsidence of a nearly circular cauldron block 60-65 kilometers in diameter. Subsidence of the Quartz Creek cauldron, dated at 47 million years, was accompanied by development of the Cougar Basin caldera, within which the Sunnyside rhyolitic ash flow (an informal, locally recognized unit) was erupted from a central vent 46-47 million years ago. The eruption of the Sunnyside rhyolite was attended by development of the Thunder Mountain caldera, to which most of the Sunnyside was confined. The caldera was filled to shallow depth with volcaniclastic sediments containing plant remains of Eocene age. The caldera floor was tilted, perhaps by diapiric(?) emplacement of the Casto pluton about 44 million years ago. A minor vent near the caldera edge spilled latite lava across the tilted caldera floor. The highest latite flow has a date of about 43 million years: younger dates obtained from the flow very likely reflect argon loss from glass. The outpouring of latite lava is the last volcanic event recorded in the caldera. The dates of the earliest intrusives (47-million-year-old dikes of the cauldron margin) and of the latest (37-million-year-old dike of the Little Pistol swarm) indicate that intrusive activity began within the explosive stage of local volcanism and apparently ceased some few million years after extrusion of the youngest lavas of the field. Within this interval, the eastern margin of the cauldron was invaded by the Casto pluton, and myriad small stocks and dikes of rhyolite and latite were emplaced, mainly along the margins of the cauldron and its nested calderas. Twenty-eight new potassium-argon dates document the history summarized here.

Introduction

The Thunder Mountain caldera is the central feature of an irregular field of Challis Volcanics (Figure 1) that formed during the Eocene at the geographic center of the Idaho batholith. The caldera is old, has been deformed repeatedly almost from its inception to the present, and is virtually indistinguishable topographically from the jumbled fault blocks of the Salmon River Mountains in which it lies. Nevertheless, the caldera has evolved in much the same way as the better exposed and better studied calderas of Oligocene to Pleistocene age in the western United States. We present here a geologic sketch of the local volcanic field and an outline of the temporal evolution of the Thunder Mountain caldera and related features. The main conclusions of this report were given earlier as an abstract (Leonard and Marvin, 1975).

Formality requires the naming of two subsidence features that were glossed over in the abstract. The Thunder Mountain caldera nests within a larger caldera, here named the Cougar Basin caldera (Figure 1). The northern and eastern sectors of the Cougar Basin caldera are hard to reach and poorly known, and our attempts to date the subsidence of the caldera isotopically have been frustrated by the difficulty of preparing suitable mineral separates. For these reasons, the Cougar Basin caldera receives little more than its name in this report. Both calderas are outlined by remnants of their wall rocks, but part of the subcircular outline of the calderas is now masked by a northeast-trending linear structure, too complex to be labeled a medial graben, that passes through the calderas and ends near the north margin of the cauldron. The cauldron – the large volcanic subsidence structure that delimits the Challis Volcanics of the Thunder Mountain field – is here named the Quartz Creek cauldron (Figure 1). The northern sector of the cauldron nearly coincides with the principal trough of the 1,800-gamma contour of the aeromagnetic map of Cater and others (1973, plate 1). The southwest sector coincides approximately with the smoothed 1,600-gamma contour of an aeromagnetic map kindly made available by Don R. Mabey, U. S. Geological Survey.

Figure1Geologicsketch-aFigure 1. Geologic sketch of Thunder Mountain caldera and related features. Compiled by B. F. Leonard from mapping at various scales by Cater and others (1973, plate 1), B. F. Leonard (unpublished), and J. G. Brophy and Gordon May (unpublished).
(for larger size go to link to paper)

Principal place names used in the text are shown on published topographic maps of the U. S. Geological Survey, chiefly on the Big Creek and Yellow Pine 15-minute quadrangles and the Challis and Elk City 2-degree quadrangles. The name Land Monument Mesa is not shown on published maps. The name is for the mesa 1.7 kilometers north-northeast of the Dewey mine, Thunder Mountain district. Most of the sample locations (Figure 2) are referred to maps available when the fieldwork was done. Since then, new maps have replaced or supplemented some of the old ones. As anyone who wishes to visit the sample sites will soon find only the newer maps available, the principal changes are noted here. The former 15-minute quadrangles have been subdivided into the Wolf Fang Peak, Big Creek, Edwardsburg, Profile Gap, Yellow Pine, Stibnite, Big Chief Creek, and Chilcoot Peak 7 1/2 minute quadrangles; the Monument, Safety Creek, and Rainbow Peak 7 1/2 minute quadrangles now supplement the 2-degree quadrangles for the area northeast and east of Thunder Mountain. The elevations of sample sites are reported in feet because elevations are so shown on the topographic maps of the region. Horizontal distances have been converted from English to metric units. Plate 1 of Cater and others (1973) shows reconnaissance geologic information for all but the western part of the area treated in our report.

Figure2Locationofsamples-aFigure 2. Location of samples. Hare from topographic map of the 3late of Idaho, U. S. Geological Survey, scale 1.500,000
(for larger size go to link to paper)

Geologic Sketch

The Quartz Creek cauldron that delimits the Thunder Mountain field is crudely circular in plan, 60-65 kilometers in diameter, bounded on the west and northwest by a system of ring faults and an attendant swarm of dikes, and along its eastern sector invaded by the Eocene Casto pluton (Figure 1). Radial faults and subsidiary ring fractures dissect the cauldron block, but their pattern is largely obscured by a host of younger faults produced by regional rotational stress and by recent regional and local subsidence. Within the cauldron block, vertical displacement along major subsidence faults exceeds several kilometers, causing plutonic Precambrian intrusives, low- to high-grade Precambrian metamorphic rocks, and various facies of the Cretaceous Idaho batholith to lie in disarray against one another and against the Challis Volcanics.

The Challis Volcanics of the Thunder Mountain field comprise (1) two units of regional extent, (2) a pyroclastic and volcaniclastic filling unit, confined to the Thunder Mountain caldera and its environs, and (3), as a minor part of the filling unit, late flows confined to the caldera but separated from other components of the caldera filling by an erosion surface of at least local extent. The Thunder Mountain caldera and its environs, and (3), as a minor part of the filling unit, late flows confined to the caldera but separated from other components of the caldera filling by an erosion surface of at least local extent.

The units of regional extent are a lower, latitic unit and an upper, rhyolitic unit. Both are largely ash-flow tuffs and their welded equivalents. The lower unit of latite tuff and breccia is 400-500 meters thick. It rests on rocks of the Idaho batholith and older metamorphic complexes, locally contains consolidated mudflow debris rich in blocks of batholithic granodiorite and grus derived therefrom, contains at least two thin flows of latite, and in composition ranges without evident order from latite to quartz latite. The latitic unit is exposed only at the cauldron edge and at the periphery of the main area of Challis Volcanics; its extent throughout the field is conjectural. The upper unit of rhyolite tuff and welded tuff is 1,000 – 1,100 meters thick. It rests on the latite unit but laps onto the adjacent plutonic and metamorphic terrane. In addition to the predominant rhyolitic pyroclastics, the upper, rhyolitic unit contains one or more thin flows of rhyolite, two or more of andesite, and a few lenses of volcanic sandstone and granodiorite-bearing mudflow debris. The disposition of the two units of regional extent (Figure 1) indicates that they were formed before major subsidence of the cauldron, but the vent or vents from which they issued have not been identified.

The filling unit, confined to the Thunder Mountain caldera and its environs, has three subunits. The lowest is the Sunnyside rhyolite.

The informal name Sunnyside rhyolite is adopted in this report for a subunit of local interest in the Challis Volcanics of the Thunder Mountain field. Mining men and geologists familiar with the Thunder Mountain district customarily use the name Sunnyside rhyolite, and it is appropriate to accede to their custom. The informal name Sunnyside rhyolite corresponds to the equally informal rhyolite of Sunnyside (Leonard, in Cater and others, 1973, p. 46) and to the Sunnyside rhyolite crystal tuff, Sunnyside rhyolite tuff, Sunnyside tuff, and Sunnyside welded tuff of Shannon and Reynolds (1975).

The Sunnyside rhyolite is a crystal-rich tuff, evidently the product of a single ash flow more than 200 meters thick, that is dominantly a single cooling unit with local, thin cooling units near the top. The major cooling unit is thought to have a thin, basal vitrophyre (seen only as slivers along faults), a thick medial zone of welded tuff with discontinuous vapor-phase zones near its upper contact, and a capping of nonwelded tuff, perhaps 10-20 meters thick, that thickens northeastward toward the distal end of the flow. The distribution of pumice fragments and biotite flakes in the Sunnyside rhyolite suggests that the ash flow issued from a vent near Thunder Mountain, at the center of the volcanic field.

Current work by E. B. Ekren and Gordon May (oral communication, 1982) leads them to conclude that the Sunnyside rhyolite of Leonard’s usage comprises deposits from two major ash flows, and that multiple cooling units may be present in the lower ash flow. Thus our treatment of the Sunnyside rhyolite in this report may be too simple.

The Sunnyside rhyolite is overlain by the Dewey beds. The informal name Dewey beds is adopted in this report for a subunit of local interest in the Challis Volcanics of the Thunder Mountain field. Mining men and geologists familiar with the Thunder Mountain district customarily use the name Dewey beds, and their name for the subunit is conveniently adoptable here. The name corresponds to the volcaniclastic subunit of Leonard (in Cater and others, 1973) and to the Dewey beds, Dewey conglomerate, Dewey conglomerates, Dewey strata, Dewey unit, Dewey volcaniclastic beds, and Dewey volcaniclastics of Shannon and Reynolds (1975).

The Dewey beds consist of water-laid volcanic conglomerate, volcanic sandstone, mudstone, carbonaceous shale, a little lignite, and at one place lake beds of laminated carbonaceous mudstone and airfall(?) tuff. This largely volcaniclastic subunit, rich in material eroded from the Sunnyside rhyolite, is well exposed only at the Dewey mine, where its drilled thickness exceeds 90 meters. The outcrop, near site 5 of Figure 2, is too small to show on Figure 1. Fragmentary plant fossils from the volcaniclastic subunit are Eocene (J. A. Wolfe, written communication, 1967; oral communication, 1968, 1981). Associated with the volcaniclastic rocks is a black, carbonaceous breccia of uncertain stratigraphic position and irregular distribution, interpreted as ancient mudflow debris. Carbonaceous mudstone, perhaps representing an ancient swamp deposit, was exposed by mining in 1981, after fieldwork for this report was finished.

An angular unconformity of a few degrees separates the Dewey beds from a pair of thin, vesiculartopped, anomalously young-looking latite flows derived from a small volcanic center within the caldera at Lookout Mountain, 10 kilometers northeast of Thunder Mountain. The flows are indicated on Figure 1 as flows of Lookout Mountain.

The part of the filling unit below the latite flows is economically significant, for the upper part of the Sunnyside rhyolite, undetermined parts of the Dewey beds, and some of the black breccia contain the low-grade gold deposits of the Sunnyside and Dewey mines (Leonard, in Cater and others, 1973, p. 45-52).

Much younger than the Tertiary filling unit is water-laid Pleistocene gravel that may once have formed a thin veneer on the southern half of the caldera floor. The gravel is now found only as relics along minor faults that dissect the complex graben of the Thunder Mountain district.

Deposition of the gravel marked the end of the caldera as a topographic depression. Most of the former sump is now a high, rolling upland, a few hundred meters lower than the fringing alpine peaks and mostly separated from them by canyons formed in narrow grabens. The caldera floor is perched 1,500 meters above the main drainage from the Thunder Mountain district.

Tertiary intrusives of the area comprise dikes, stocks, and a plutonic mass of batholithic dimensions – the Casto pluton – which dominates the southeast sector of the cauldron. The dikes range in width from less than 1 meter to more than 100 meters, and in length from a few meters to more than 1 kilometer. Most of the dikes stand vertically. They are dominantly rhyolitic or latitic in composition, and commonly they are porphyritic, but their fabric varies widely. The dikes, if counted, would surely number several thousand, most of them concentrated in swarms, and most of them external to the two calderas. Two swarms, Smith Creek and Little Pistol, are labeled on Figure 1, but they are merely parts of larger arrays of dikes that extend beyond the limits of the illustration. Locally within these swarms the dikes lie side by side, without intervening relics of country rock, yet no dike is seen to cut its neighbors.

A few stocks are present within the dike swarms, but many more are clustered within the Challis Volcanics between the margins of the Thunder Mountain and Cougar Basin calderas, at sites 12 kilometers southwest and 15 kilometers northeast of Thunder Mountain (Figure 1). The stocks are nonequant in shape, seldom more than a few hundred meters in mean diameter, variable in fabric, commonly fault bounded, locally riddled by dikes, and – like the dikes – dominantly rhyolitic or latitic in composition. A few stocks, dikes, and less simple intrusives are dioritic or quartz dioritic.

The dikes, stocks, and pluton are related to structural settings or events in ways that make it desirable to treat the intrusives individually or as geographic and chronologic groups, according to the problems they present rather than as the class of all intrusives.

Two great silicified zones within the cauldron block but outside the Cougar Basin caldera contain many of the gold, silver, antimony, and tungsten deposits of the region. The silicified zones are some kilometers long and tens or hundreds of meters wide. The western zone is in part coextensive with the Smith Creek dike swarm and in part peripheral to the western margin of the cauldron. The eastern zone is associated with ring fractures of the Cougar Basin caldera (see subsequent discussion of the stocks of upper Indian Creek). The silicified zones and their mineral deposits receive scant attention in this report because they have not been adequately dated. …

Conclusion

The eruption of latite ash flows 50 million years ago began an episode of volcanic activity that lasted about 7 million years. Ash flows and minor lava flows, first latitic, then rhyolitic, built the Thunder Mountain field of Challis Volcanics to a height of perhaps 1500 meters before the subsidence of a nearly circular cauldron block having a diameter of 60-65 kilometers. Major subsidence, dated at 47 million years, was accompanied by development of the Cougar Basin caldera, within which the Sunnyside rhyolitic ash flow was erupted from a central vent 46-47 million years ago. Eruption of the Sunnyside ash flow was attended by development of the Thunder Mountain caldera, to which most of the Sunnyside ash flow was confined. Collapse of the Thunder Mountain caldera cannot be precisely dated. An upper limit is either the 47-million-year date of cauldron subsidence or more likely, we think, the 46 to 47-million-year date of eruption of the Sunnyside rhyolite. A likely lower limit is the 44.6-million-year date of the Century Creek stock, a small intrusive nearly central to the caldera. Water-laid volcaniclastic debris, derived mainly from the Sunnyside rhyolite, was spread thinly over the floor of the collapsed Thunder Mountain caldera, trapping plant remains of Eocene age. The floor of the Thunder Mountain caldera was tilted gently southwestward, perhaps by diapiric emplacement of the Casto pluton. A minor vent 8 kilometers northeast of the center of the caldera erupted latite cinders, bombs, and lava of the Lookout Mountain unit. Thin flows from this vent spread southwestward across the caldera floor. The highest latite flow has a date of about 43 million years; younger dates obtained from the flow very likely reflect argon loss from glass. The outpouring of latite lava is the last volcanic event recorded in the caldera, whose evolution extended from middle Eocene to late Eocene time. (The informal designations of Eocene time are keyed to the preferred radiometric dates, recalculated according to 1977 decay constants, of Harland and others, 1971.) During the Pleistocene, part of the defunct caldera again served as a depositional site, this time for gravels carried in by meltwater from small alpine glaciers of the bordering highlands.

At present levels of exposure, the earliest indication of Tertiary intrusive activity is given by quartz diorite and latite dikes of the outer ring-fracture zone of the Quartz Creek cauldron. The dikes have a date of 47 million years. The latest indication of intrusive activity is given by a latite dike, dated at 37 million years, from the Little Pistol dike swarm. Thus the evidence points to a beginning of intrusive activity during the explosive stage of local volcanism and a cessation some few million years after extrusion of the youngest lavas of the Thunder Mountain field. Between the extremes of 47 and 37 million years, the eastern margin of the cauldron was invaded by the Casto pluton, and myriad small stocks and dikes were emplaced along the margins of the cauldron and its nested calderas. Small rhyolite stocks grew near the center of the Thunder Mountain caldera.

The Casto pluton presents a special problem, different from that of the stocks and dikes. The most reliable date, analytically, for the pluton is 47.8 million years. That date may represent the time of crystallization of the core of the pluton at some considerable depth beneath the cover rocks. The pluton did not, we think, ascend to invade the cauldron margin till much later, perhaps 44-45 million years ago.

The dates of the Challis Volcanics of the Thunder Mountain field do not differ significantly from the dates reported by Armstrong (1974) for the Challis Volcanics of the type area near the town of Challis: about 43-50 million years for the former and about 45-50 million years (recalculated) for the latter. The comparison excludes dates of ours that we have discussed as aberrant and dates of Armstrong’s for which he expressed some reservations. However, the Challis Volcanics extend far beyond the areas whose rocks have been radiometrically dated in our study and in Armstrong’s Within the large expanse of the Challis Volcanics of central Idaho there are, we believe, at least seven major caldera-related volcanic fields whose extrusive products, similar in composition and locally lapping over from one field to another, may be nearly contemporaneous but not rigidly so. Until the local sequences have been established and dated, appropriate limits for “Challis time” are only approximately definable. Meanwhile, it is worth noting that although a good many Tertiary intrusives in central Idaho are coeval with the Challis Volcanics as currently datable, some intrusives are younger. The 37-million-year date of hornblende latite from the Little Pistol dike swarm, for example, is an Oligocene date if referred to Harland and others’ (1971) preferred date of 38 million years (39 million years, recalculated) for the base of the Oligocene, and is statistically excludable from the set of 43 to 50-million-year dates that represent reliably dated Challis Volcanics.

Acknowledgments

We thank these members of the U. S. Geological Survey for their contributions to our work: Jack A. Wolfe for examination of plant fossils; H. H. Mehnert and V. M. Merritt for assistance with potassiumargon analyses; and Alan J. Busacca, Bruce T. Brady, G. T. Cebula, Ezekiel Rivera, and Michael Sekulich for mineral separations. Mr. Busacca and former field associates Neil Dale, Stephen J. Reynolds, and John Schloderer helped collect the rock samples. Don R. Mabey provided supplementary geophysical data. E. Bartlett Ekren and David H. McIntyre examined a suite of thin sections. Mr. McIntyre and Frederick S. Fisher reviewed the report. Melvin and Jim Ed Biggers, Sweet, Idaho; Lafe Cox, Yellow Pine, Idaho; and Larry Rowe, Caldwell, Idaho, efficiently managed pack strings and provided support in base camps. Eleanor Leonard and Ruth Leonard O’Neil kindly served as unpaid camp cooks.

Full paper 19 pages:
— — — — — — — — — —

Geology Examples

Idaho Batholith Quartz Creek
092810Rock-b

Sunnyside Rhyolite – folded
111610Fold-in-Rhyolite-b

Tuff with quartz crystals
TuffQuartzCrystals2010

Photos: by Local Color Photography 2010
— — — — — — — — — —

Challis Magmatic Episode

By Laura DeGrey and Paul Link of Idaho State University

Extent and timing of the Challis Magmatic Episode

The Challis volcanic episode was active during the Eocene, between ~52-39 Ma, with the bulk of the eruption between 51-45 Ma. The Challis volcanic episode is part of a wide-spread Eocene volcanic belt that covered a large part of the Eocene northwestern United States and southwestern British Columbia

EoceneVolcanicBelt-aFigure 1. Eocene volcanic belt in the northwestern United States. From Moye et al.,1988.

Geologic History of the Challis Magmatic Episode

The Challis Volcanic Group covers approximately 25,000 square kilometers in Idaho , making it the largest of the Eocene volcanic fields (Figure 2). The Eocene geologic setting of the Challis volcanics is commonly accepted as an extensional basin related to the subduction of the oceanic Farallon Plate beneath the continental North American Plate. Prior to Eocene time, before ~60 Ma, the convergence rate of the Farallon and North American Plates was very fast.

ChallisVolcField-aFigure2. Extent of Challis volcanism in Idaho. From Link and Janecke, 1999.

The angle of subduction was shallow and the subducting slab of the Farallon Plate reached as far as eastern Wyoming underneath the North American Plate (Figure 3). This far-reaching subducting slab set the stage for widespread volcanism along the northwestern side of the United States and southwestern British Columbia.

Subduction-aFigure 3. Drawing showing shallow subduction and then migration and steepening of the subducting plate.

Around 56 Ma, the subduction rate slowed and the angle of subduction became much steeper. During the steepening of subduction, the subducting slab migrated westward (Figure 3). Following the westward migration of subduction, backarc extensional basins developed and triggered widespread igneous activity that youngs in a westward direction. The extensional zone is oriented northeast-southwest and contains many high-angle and low-angle normal faults, which commonly dip toward each other, and form rift-grabens (Figure 3). These normal faults make up the Trans-Challis Fault Zone.

Igneous activity occurred in two main phases. The first phase began around 52 Ma and included the intrusion of shallow granitic plutons 3 – 4 miles below the surface. The second phase included volcanic eruptions. The main phase of eruption occurred between 51 – 45 Ma, and consisted of effusive and voluminous intermediate and mafic lava flows as well as highly explosive silicic ash-flows. Less violent and less voluminous silicic eruptions continued until approximately 39 Ma. Intrusive activity in the form of rhyolitic domes, rhyolitic plugs, rhyolitic dikes, and rhyolitic stocks accompanied the later stage volcanism. The violent eruptions of rhyolitic ash tuffs and ignimbrites caused the collapse of many calderas between 49 – 45 Ma.

continued: Digital Geology of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

see also:

Regional Geologic Setting and Volcanic Stratigraphy of the Challis Volcanic Field, Central Idaho

Falma J. Moye / William R. Hackett / John D. Blakley / Larry G. Snider

Introduction

Early Tertiary geologic history of the northwestern United States was characterized by a short-lived but intense magmatic episode from 55 Ma to 40 Ma. That episode resulted in an areally extensive and compositionally diverse belt of volcanic and plutonic rocks extending from southern British Columbia across northeastern Washington and central Idaho and into Montana and Wyoming. Although the time equivalence of this belt of rocks has been recognized and some basic geologic, geochemical, and radiometric work has been completed, the Eocene magmatic event remains poorly understood within the context of Eocene tectonics of the northwest.

The Challis volcanic field of central Idaho is the largest and most diverse of the Eocene volcanic fields, both in composition and in variety of volcanic deposits. Because it is dissected to subvolcanic levels, geologists can study the geochemical relationships among cogenetic volcanic and intrusive units and the internal structures of volcanic and hypabyssal complexes.

In this paper we summarize current knowledge of the geology of the Challis volcanic field, including its regional stratigraphy, geochronology, and geochemistry.

continued: Guidebook to the Geology of Central and Southern Idaho
———————-

Idaho History Sept 5, 2021

Idaho 1918-1920 Influenza Pandemic

Part 71

Idaho Newspaper clippings February 2-4, 1920

Idaho photos courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

February 2

The Daily Star-Mirror., February 02, 1920, Page 1

19200202DSM1

19200202DSM2
Flu Situation Still Improving
Number Of New Cases Show Marked Decrease – Conditions Much Better

The the influenza situation is much better not only in Moscow but almost everywhere is the gist of reports received today. Chicago’s new cases have dropped from 2563 a week ago Saturday to about 500 Sunday. The number of new cases in Moscow is below the number of convalescents released as cured. Every day now sees more people released from quarantine than are placed under quarantine. Dr. Leitch, city health officer, gives an encouraging report with some excellent advice, Dr. Leitch has issued the following statement of conditions in Moscow. He says:

Health Officer’s Statement

“The ‘flu’ situation of the past week is as follows: For the first five days of the week, the number of new cases reported, averaged 48 for each day; for Friday and Saturday the average cases reported was 28 for each day, for Sunday 27 cases. The total cases reported for January was 456. Out of this total there are two deaths, Mr. Duffy and Mr. Rich. The case of the Burr boy was not reported in the total number, as he was brought in from the country. There are still a few severe cases.

“From the report it can be seen that the large majority of cases are recovering, but extreme care must be taken with all cases, as complications may occur at any time. All exertion must be omitted by the patients.”

Fon du Lac Scared Stiff

Fon du Lac, Wis. — Fon du Lac’s population is nearly panic stricken over the rapid spread of the influenza epidemic.

For the past week there have been an average of fifty cases reported daily, but yesterday and today the report showed 87 and 92. A dozen people have died.

Tonight the health board imposed a ban on all public meeting places.

Fewer Cases in New York

New York. — There were 904 fewer influenza cases reported today than on Saturday when 4,895 cases were reported. There was also a falling off of 146 pneumonia cases from yesterday’s record of 811.

Decrease in Chicago

Chicago. — New cases of influenza reported today numbered 591 against 860 Saturday, and pneumonia cases decreased from 352 to 246. Influenza caused 98 deaths, as compared with 122 yesterday, and 75 persons died of pneumonia, a decrease of ten.

St. Louis Schools Close

St. Louis, Mo. — There were 430 cases of influenza reported here today, bringing the total since January 19, to 3,578. All public and private schools will close tomorrow at noon.

Improvement at Nezperce

Nezperce. — There are indications of improvement in the influenza situation at Nezperce and everything was pronounced in good shape by County Health Officer Dr. E. Taylor, who was here today from Kamiah. There have been no deaths at Nezperce but a few new cases are reported each day. The cases are generally mild but a strict quarantine is being maintained and it is proposed to keep on the ban until the disease has been entirely eradicated.

Death at Grangeville

Grangeville. — Mrs. George Manning died today from influenza-pneumonia, with which she was stricken about ten days ago. Mrs. Manning was about 33 years of age and is survived by her husband and three daughters.
— —

19200202DSM3
Moscow Mourns For John H. Rich
Popular City School Superintendent Called By Death Saturday Night

Professor John H. Rich, superintendent of Moscow city schools, is dead.

His death occurred at 9 o’clock last Saturday night. He went to a local hospital suffering with influenza just a week before and his case was regarded as serious from the start. Mrs. Rich was also stricken with the disease but recovered and was able to be up and about the hospital when the summons came to her husband. She was taken to the home of her brother, Thomas Asbury, where she is being cared for.

Professor Rich’s death came as a shock to his thousands of friends, few of whom knew of his illness until the announcement of his death was made. He was such a strong, robust man, of such fine physique that few would have believed the “flu” would prove fatal in his case so quickly. Only a short time ago he was examined for life insurance and the examining physician stated that he had examined few men as physically fit as Professor Rich.

The funeral arrangements have not been completed. The funeral will probably occur Thursday or Friday. His parents are expected here from Cedar Rapids, Iowa, and the date of funeral will not be set until it is known when the relatives will arrive. The body is at Grice’s undertaking parlors. …
— —

19200202DSM4Wants $10,000 To Fight Influenza In Seattle

Seattle. — Dr. H. M. Reed, city health commissioner, yesterday applied to the finance committee of the city council for an appropriation of $10,000 to be used in meeting the needs incident to the influenza run in Seattle. But 13 cases of influenza were reported in Seattle yesterday and there is no occasion for alarm, Dr. Reed said. The emergency will be over in two weeks, he predicted.
— —

Idaho County Has Woman Deputy Sheriff

Boise, Idaho. — The town of Grangeville, Idaho, has a full fledged woman deputy sheriff, Miss Florence Murray. She has been given the same work as a regular deputy and will not only gather evidence for prosecutions, but will make arrests as well. Miss Murray, according to state officials here, has the distinction of being the first woman deputy sheriff ever named in the state of Idaho.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 02 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., February 02, 1920, Page 3

City News

The funeral services of Samuel Sletto, who died of influenza, will be held at Troy Tuesday and the body will be brought to Moscow for burial Tuesday afternoon. Mr. Sletto was 38 years of age. His brothers, Thomas, Fred and Martin, have arrived from Champion, Alberta.

Robert Leitch, who is now employed at the jewelry store of Bolles and Anderson, is confined to his home with influenza. Mr. Claiborne, the watch maker, is also ill.

Miss Villa Leeper, primary teacher of the Viola schools, left today for her home at Peck, Idaho. The Viola schools will remain closed at least until February 9, on account of the influenza condition.

Miss Thresa Baken, who teaches in the Kendrick schools, returned home today. The Kendrick schools will be closed for two weeks.

The play by the Drama Club at Guild Hall has been postponed until Tuesday of next week, February 10.

The annual meeting of the Women’s Home and Foreign Missionary Society of the Swedish Lutheran church, which was to have been held Friday afternoon at the home of Mrs. V. Ramstedt, has been postponed until further notice.

(ibid, page 3)
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., February 02, 1920, Page 4

Post Office Force Better

Postmaster Morgareidge, whose illness has caused his friends much uneasiness, is reported better today and it is believed he is gong to escape pneumonia, with which he was threatened Saturday night and Sunday. Assistant Postmaster Sudderth has so far recovered from his illness to be able to be back at work, although quite weak. He did not have the influenza however, he says he had enough of that last year to last a life time.
— –

Parsons Family Recovering

L. F. Parsons, executive secretary of the University of Idaho, has recovered from a short but severe attack of “flu” and is today attending to his work, although quite weak.
— —

Highway Meeting Postponed

Owing to the fact that two of the commissioners of Moscow highway district (No. 2) are under quarantine no meeting of the district board was held this afternoon as had been planned. G. P. Mix and Joseph Hazeltine are quarantined with “flu” although both have recovered from the disease, but their physicians refused to permit them to attend the meeting which was to have been held today. The date of the meeting will be announced as soon as it becomes definitely known.
— —

Juliaetta Schools Closed For One Week

Juliaetta. — There are about 25 to 30 cases of “flu” in Juliaetta. The schools have been ordered closed for one week, at the end of which time decision will be made by the school board as to whether the period of closing will be extended.

Principal J. W. Buchanan of the Juliaetta public school left this morning for his home at Hayden Lake, he [is] to be summoned by phone when the school will be ready to reopen.

The cases of influenza at Juliaetta are all of a mild type, there having been no serious cases so far.

(ibid, page 4)
— — — — — — — — — —

Main Street, Wardner, Idaho (1)

WardnerFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

February 3

The Caldwell Tribune. February 03, 1920, Page 1

19200203CT1

Marble Front

There will be no meeting of the Good Cheer club Thursday February 5, owing to the sickness in the T. C. Pearson home.
— —

Harry Rogers and Tom Glenn, two city employees with the street department are undergoing an enforced vacation because of illness.
— —

Persons who have concluded during the past few days that the telephone company has suspended operations here are asked by H. C. Groesbeck, local manager, to bear in mind that telephone girls, as well as any one else, are subject to mumps and influenza. Monday, six operators were ill with one of the two diseases and telephone service suffered in proportion.

source: The Caldwell Tribune. (Caldwell, Idaho), 03 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. February 03, 1920, Page 3

Interesting Items From Surrounding Territory

Lone Star

There will be an entertainment and box social at the Lone Star school house Friday night, February 13. Everybody invited.

Mr. Franklin Brown is confined to his bed with the mumps.

Miss Westanna Linner is ill with the mumps.

Francis Faris is going to school again, having recovered from the mumps.

Roswell

A number of families in our community are having the influenza. It is running light this year and no one is seriously ill.

Supt. W. E. Goodell is having a light attack of the influenza and has not been in school this week.

Miss Vannie Lister, one of the high school teachers, is ill at her home at Star.

Mrs. Tom Rooney is quite ill at her home with influenza.

Funeral services were held last Sunday at Sterry memorial church for Mrs. Mable Hervey Sloan, wife of Edward G. Sloan. Mrs. Sloan died in Boise from a complication of diseases.

Lake Lowell

Greandma Blacksma passed away Tuesday morning January 27 at the home of her son of pneumonia. Grandma had been poorly for years. She had a complication of diseases and a few days before her death was stricken with pneumonia of which she was unable to rally. …

Mr. W. L. Gibbons went to Meridian to help care for a brother that is quite ill at that place.

Mrs. Kay Gibbons and Roy Jr., are ill with the influenza.

Verna Altizer is on the sick list this week.

Nurse Walston who was caring for little Hubert Weeks returned to Caldwell Sunday.

Mr. Kimes who has been suffering from a bad cold, has taken a back set and it is feared he now has influenza.

Mumps, scarlet fever and tonsillitis are still raging over the district.

(ibid, page 3)
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. February 03, 1920, Page 4

[Editorial Page]

Influenza

Nothing is to be gained by refusing to acknowledge that influenza long expected has assumed an epidemic form that promises to rival the 1918 record from the point of prevalence.

There is less sense in developing an influenza scare. Sanity, common sense and reasonable precautions by every individual can do much to combat the disease. It is today a well recognized fact that fear is a contributing factor in spreading disease by decreasing immunity to its ravages.

(ibid, page 4)
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. February 03, 1920, Page 7

19200203CT2
Influenza Has Grip On State
Dread Disease, Increasing In Virulence, Shows Rapid Spread

Boise, Feb. 1. — A total of 2,488 cases of influenza, 18 influenza deaths and 15 pneumonia deaths have been reported to this office for the week ending January 31st.

The hopeful note in the situation is to be found in the fact that many of the communities have been able to bring the situation under control. Reports received toward the end of the week diminished materially. The virulence of the infection seems to be gradually increasing, the influenza and pneumonia deaths showing a marked increase of the previous week.

Following are the total cases:

Ada County:
Boise … 168
Kuna … 40
Star … 82
Meridian … 30
Rural … 42

Bannock County:
Pocatello … 8
Bancroft … 2
McCammon … 3
Rural … 14

Bear Lake County:
Montpelier … 280
Rural … 66

Benewah County:
St. Maries … 122
Rural … 8
Plummer … 2

Blain County:
Carey … 48

Boise County: 22

Bonner County:
Laclede … 4

Bonneville County:
Idaho Falls … 5

Canyon County:
Nampa … 439
Parma … 62
Caldwell … 12

Camas County:
Fairfield … 3

Caribou County:
Soda Springs … 12

Cassia County:
Burley … 13

Clearwater County:
Orofino … 97

Custer County:
Rural … 13

Elmore County:
Mountain Home … 3
Glenn’s Ferry … 2

Franklin County:
Preston … 1

Fremont County:
Ashton … 1
St. Anthony … 1

Gem County:
Emmett … 1

Idaho County:
Grangeville … 1
Stites … 25

Jefferson County:
Roberts … 3

Jerome County:
Jerome … 1

Kootenai County:
Rose Lake … 8

Latah County:
Moscow … 207
Potlatch … 3
Bovill … 4

Lewis County:
Ilo … 5
Rural … 5

Lincoln County:
Shoshone … 1

Madison County: 78

Minidoka County: 146

Nez Perce County:
Lewiston … 103
Lapwai … 31
Culdesac … 69
Leland … 10
Gifford … 13

Owyhee County: 39

Payette County:
New Plymouth … 2
Payette … 4

Shoshone County:
Wallace … 17
Rural … 18

Twin Falls County:
Twin Falls … 61
Buhl … 1
Rural …36
Filer … 14

Valley County: 150

Washington County:
Cambridge … 83
Weiser … 49
Midvale … 1

(ibid, page 7)
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. February 03, 1920, Page 8

Items of Interest From Surrounding Territory

Arena Valley

The Z. B. Barker family called at the W. E. Owens home at Wilder last Sunday. Miss Mildred is ill with a light attack of influenza.

Robert Pierce who has been entertaining the mumps for some time is able to be out again.

Mrs. Walter Aten has been very ill with the influenza for the past week but is improving.

Miss Djupe, county nurse, has offered to come here and form a free nursing class among the women of the valley. There are 15 lessons in the course and this is something every home needs. All who wish to join or to inquire further about the class can get information from Mrs. Z. B. Barker, Mrs. Walter Matson or Mrs. Clarence Moler.

Burnard Barker was taken very ill Thursday morning and Dr. Mitchell pronounced the case to be influenza. He is more comfortable at this writing.

Mrs. Victor Gibson and Irene, returned Friday night from Crane, Ore., having left her sister greatly improved. On account of the terrible epidemic of influenza there, Mrs. Weston remained to help nurse relations.

Dr. Mitchell was called to the West home Friday night where almost the entire family have the influenza.

Alfred Suiter went home from school Friday with the influenza.

The Klare family, on the Hudson place, have several sick also.

C. of S. Notes

Edward Jones of Parma, a student at the college is ill at his home.

Ezra Hinshow of Greenleaf, the new elected president of the College of Idaho associated student body was ill at his home during the special meeting of the students at which he was elected.

A large number of the girls of the College of Idaho have been teaching for the past few days and a number of the boys have served their time at different positions for people who had the influenza.

(ibid, page 8)
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. February 03, 1920, Page 9

Ten Davis News

La Verne and Winston Miller are recovering rapidly from the influenza.

Carol Gahley went back to Boise Wednesday. She has been confined to her home here with influenza for the past week.

Sidney McLaughlin stayed home from college this week to help his father while Marvin is sick with influenza.

A. E. Dunn and family have been sick this past week.

Cross Evans is ill with the influenza.

Chub Johnson has been sick for several days with tonsillitis this week.

Grandma Dahley is staying at the Willard Barthles home caring for little Ruth who has pneumonia. She is improving slowly.

The bridge by McLaughlin has been fixed and the traffic has been resumed. The banks of the creek by Videnes have been graded down so the [mail] carrier can ford the creek now. L. E. Small delivered the mail this side of the Hollow the first of the week.

(ibid, page 9)
— — — — — — — — — —

Bonners Ferry Herald. February 03, 1920, Page 4

19200203BFH1

Local Pick-ups

Mrs. B. A. Barnes has been ill the past week with an attack of Spanish influenza.

Ed Miley and George Harvey have been on the sick list this week with Spanish influenza.

H. A. Gale has been home the past week and most of the time has been suffering from an attack of Spanish influenza. He is a representative of the International Harvester Company, with headquarters in Spokane.

J. A. Welch, chairman of the board of county commissioners, and J. B. Brody, county auditor, left Sunday afternoon for Boise, Idaho, to attend the sessions of the county commissioners of the various counties of the state, which will convene today. County Commissioner Chambers is ill at his home near Copeland with the Spanish influenza and was unable to attend the meeting and Auditor Brody went in his stead.

The basketball game scheduled for last Friday evening between the Bonners Ferry high school and the Kalispell, Mont., high school, was postponed. The Kalispell team had a game with Libby on Thursday night but on account of the sickness of Libby players the came was called off. Kalispell wanted Bonners Ferry to play Thursday night instead of Friday but several home team players were ill and not in condition to play so this proposal was rejected.

Mrs. Caroline W. Flood, superintendent of the county schools, has received notice from Miss Ethel Redfield, state superintendent of public instruction, that $1,695.86 has been apportioned Boundary county from the public school interest fund.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 03 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Bonners Ferry Herald. February 03, 1920, Page 5

Local Pick-ups

Clare Yahne has been seriously ill the past week with an attack of Spanish influenza. At last reports he was considerably improved in health.

Mr. and Mrs. Joe Neumayer, residents of the Porthill district, have been in the city several days the past week. Mr. Neumayer was sick the first of the week with the la grippe and the latter part of the week Mrs. Neumayer also took sick with the disease.

(ibid, page 5)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., February 03, 1920, Page 1

19200203DSM1

19200203DSM2
School Children Barred From Shows
City Health Officer Issues Warning to Theatres – Conditions Better

Only 19 new cases were reported Monday, the smallest number in 10 days, and conditions generally are much improved. Last week the average number of cases for the first five days was 48 new ones daily. This week starts off with 27 Sunday and but 19 Monday. There are very few serious cases at this time and more cases are being released from quarantine every day than are being quarantined. Taken as a whole the situation is very encouraging.

Spokane is being hard hit, there being 419 new cases reported there in the past two days and five deaths were reported yesterday. Lewiston reports conditions greatly improved with no deaths yesterday. Grangeville reports one death and one other case that is regarded as serious. But the conditions throughout the country are generally better.

Dr. Leitch, city health officer, has forbidden school children attending the theatres while the school is closed. This is due to the fact that when there is no school the children are not examined as they are daily while school is in progress. Dr. Leitch issued two orders which are here given. They follow:

School Children Barred

Owing to the closing of the public schools, all school children are forbidden to attend picture shows, with or without inspection, until further notice.

Any picture show house known to violate this order will be closed until the influenza epidemic is passed.

F. M. Leitch, City Health Officer

Removing Quarantine Flags

All persons wishing quarantine cards removed should call their attending physician and when he deems it safe to remove the same he will order the police to take it down but not before the last patient is clear of fever at least four days.

F. M. Leitch, City Health Officer

Much Worse in Spokane

Spokane. — Owning to continued spread of the influenza epidemic in Spokane, health officers yesterday ordered placing of restrictions on theatres and public schools. Effective today, all theatres must close between 4:30 p.m. and 5:30 p.m. for ventilation, and no children are to be permitted in schools who come from homes where illness prevails. Three thousand children and forty teachers are absent from school, either because of illness, fear of illness or illness in the family.

There were 349 new cases yesterday, with six deaths. One physician, however, reported 104 of the cases, some of them a week old.

More Cases, Fewer Deaths

Chicago. — Deaths from influenza and pneumonia in the last 24 hours decreased from the number reported Sunday, but new cases increased more than 300.

Influenza totaled 802 patients with 89 deaths and new cases of pneumonia numbered 374 with 69 deaths.

Heavy Increase in Kansas

Topeka. — With more than 11,980 cases of influenza in Kansas and new cases reported by the hundreds every day the state board of health last night issued a state-wide call for volunteer nurses.

Twenty deaths from influenza and 4481 new cases were reported since Saturday.

Colorado Closes Public Places

Boulder, Colo. — All places of public assembly, including the University of Colorado, were ordered closed yesterday by the board of health on account of influenza.

Gov. Burnquist Seriously Ill

St. Paul. — There was practically no change last night in the condition of Governor Burnquist seriously ill with pneumonia which followed influenza.

Montana Not Badly Off

Helena. — For the week ending Saturday night last, there were reported to the state board of health 1022 new cases of influenza within the state of Montana. There were three deaths of influenza for the same period.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 03 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., February 03, 1920, Page 3

City News

The home department of the Historical club, which was to have met Friday at the home of Mrs. H. O. Perry, is indefinitely postponed, to comply with the health regulations. Notice of the meeting will be given later.

The public library will be closed until further notice.

Mrs. James Casey of Coeur d’Alene arrived in Moscow today to visit her daughter, Miss Marion Casey, a student at the university. Miss Casey is ill of influenza and is now at the girls’ hospital at Mrs. Hutton’s home.

Dr. F. M. Leitch is ill at his home of catarrhal fever. His condition is not serious and he is improving.

Mr. and Mrs. Max Reitze and two children are ill of influenza, on the N. Williamson farm north of Moscow. Mrs. F. Reitz and Miss Ida Yates of Moscow are assisting in nursing. Mrs. Reitze’s sister, Miss Anna Steensma of Juliaetta arrived here today to assist also.

Victor Orr, has returned to his work as cashier at the Northern Pacific station, after an illness of influenza. Mrs. Orr and family have all been ill of the same disease and one of the smaller children is still quite seriously sick.

President E. H. Lindley is expected to return home this evening from southern Idaho, where the educational campaign has been cancelled on account of the epidemic condition.

(ibid, page 3)
— —

* catarrhal fever (1) An obsolete, nonspecific term once applied to various respiratory and upper respiratory infections, including the common cold, influenza, pneumonia and bronchopneumonia.
— — — — — — — — — —

Warm Lake, Idaho ca. 1963 (1)

WarmLake1963Fritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

February 4

The Challis Messenger., February 04, 1920, Page 1

19200204CM1

19200204CM3
Quarantine Is Established Against Flu

Owing to the fact that the epidemic of Spanish Influenza is increasing rapidly throughout the state and its rapid approach to the section, where we have no cases of the disease, it was thought best by County Health Officer, Dr. C. L. Kirtley, and the people of Salmon river in general, to establish a quarantine again on Willow creek summit in an effort to keep the disease out of this section.

A year ago much trouble was caused by some parties evading the quarantine and it is hoped that we will not have a recurrence of it again.

There are now over 3,000 cases of flu in the state, 18 influenza deaths and 15 pneumonia deaths have been reported throughout the state up to the first of this month.

Lower Big Lost and [?] Little Lost river valleys are reported as having many cases, over 50 cases being reported in Arco alone.

No quarantine has been established between here and Pahsamaroi or up-river points as no flu has developed there to date.

source: The Challis Messenger. (Challis, Idaho), 04 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Challis Messenger., February 04, 1920, Page 5

Items About People You Know

To Boise — County Commissioners Bennetts and Campbell left last Sunday morning for Boise, where they went to attend a meeting of the County commissioners of the state. Mr. Campbell, upon arriving at Mackay, decided that the flu was a little too prevalent on the outside and returned to Challis Monday on his way to his home near Clayton.

Mrs. Harrington Ill — Mrs. J. A. Harrington has been a sufferer from quinsy for the past week. Montez Harrington, who has been suffering from typhoid fever, is improving now.

(ibid, page 5)
— —

* Quinsy: An old term for a peritonsillar abscess
— — — —

The Challis Messenger., February 04, 1920, Page 7

Idaho And Idahoans

A mild form of influenza has appeared at Lewiston and the authorities are taking precautions to keep the disease checked. No serious cases are reported.

It is not permissible under Idaho laws for garages to sell denatured alcohol, even for the purpose of keeping automobile radiators from freezing. The state attorney general gives this opinion in the answer to queries from the department of law enforcement.

Two members of the state constabulary in conjunction with the county sheriff’s office, made several raids in Burley one day last week. Several homes were entered where large quantities of home made beer was found.

The first instance of death in Twin Falls from drinking “corners’ cocktails,” was recorded January 23. The victim is J. B. Grubbs, 65, an elderly man, who is said to have died from a concoction of extracts and “dope.”

A man giving the name of H. R. Chase, The Dallas, Ore., was arrested and seven suitcases filled with whisky were seized by revenue officers on a westbound Oregon Short Line train at Caldwell.

(ibid, page 7)
— — — —

The Challis Messenger., February 04, 1920, Page 8

19200204CM2Quarantine Regulations County Health Officer

To the Public Generally;

Whereas a contagious and infectious disease known as influenza has again made its appearance in many states and particularly in certain parts of Custer county, public health demands that prompt and efficient measures be taken to prevent the spread of said disease to those portions of Custer county not yet infected.

1st. Now, therefore, it is ordered by the County Health Officer of Custer county that all of that portion of Custer county which drains into Salmon River shall and is hereby declared to be a quarantine district for the purpose of preventing the introduction of Influenza into the said district. Said quarantine district and this order creating the same shall remain in full force until the further order of the Board of Health of said Custer county, Idaho.

2nd. All persons are prohibited from entering said district without a permit from the County Health Officer.

3rd. The County Health Officer is hereby authorized and empowered to appoint as many quarantine guards and to create as many quarantine districts as may be necessary to enforce these rules and regulations.

4th. The County Health Officer of Custer County, Idaho, shall cause to be printed suitable permits and quarantine cards in harmony with law and those regulations and place a sufficient number of said permits and quarantine cards at each quarantine station with the quarantine guards stationed there to meet all such necessary demands. It is hereby and herein further ordered and directed that the County Health Officer shall provide all quarantine guards at each quarantine station with “yellow flags” of suitable size to be used by said quarantine guards in placing or causing same to be placed on the vehicle in which said person or persons are traveling.

5th. All persons coming into said district and desiring to remain therein shall be quarantined for a period of four days, at the home of such person or persons, in case they have a home in said district, and if not, then in some suitable place prepared and created by the County Health Officer.

6th. All persons having business to transact in said district may enter said district and attend to the business, and depart again from said district; but all homes or other places to which such persons [?] allowed to [?] and enter must be quarantined for a period of four days; sick person or persons so entering under the provision of this section shall stop at the first quarantine [?] the road [?] that such person or persons [?[ quarantine district, and procure a written permit therefor; said permit shall direct such person or persons to travel the most direct public highway to and from [?] or their homes, or place where they [?], without a [?] and that each home or place where such person or persons shall go or stop, shall be quarantined by the placing of a [?] quarantine card up in a conspicuous place on said residence or place where such person or persons shall go or stop as aforesaid; said quarantine card shall be supplied such person or persons by said quarantine [guard], such quarantine to be and remain in full force and effect for a period of four days from and after such person or persons shall so enter as aforesaid; and in the event any such person or persons or others in said home shall become afflicted with said disease then in such case, said quarantine of said home or place shall be and remain in full force and virtue until ordered discontinued by said County Health Officer. It is further hereby and herein provided that all persons entering said quarantine district as aforesaid, shall place in a conspicuous place on the vehicle in which they travel a “yellow flag” and keep said flag thereon for a period of four days provided they remain in said quarantine district for such period of time; said flag to be applied by the quarantine guard.

7th. All persons desiring continuous passage through said district shall be granted such privilege, but such person or persons shall first procure from such quarantine guard a permit and flag therefore, and all homes and other places in which they may be permitted to stop and enter shall be quarantined for a period of four days, as provided in Rule Sixth hereof.

8th. The County Health Officer is hereby empowered and directed to cause to be printed large quarantine cards to be posted up in a conspicuous places at each quarantine stations so created and aforesaid, which said quarantine card shall correctly describe the boundaries of the Quarantine District hereby created.

9th. Every person or persons, company or corporation violating any of the provisions of this Order will be prosecuted as in such case made and provided.

An emergency existing therefore, this Order shall be and is in full force and effect from the date hereof.

Penalty for violations of this Order is $50.00 fine or imprisonment in the county jail for ninety days or by both such fine and imprisonment.

Dated at Challis, Idaho, this 4th day of February, 1920.

(ibid, page 8)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., February 04, 1920, Page 1

19200204DSM1

19200204DSM2
Fewer Number Of Influenza Cases
Only Fifteen New Cases Reported Tuesday, Lowest Number To Date

The decrease in number of new influenza cases in Moscow continues with gratifying regularity. Only 15 new cases were reported Tuesday as compared with 19 Monday, 27 Sunday, 28 Saturday, and 48 per day for the five days preceding last Saturday. Many more were released from quarantine and the work of taking down influenza cards posted on Moscow homes is going forward rapidly.

There have been no deaths since Monday evening and the cases that were regarded as serious are reported better today. The outlook is indeed encouraging and there is a bright prospect that school may be opened in Moscow Monday as it will be in Lewiston. All reports from Moscow and surrounding territory shows that conditions are rapidly getting better and there is every reason to believe the crest of the waves has past [sic] and conditions will continue to improve.

Better at Lewiston Today

Lewiston reports conditions much better than they have been for several days. While Lewiston has a number of severe cases and is expecting more deaths the prediction is made that within 10 days normal conditions will prevail. Lewiston schools will reopen Monday after having been closed for several weeks.

Another Death at Grangeville

Grangeville. — George D. Stansbury, a retired farmer of the Winona section, who has been making his home in Grangeville, passed away early yesterday morning, a victim of influenza that developed into pneumonia. He leaves a wife and five children. Mr. Stansbury’s death is the fourth due to the epidemic.

Elmer Kennedy, a carpenter, ill with the disease, has received a setback after entering upon a convalescent stage and while his condition is unsatisfactory it is not serious. The general situation is much improved.

Death at Clarkston

Clarkston. — Mrs. T. H. Seay of Grangeville died here last night. She had been in the city but a short time, the cause of death being pneumonia. The remains will be taken to Grangeville for interment.

Marked Increase at Spokane

Spokane. — Influenza continued on the increase in Spokane yesterday, 257 new cases being reported for the day. There are a total of 1354 cases in the city. No deaths had been reported up to late last night.

225 Cases at Sunnyside

Yakima, Wash. — Message from Sunnyside yesterday stated that 225 cases of influenza were under care of two doctors and that Mrs. R. C. McCredie, president of the state board of health, had asked that the entire city be quarantined and all places of public assemblage closed.

Decrease at Chicago

Chicago. — Deaths from influenza in the last 24 hours totaled 109 and 782 new cases were reported. Pneumonia cases numbered 330 with 75 deaths.

Severe in Kansas

Topeka, Kan. — New influenza cases reported in Kansas yesterday totaled 3619 with 21 deaths.

67 Deaths in California

Sacramento, Cal. — Sixty-seven deaths in California from influenza were reported the last 48 hours. This established a high record, it was said. New influenza cases reported numbered 1408.

4000 a Day in Illinois

Springfield, Ill. — New cases of influenza in Illinois are developing at the rate of 4000 a day, it was announced.

7000 Cases in Copenhagen

Copenhagen. — Seven thousand new cases of influenza have been reported in this city the past week.

Epidemic in Mexico

Mexico City. — Influenza has reappeared in epidemic form in Mexico. Many cases have been reported in this city and 60 soldiers have been found ill with the malady. Reports state influenza has appeared in the states along the United States frontier.

$25,000 Reward For Cure

Denver, Col. — The Denver Post yesterday announced it would pay $25,000 to the physician finding a cure for influenza. The money is to be paid after the cure has been approved by the Rockefeller foundation and Johns Hopkins university, Baltimore.
— —

19200204DSM3
Colfax Claps Lid On All Gatherings
Emergency Hospital Opened, Theatres, Schools and Pool Rooms Closed

Colfax, Wash. — Because of the rapid spread of influenza within the last day or two, there was a meeting of all the physicians yesterday afternoon at Dr. Mitchell’s office, attended by the school directors. It was decided to close all places off public gathering until the epidemic can be checked. The order of the health officer became effective Sunday night and all picture shows, cigar stores and pool halls were closed and there were no evening services in the churches. The schools are also closed.

Cots and equipment have been received from the Spokane Red Cross and the emergency hospital in the K. P. building is ready, and two patients are being cared for there. Health Officer Benson reporting that there will probably be about 15 taken there during the day. The emergency hospital is in charge of Miss Thompson, a nurse from the hospital, assisted by Mrs. McManus. It is estimated that there are about 100 cases in town, nearly all of them having developed since Friday.
— —

Show Registration Cards

Students of the university, wishing to enter Moscow theatres will be required to show their registration cards. This is in order to identify them. There is no ban against university students attending the shows but the management is forbidden to admit students of the high school and grade school but university students will be admitted if they show their registration cards.
— —

D. W. Miller Has the Flu

D. W. Miller, well-known in Moscow, has the influenza in Chicago where he went recently to take a position as assistant professor of English in the Chicago University. He had resigned a similar position at Washington State College, Pullman, to accept the Chicago offer which pays $400 per year more salary than the Pullman job. Mr. Miller went east to begin work and secure a place to live and Mrs. Miller, nee Helen Patton, came to Moscow to remain with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Patton, until her husband prepared a home for her in Chicago. This morning she received a telegram announcing that Mr. Miller has influenza, but whether in mild or severe form was not stated.
— —

Airplanes Used in Taking Census
Every Mode Of Travel Being Used By Government Census Enumerators

Everything from aeroplanes to snowshoes is being used by the agents of Uncle Sam in taking the 1920 census of the United States. About the only modern method of transportation either on, or over, or below land or water that has not been employed in enumerating Uncle Sam’s nieces and nephews seems to be the submarine.

Aeroplanes have come in handy in enumerating the dwellers on the islands off the coast of Florida; yachts and rowboats have been used in the harbors of the country; native canoes have been in demand among the Hawaiian Islands; “flivvers” are being used everywhere; the tried and trusty mule team has carried the census takers out on the desert regions; and snowshoes have become the trusted aides of the census gathers [sic] in the northern states and Alaska.

Enumerator Turns Rescuer

In the central part of New York state, near Oswego, a few days ago an enumerator making his rounds on snowshoes arrived at an isolated farm dwelling only to find that an ablebodied man was needed more than a census gatherer as the man of the family had been sick in bed for several days and the farm animals were suffering for lack of food and water. The census man, like any good neighbor would, stopped long enough to do the chores, dig out paths through the deep snow and put things in shipshape order before continuing this journey.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 04 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., February 04, 1920, Page 3

City News

Mr. Ben Hadsall is a victim of the disease of influenza and is quite ill at his home on the south Washington street.

Mrs. E. H. Davidson left yesterday for her home at Spokane after assisting in nursing through a siege of influenza, her parents, Mr. and Mrs. C. L. Hoy and family.

Dr. H. L. Axtell and family were released from quarantine today. All members of the family were ill, Mr. Axtell having had a relapse. They had influenza.

Mrs. G. F. Savage was called to Pullman today by the illness of her mother, who has contracted influenza.

Prof. and Mrs. H. H. Conwell were released today from quarantine after a siege of the “flu.”

Mrs. M. M. Snow and daughter, Mrs. Doyle and grandson, are improving from an attack of influenza. Mrs. Judd of Spokane is the attendant nurse.

The Royal Neighbors will not hold its regular meeting Thursday night on account of the influenza situation.

(ibid, page 3)
————–

Further Reading

The Woman Who Made History by Answering the Phone

By Jennifer Latson September 1, 2015

TelephoneGirls1-aTelephone operators sitting in front of a long switchboard at the Cortlandt Exchange in New York City around the turn of the century Hulton Archive / Getty Images

The first telephones were hard enough to use without the added harassment of the teenage boys who worked as the earliest switchboard operators — and who were, per PBS, notoriously rude.

It was Alexander Graham Bell himself who came up with a solution: replacing the abrupt male operators with young women who were expected to be innately polite. He hired a woman named Emma Nutt away from her job at a telegraph office, and on this day, Sept. 1, in 1878, she became the world’s first female telephone operator. (Her sister, Stella, became the second when she started work at the same place, Boston’s Edwin Holmes Telephone Dispatch Company, a few hours later.)

As an operator, Nutt pressed all the right buttons: she was patient and savvy, her voice cultured and soothing, according to the New England Historical Society. Her example became the model all telephone companies sought to emulate, and by the end of the 1880s, the job had become an exclusively female trade.

Many women embraced the professional opportunity, which seemed like a step up from factory work or domestic service. But the work wasn’t easy, and telephone companies were draconian employers, according to the Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities, which notes:

Merely to get the job, a woman had to pass height, weight, and arm length tests to ensure that she could work in the tight quarters afforded switchboard operators. Operators had to sit with perfect posture for long hours in straight-backed chairs. They were not permitted to communicate with each other. They were to respond quickly, efficiently, and patiently — even when dealing with the most irascible customers.

It soon became clear to these operators why the teenage boys who preceded them had so often talked back to their customers. One woman, in an anonymous 1922 op-ed for the New York Times, reported saying “number please” an average of 120 times per hour for eight hours a day (and sometimes at night) — and biting her tongue when she was excoriated for every possible connection problem, “including the sin of sending your party out to lunch just when you wanted to reach him.”

Working under these conditions for impossibly meager pay (Nutt herself made $10 a month working 54 hours a week) ultimately drove the women to organize. In 1919 they went on strike, paralyzing the telephone-dependent New England region — and winning a wage increase.

continued: Time Magazine
— — — —

see also:

Do you have what it takes to be a 1920s telephone operator?

April 27, 2016 by lupachi1927

TelephoneGirlsEmmaNutt-aEmma and Stella Nutt work alongside two male operators in 1878. During this time, telephone operators were expected to stand for long periods. Chairs came later. Photo Source: telcomhistory.org

continued:
——————

Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 1)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 2)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 3)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 4)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 5)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 6)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 7)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 8)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 9)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 10)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 11)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 12)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 13)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 14)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 15)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 16)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 17)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 18)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 19)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 20)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 21)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 22)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 23)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 24)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 25)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 26)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 27)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 28)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 29)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 30)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 31)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 32)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 33)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 34)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 35)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 36)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 37)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 38)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 39)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 40)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 41)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 42)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 43)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 44)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 45)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 46)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 47)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 48)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 49)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 50)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 51)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 52)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 53)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 54)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 55)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 56)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 57)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 58)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 59)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 60)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 61)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 62)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 63)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 64)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 65)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 66)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 67)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 68)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 69)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 70)

Idaho History Aug 29, 2021

Idaho 1918-1920 Influenza Pandemic

Part 70

Idaho Newspaper clippings January 30-31, 1920

Idaho photos courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

January 30 (continued)

The Kendrick Gazette. January 30, 1920, Page 1

19200130KG1

19200130KG2
The Flu Situation

From reports received from all over the country the flu is as much of a menace now as it was at any time last winter. Many deaths have occurred all over the country and the epidemic seems to be present in almost every community. A report from a reliable source stated there were eight deaths in Lewiston Tuesday. It is also reported there are 250 cases in Clarkston and 300 in Moscow.

Kendrick has had a few light cases but the number may be increased at any time as the disease spreads so rapidly. Cases in six families have been reported up to late Thursday afternoon. This is exclusive of three or four cases that have recovered.

The ridges tributary to Kendrick have reported a number of cases a few of which were quite severe.

At an unofficial meeting of the members of the Village council it was decided not to put a ban on public gatherings but the health officers requested that all public meetings be dispensed with whereever possible. No dances will be allowed under any consideration.

source: The Kendrick Gazette. (Kendrick, Idaho), 30 Jan. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Kendrick Gazette. January 30, 1920, Page 6

19200130KG3All “Flu” Cases To Be Isolated
“Flu” Again Appears
Seems to Be Spreading West From Chicago

Seattle — Strict isolation of all influenza and pneumonia cases in the state of Washington has been ordered by the state health commissioner. He urged all health officers to prepare hospitals and engage nurses beforehand for influenza patients in case epidemic should threaten.

Warning Given Montanans

Helena — After a study of the influenza in the east, watching its progress westward, the secretary of the state health board has proclaimed warning against the return of the “flu.”

He says the west can not hope to escape, but he believes it will be in mild form. Deaths depend largely, however, upon individual conduct, he said. He urges all persons who develop colds to go to bed and stay there until danger of complications is past.

Fargo Has 300 Cases

Fargo, N. D. — Fargo has more than 300 cases of influenza.

Quarantine was adopted at Moorhead, across the Red river from Fargo. Other cities are guarding against recurrence of last year’s epidemic.

Epidemic Hits Minnesota

St. Paul — Dr., Charles E. Smith, Jr., executive officer of the state health board, late Sunday proclaimed the influenza epidemic, and called on all health officers to join in the enforcement of regulations, for its control. Government regulations were put into effect again in Minnesota by Surgeon General Rupert Blue of the United States public health service.

(ibid, page 6)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., January 30, 1920, Page 1

19200130DSM1

19200130DSM2
“Flu” Situation Shows Improvement
Fewer New Cases, No Deaths And Many Recoveries In Moscow Is Report

With fewer new cases, many recoveries and several very severe cases in which little hope for recovery was held yesterday, reported much better today, the “flu” situation in Moscow is encouraging. The same is true of nearly all sections. Several towns and cities report slightly increased numbers of new cases but fewer deaths are reported and it is believed the crest of the wave has passed. No deaths have been reported in Moscow since that of Joseph Duffy. Mrs. Duffy, whose condition was regarded as very serious, is reported much better today. Mrs. Robert West, whose condition gave alarm yesterday, is believed to be improved today.

The method of handling the situation adopted by Dr. Leitch, city health officer, seems to be bring [sic] satisfactory results and people are getting over the panicky feeling that was so manifest earlier in the siege. Lewiston reports conditions improved with but one death yesterday compared with three Wednesday, five Tuesday and Monday.

Epidemic Nation Wide

Washington – Steady spread of influenza over the country was indicated by reports to the health service today from state and city health officers. No marked increase in any particular locality, however, was noted.

2,000 N. Y. Phone Girls Down

New York — The total number of new influenza cases reported today was 4,076, a decrease of 883 from yesterday. Pneumonia cases reported totaled 649, a decrease of 37. There were 100 influenza deaths, an increase of 33 over yesterday, and 136 from pneumonia, an increase of 18.

More than 2,000 telephone operators were reported ill.

Spokane Emergency Hospital

Spokane, Wash. — A downtown fire station here tonight was turned into a hospital for firemen ill with influenza, and eight patients at once transferred to it. The fire fighting apparatus was transferred to another station. Owing to the increase in influenza cases, a large building formerly used for a skating rink was turned into an emergency hospital, under the auspices of one of the large hospitals. Eighty-four new cases were reported today, bringing the total to 307. There were three deaths from ordinary lobar pneumonia, but none from influenza-pneumonia.

Taking Hold in Kansas

Topeka, Kan. — Influenza continued to spread rapidly throughout Kansas today, reports showing a total of 1,424 new cases as compared with 778 yesterday.

Two Yakima Deaths.

Yakima, Wash. — Two deaths from influenza reported this morning have stirred the Yakima chapter of the Red Cross to action. Sixty beds were ordered today from Seattle, and an emergency hospital will be opened if conditions get worse. Miss E. King, Red Cross nurse, has been assigned to special duty here.

Epidemic in Rome

Rome — Deaths from influenza on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday, in Rome aggregated 122.
— —

19200130DSM3Schools Will Be Closed

Owing to the light attendance the school board announces that Moscow schools will remain closed, after today, until further notice. This does not mean anything serious, but so many are remaining away from school because of fear, and so many teachers are out that it was thought best to make no further attempt to continue school until conditions improve. Physicians believe that in another week the situation will clear up and the rest of the influenza wave will have passed.
— —

Fred Collins’ Family Sick

Fred Collins, city mail carrier, is off duty owing to illness in his family. His route is being carried by Mr. Cady. Mr. Collins is not sick but his wife and children are quarantined and he has to remain at home to care for them. This takes Sam Hall, of the post office force, from the volunteer teaching work he took up in the high school. Mr. Hall is quite disappointed over the closing of the schools. He said: “In one of my classes there were 21 in attendance out of a total of 26 enrolled, and in another of my classes there were nine in attendance out of 15 in the class.” Mr. Hall has hoped to be able to do some more “Good Samaritan” work for the school but closing the schools will end his work there. He has, however, plenty of work to do in the post office with Postmaster Morgareidge and Assistant Postmaster Sudderth and one carrier out of service.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 30 Jan. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., January 30, 1920, Page 2

[Editorial Page]

Moscow people are acting sensibly in the influenza matter. There is no panic and no one is badly frightened. The sick are being well cared for and those who are not sick are going on about their business. If this attitude can be maintained – and there is no reason why it cannot – the situation will grow better and in a very short time the epidemic will be but a memory.
— —

What’s In A Name?

Canadian physicians are ridiculing physicians of the United States for calling the present epidemic influenza. The doctors of our northern neighbor says it is nothing more nor less than the “grip” which visits the United States every winter. It makes little, if any difference what the disease is called, its results are deadly enough to cause precaution to be taken. The name amounts to but little more than did the name used by the little boy.

The boy had a dog and his little sweetheart had a cat. The cat had a piece of meat. In taking the meat from the cat a tragedy was enacted, the little boy tried to tell the little girl about it and to “break bad news gently.” He said:

“Your kitty had a piece of meat and my dog thought it was his.” Here he was interrupted by the little girls who was a stickler for proper language and who said: “Please don’t say thought. Dogs don’t think. They instinct.”

The boy’s reply is what applies to the present situation. He said: “I don’t care whether he thought or instincted, he killed your cat, just the same.”

(ibid, page 2)
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., January 30, 1920, Page 3

City News

Mrs. Dave Greear went to her home in Troy today, after remaining in Moscow over a week to take care of her children and grand children, who have been ill of the “flu.”

Mrs. J. J. Martin of Stites arrived today in Moscow to assist in nursing some of the influenza patients at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Bert Crow.

The young people of the Christian church have postponed indefinitely the banquet they had planned for February 3.

John Sudderth, assistant postmaster, has been confined to his home with sickness. He has not been quarantined and it has not been decided that he had the “flu” which he had in severe form last year, but he has been ordered to remain at home until he gets well.

(ibid, page 3)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Idaho Recorder. January 30, 1920, Page 2

19200130IR1

19200130IR2Flu Is Coming, Warns State Health Officer
Mild Form of Epidemic is Spreading Throughout Western States, Reports Show

Helena, Jan. 24 — After a study of the influenza situation for several weeks and by keeping in close touch with the progress it has made toward the western states, Dr. W. F. Cogswell, secretary of the state board of health, made a statement yesterday in the form of a warning against the return of the flu.

While Dr. Cogswell says the western progress of the influenza indicates that it cannot be hoped to escape a recurrence of it, he says it will appear in a mild form. He says that in the event of a recurrence, the number of deaths depend largely on individual conduct. He advises persons who develop colds to go to bed and remain there until danger of complications is over.

Casper, Wyo., Jan. 24 — With more than 125 cases of influenza reported in Casper to the county health officer, and two deaths in the last three days, further precautions as to prevention of the spread of the disease have been issued. All the cases are light.

Fargo, N. D., Jan. 24 — There are more than 300 cases of influenza in Fargo, most of them developed in the last four days, according to reports at the city health department.

St. Paul, Jan. 24 — State health authorities agreeing that a new epidemic of influenza has arrived in Minnesota, Dr. Charles. E. Smith, Jr., executive officer of the state board of health, yesterday proclaimed the disease epidemic and called on all local health officers to join in the enforcement of state regulations for its control.

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 30 Jan. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Idaho Recorder. January 30, 1920, Page 3

Northwest Notes

Influenza has appeared in epidemic form in several communities in Idaho.

(ibid, page 3)
— — — —

The Idaho Recorder. January 30, 1920, Page 8

The Flu

We are in receipt of a communication from Ernest E. Laubaugh, M. D., chief of the bureau of public health service, to the effect that influenza has appeared in epidemic form in several communities in Idaho.

The chief claims it is highly contagious and rapidly spreading and asks that every effort be put forth to keep it down and under control. Rigid isolation must be established in all cases and prompt reports rendered.

We sincerely hope that our community may escape a return of this much feared epidemic but should it come again we feel there is no occasion for scare for under proper treatment at the outbreak no deaths should result.

(ibid, page 8)
— — — — — — — — — —

Montpelier Examiner. January 30, 1920, Page 1

19200130ME1

19200130ME2
Death Angel Visits Four Home During Past Week

Mrs. Mary Human died at her home in Liberty Sunday morning, January 18. Grandma, as she was familiarly called, was 80 years of age. … [survived by 11 children, 71 grand children, and 25 great grand children.] …

Within the past week the Angel of Death has visited three homes in Georgetown, in two instances taking therefrom the wife and mother and in the third the husband and father. The death’s were caused from influenza and complications following it.

Mrs. Joseph Hebdon was the first to succumb to the dreaded disease. He death occurred shortly after noon last Sunday.

She was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Abel Smart and was born in Smithfield, Utah, June 3, 1875. … Short open air funeral services were held at the Hebdon home last Tuesday afternoon.

The second death was that of Roy Wixom, which occurred last Tuesday afternoon. His death was caused from pneumonia following the influenza. Deceased was 27 years of age and was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Joe Wixom of Sharon. He is survived by his parents, wife and three children. Funeral services were held at his home Monday afternoon.

The third home to be darkened by the shadow of death was that of Ernest P. Hoff, the young wife and mother being called at 11 o’clock Wednesday night after an illness of ten days with the flu.

The deceased was the daughter of Chris Sorensen of Georgetown, where she was born on Sept. 8, 1893. … Besides her husband and infant son, Ernest P. Jr., 17 months old, she is survived by her father, five brothers and five sister. Open air funeral services where held at the Hoff home yesterday afternoon at 3 o’clock.

The three deaths have cast a deep gloom over Georgetown, and the deepest sympathy of the entire community goes out to the grief-stricken families.

source: Montpelier Examiner. (Montpelier, Idaho), 30 Jan. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Montpelier Examiner. January 30, 1920, Page 2

Says Influenza is Unconquered

London — Official admission that the most mysterious disease germ of the ages – the influenza bacillus – has defeated the world’s greatest scientists was made to Universal Service Saturday by Sir George Newman, chief medical officer of the British health ministry.

(ibid, page 2)
— — — —

Montpelier Examiner. January 30, 1920, Page 4

19200130ME3Flu Situation In City Well In Hand

Montpelier, in common with almost every other community in the country, is again battling with the influenza. The disease made its appearance here last week, and while it quickly spread the cases, with a very few exceptions, have been in a mild form. Up to this morning there has been only one death.

There has been no inclination upon the health authorities to close the schools, picture shows or dances, as the experience of a year ago proved that the strictest of quarantines did no good. However, strict quarantine is placed upon each home where the disease appears.

The situation is being well handled by the doctors, the Red Cross and a committee from the Boosters’ club headed by A. E. Thiel.

John Hillier and Frank Dunn have been appointed quarantine officers, and headquarters have been established at the fire station. If any one who is ill with the disease need assistance of any kind, will phone 141, or get word to Mr. Hillier they will receive prompt attention.

Through action of the Boosters’ club, Chairman Howell of the county commissioners, has appointed Nettie Hillier as city nurse. She is going from house to house investigating conditions and giving such instructions to the nurses and patients as may be needed.

This morning about 45 homes under quarantine and all the patients are reported as getting along nicely.

There is no need of undue alarm over the situation and the people should not become panicky or frightened, as that would only make matters worse. Fear weakens a person’s power of resistance and makes them even more liable to contract any disease than if they went about their daily labors with confidence and a feeling that there was no such a disease as influenza in the land.
— —

Death Claims Three Star Valley People

Vernon, son of Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Crook of Afton, died in Salt Lake on Jan. 20. Death resulted from injuries received two years ago while the young man was branding and dehorning cattle. Deceased was 28 years of age. The remains were brot [sic] to Afton for burial.

Della, the four-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Adolphus Call, died in Afton on January 21. Death was caused from pneumonia.

L. F. Draney died at his home in Freedom on January 21. His death was directly due to hemorrhage of the lungs, he having bled most of the night previous to his death.
— —

No Great Act of Heroism Required

If some great act of heroism was necessary to protect a child from croup, no mother would hesitate to protect her offspring, but when it is only necessary to keep at hand a bottle of Chamberlain’s cough Remedy and give is as soon as the first indication of croup appears, there are many who neglect it. Chamberlain’s Cough Remedy is within the reach of all and is prompt and effectual. – Adv.

(ibid, page 4)
— — — — — — — — — —

Waha General Store, Waha, Idaho ca. 1909

Waha1909Fritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. January 30, 1920, Page 1

19200130CT1

19200130CT2
Launch Drive To Fight Influenza
Red Cross Takes Over Palace Rooms For Patients

Thursday afternoon the local Red Cross chapter took over the Palace rooms to provide hospital quarters for influenza patients. Because of the rapid spread of the disease both in Caldwell and in the surrounding country districts, it was deemed essential to provide hospital quarters somewhere that the patients might be given prompt medical attention.

Patrons of the hotel were asked to vacate the premises Thursday afternoon that all available room might be utilized for influenza sufferers. A number of cases were immediately quartered there.

So far, while the influenza is quite prevalent, most of the cases are of a quite mild form and no alarm is felt regarding the situation. Some few cases of pneumonia of varying degrees of severity are reported but in general the situation is considered well in hand.

Because of the contagious character of the disease it is not regarded as advisable to use regular hospitals for such patients.

source: The Caldwell Tribune. (Caldwell, Idaho), 30 Jan. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. January 30, 1920, Page 3

Local and Personal

Ten Davis schools have been closed because of influenza. Schools at Star have also been closed.

Prof. H. H. Hayman of the College of Idaho faculty is ill with the influenza. Mrs. J. M. Rankin is also sick with the same disease.

Mrs. Harry Froman and little son Bobby are confined to their home on Cleveland boulevard with influenza.

William March, city night watchman, is confined to his home because of illness. During the absence of Mr. March, Glen McCullough has been acting as night watchman.

Mrs., John Smeed is ill at her home.

R. A. Thornton of the Alexander Clothing company, is confined to his home because of illness.

Tom Reddock, proprietor of the Independent Barber shop, is seriously ill at his home.

Several persons at the court house have been ill the past week. L. C. Knowlton, county recorder, Miss Rose Edwards, chief clerk and B. L. Newell are among those who were absent from duty during the week.

(ibid, page 3)
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. January 30, 1920, Page 8

19200130CT3
Influenza Has Many Victims
State Department Urges Case But Holds Optimistic View

Influenza continues to invade new areas in the state, but the situation as a whole is somewhat improved. A total of 221 new cases with two deaths have been reported to this office January 25th, as compared with a total of 325 cases January 24th. In those communities in which all organizations are co-operating with the local health authorities the situation is well in hand.

The department of public welfare urges that the communities not become alarmed, but calmly view the situation, assist the local health officers by refraining from attending public gatherings, moving picture shows, dance halls, etc., as the foremost authorities on public health agree that these places are breeding spots for the transmission of the contagion.

Means to Prevent Spread

For the protection of those members of the family who have not influenza when an inmate of their house hold is down, it is essential that all dishes and table ware be boiled. Here again the foremost medical men agree is the second chief avenue of the contagion. Keep the home properly ventilated and when coughing or sneezing be sure to cover the mouse and nose with a handkerchief. This is called droplet infection” and the foremost medical men recognize it as an important avenue for the transmission of contagion.

The following is a report of cases received January 25th.

19200130CT4Bear Lake county, 66 new cases, 1 death.
Pocatello, 2 new cases.
Nampa, 57 new cases, 1 death.
Moscow, 41 new cases.
Minidoka, 55 new cases.
Total new cases reported, 221, two deaths.
Total cases reported since January 8th, 1444.
Total deaths, influenza, since January 8th, 3.
Total deaths, pneumonia, since January 8th, 5.

Yours truly,
Department of Public Welfare
Ernest E. Laubaugh, M. D., Chief Bureau of Public Health Service.
— —

College Of Idaho Notes

Sidney McLaughlin left for home on account of his brother Marvin, who is ill at Ten Davis.

Harley Philpott of Boise returned to college after a week’s absence caused by his parents’ sickness.

Raymond Rice of Roswell is ill.

The joy killer of the campus begins next Wednesday when final examinations are scheduled.

(ibid, page 8)
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. January 30, 1920, Page 9

Items of Interest From Surrounding Territory

Ten Davis

There is no school this week on account of the sickness in the neighborhood. It is hoped that by Monday it will be possible to have school again.

La Verne Miller came home from Boise Friday evening sick with the influenza. Winston Miller came down with it Sunday morning. They are getting along as well as can be expected.

Carol Gahley has the influenza. She came home from Boise Thursday evening.

Marvin McLaughlin is still unable to be around yet.

Little Ruth Bartles is ill with the pneumonia.

George McNichol is slowly improving from the influenza.

Mrs. L. E. Small has been sick the past week.

There were not many people at church Sunday.

The water in Sand Hollow raised Sunday night and has washed the bridge out near Ten Davis and made the one by McLaughlin unsafe for large cars to cross on.

The mail man was unable to make the trip through here Monday on account of the bridges being out.

Marble Front

W. B. Allicon is confined to his home with influenza. This is the first case in our community.

Miss Edith Clements primary teacher was unable to be in school Monday and Tuesday because of illness. Mr. Bertra Horner substituted during her absence.

Mr. Iva Vassar and son Sammie are confined to their home with a severe attack of grippe.

The S. J. Livesay family are recovering from the grippe.

A. B. Knott is confined to his home with a severe cold.

Helen Packer and Theodore Wells are still unable to return to school. Helen has been tussling with scarlet fever.

Robert, the young son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Milliner is recovering from a sick spell.

The many friends of Bart Thomas will be sorry to learn of his critical illness. Bart was formerly a resident of this community but now resides in Caldwell.

Word has been received from J. T. Bales who is visiting at Leesburg, Va., that he is a victim of the influenza.

(ibid, page 9)
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. January 30, 1920, Page 10

Items of Interest From Surrounding Territory

Greenleaf Snaps

Mrs. Seburn Harris is at Melba caring for daughter and son, who are sick with the influenza.

The Ambrose Tish family is sick with the influenza.

Ezra Hinshaw is on the sick list.

Mr. Calvin Harvey is quite sick.

John Ragsdale is on the sick list.

Eugene Hibbs has recovered from the mumps and is back to school in the seminary.

Glen Gulley is sick with the mumps.

Sunny Slope

Quite a lot of sickness seems to have appeared among our residents.

Mrs. Cupp’s family have all been ailing with the grippe and the mumps. Maurice Bailey and Annie Roberts have the influenza, while Hubert Smith is said to have the small pox.

The entire community was greatly shocked to learn of the death of Mrs. Harry E. Smith which occurred at Boise last Thursday morning. Friends knew that both Mr. and Mrs. Smith were ill in a Boise hotel, but no one was prepared for Mrs. Smith’s sudden demise, which was caused by the pneumonia. She leaves her husband, a son, a mother, and two sisters to mourn her loss. Interment was in a Boise cemetery.

(ibid, page 10)
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. January 30, 1920, Page 11

Items of Interest From Surrounding Territory

Fair Acre

Mr. and Mrs. Denman and two children are having a siege of the influenza. They are all very sick.

Midway News

Elon Williams is seriously ill with the mumps.

John M. Nicholas has been on the sick list for the past week with a severe cold.

Brier Rose

Leroy Shaw is having a tussle with lagrippe this week.

Mrs. H. E. Smith was threatened with pneumonia last week, but is some better at this time.

Little Sterling Brown, and Jessie Spencer, who were out of school last week on account of colds, are better and in school again.

Robert Christopher is ill with indigestion. Has has not been able to attend school this week.

As the writer is sick abed this whole budget of news savors of sickness.

Last but not least, at the Bill Postlewaite home they seem to be running quite a hospital as there are six patients up to this date, all confined to their beds.

Canyon

La Grippe is very prevalent in Canyon. The school become so depleted that the board of education decided on Tuesday to close for a short time. Some entire families have been stricken down.

R. A. Houdyshell and family are improving slowly. Dr. Hamer was called to treat the entire family of S. P. McNeil.

Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Suread were visiting at the home of Dr. B. Nyers on Sunday and reported la grippe in their home in Boise.

Dr. and Mrs. A. J. Cox from Middleton have been assisting in the care of their daughter, Mrs. Houdyshell and her family in their illness.

Pleasant Ridge

The small child of Mr. and Mrs. Wyrick who has been having a tussle with the influenza is reported as being much improved.

Miss Lamson teacher in the lower room is ill with the scarlet fever. Her mother is here from Colorado taking care of her. Miss Daisy Beatty of Caldwell is substituting as teacher during Miss Lamson’s absence.

The higher grades of the school were dismissed several days last week as several of the pupils in the eighth grade were taking examinations.

Maple Grove

Clinton Northroup is slowly improving after a siege of pneumonia.

Miss Doris Chambers is up again after a week sickness.

Bruce Smith is the third patient down with pneumonia in our neighborhood.

Sylvester Hills family are quarantined for small pox. Dr. Gue was called Thursday night to see Jessie and pronounced it such.

Claytonia

We understand that the influenza is on the war path again very strongly in the Gem district. Three families near the Claytonia school have it. Mr. and Mrs. Tom Jackson and one daughter have it. Bill Jackson is down. Bessie Wilson has it and Mrs. Hansbrough was taken to the hospital last Saturday with an undecided case which may turn out to be influenza.

The schools have been closed but what is the use of closing the schools if the young people are allowed to run around to parties.

Mrs. Harry Smith died at the hospital in Caldwell last Thursday due to pneumonia caused by the influenza. She was buried on Friday.

Grandma Andrews is recovering slowly from a severe attack of cold.

Two men were taken sick at a sheep camp at Mrs. Andrew’s place and were taken to Caldwell. We have not learned if it was the influenza.

A sad accident happened at the Froman ferry not long ago when Dr. Young of Caldwell was drowned. He leaves a wife and four children.

(ibid, page 11)
— — — — — — — — — —

Shoshone Journal. January 30, 1920, Page 1

19200130SJ1

19200130SJ2
Official Report On The Flu Situation

Boise, Idaho, Jan. 27th, 1920

Influenza continues to increase throughout Idaho, four hundred and fifty new cases being reported to this office January 26th.

Thus far there has been no evidence of any material increase in the severity of the disease, but three deaths being reported during the past twenty-four hours.

No accurate statistics are available on Pneumonia but it appears that Pneumonia is becoming prevalent.

Influenza Reported 1-26-20

Ada County – Boise 33, Kuna 40, Star 82.
Bannock County – Pocatello 4.
Bear Lake County – Montpelier 100.
Benewah County – 8.
Canyon County – Nampa 60[?], Parma 3.
Fremont County – Ashton 1.
Jerome County – Jerome 1.
Kootenai County – Culdesac 15, Rose Lake 2.
Madison County – 18.
Minidoka County – 29.
Lewis County – Ilo 2.
Nez Perce County – Lewiston, 32.
Payette County – New Plymouth 2, Payette 1.
Shoshone County – Wallace 6.
Twin Falls County – Twin Falls 5.
Death from influenza, Pocatello 1.
Death from pneumonia, Star 2.

Ernest E. Laughbaugh, M. D., Chief Bureau of Public Health Service.
— —

High School Notes

There has been so much absence on the part of both pupils and teachers that we are beginning to think the flu must be around again. Miss Farris, Miss Elenor Jones and Mrs. Johnson were absent Monday, Miss Hollingshead and Miss Henkins on Tues. During the absence of Mrs. Johnson Monday and Miss Henkins Tuesday, Flossie Mason has been teaching.

Mary McMahon was taken ill Mon. and had to return home from school.

source: Shoshone Journal. (Shoshone, Idaho), 30 Jan. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

American Falls Press. January 30, 1920, Page 1

19200130AFP1

19200130AFP2Spread Of Influenza Source Of Concern
Ernest Laubaugh Reports Many New Cases But Few Casualties – Urges Cooperation of Public to Confine Cases to Afflicted Localities

Influenza continues to invade new areas in the state, but the situation as a whole is somewhat improved. A total of two hundred and twenty-one new cases with two deaths having been reported to this office January 25th, as compared with a total of three hundred and twenty-five cases on January 24th. In those communities in which all organizations are cooperating with the local health authorities the situation is well in hand.

This office urges that the communities not become alarmed, but calmly view the situation, assist the local health officers by refraining from attending public gatherings, moving picture shows, dance halls, etc., as the foremost authorities on public health agree that these places are breeding spots for the transmission of the contagion.

For the protection of these members of the family who have no “flu’ when an inmate of their household is down, it is essential that all dishes and table … (Continued on page 5.)
— —

Women’s Club Urges Campsite and Parent Teachers Association
Revives Activity After Suspension Of Two Years – Mrs. C. W. Thompson Chosen President, Mrs. Voight Vice Pres.
Meetings Held Bi-Monthly
Mayor Hanson, Dr. Schlitz and Dr. Noth Give Survey of Civic and Health Conditions of Town and County

Election of officers and a survey of the civic needs of the city were the outstanding features of the first meeting of the American Falls Woman’s club since the outbreak of the war in 1917. Mrs. C. W. Thompson was elected president; Mrs. John P. Voight, vice president, and Mrs. R. E. Austin, secretary-treasurer. The meeting was held in the parlor of the Hotel Remington and was attended by 25 women of the city.

Mayor Hanson, Dr. C. F. Schiltz, president of the Chamber of Commerce and Dr. R. F. Noth, county health officer spoke before the club on the civic needs of the town. Mayor Hanson explained the needs of a campsite and the possibilities of obtaining same through the action of the city council. He believed that the financial support should come from the Chamber of Commerce and expressed reluctance on the part of the council to pay the preliminary costs out of the public funds. He intimated that the city would be glad to maintain any campsite chosen and assist in every way possible to bring about the creation of all necessary accommodations for tourists.

Dr. Schlitz urged the cooperation of the Woman’s club in civic affairs and suggested to the women that they exert [their] influence on the members of the [city] council to the end that the city [build?] the necessary improvements for the campsite. He expressed appreciation of the proposed work to be undertaken by the club. “If the Chamber of Commerce and the American Falls Woman’s club say that the city should build the campsite and maintain it, I believe that the council will see that it is done,” he said. Mr. Hanson stated that the undivided support of these two bodies would undoubtedly encourage the council in any undertaking of the sort mentioned.

19200130AFP3No “Flu” in County.

Dr. Noth advised the women that there was not a single case of real influenza in the county. There is considerable illness and many have severe colds bordering on influenza. Local afflictions however, he said, apply to the head and do not include afflictions of the lungs or other vital organs of the body. He advised teachers to watch for the appearance of sickness in the school room and report immediately any symptoms that appear. Persons afflicted with severe colds bordering on influenza should remain at home and prevent possible contagion.

Mrs. Bruce Lampson held the interest of her audience with a few timely suggestions on the value to be realized from a parent-teachers’ association. “Two few parents cooperate with teachers to get the best results from the education of their children,” she said. “A better understanding and acquaintance among parents and teachers will make our school problems much easier and encourage more congenial relationship that will bring improved benefits to our students.”

… The next meeting of the club will be held Wednesday afternoon at 3 o’clock in the parlor of the Remington. There will be a musical program in addition to the regular business. All women of the town are urged to be present as well as all from out of town who are able to attend. Meetings will be held on the first and third Wednesdays of the month. Teachers are particularly invited to join as honorary members.

source: American Falls Press. (American Falls, Idaho), 30 Jan. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Wallace, Idaho, Looking West ca. 1914

Wallace1914Fritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

January 31

The Daily Star-Mirror., January 31, 1920, Page 1

19200131DSM1

19200131DSM2
“Flu” Situation Much Better Today
No More Deaths In Moscow And Fewer Cases – Troy Man Is Flu Victim

Local conditions show marked improvement in regards to the influenza epidemic. It is reported that there were but 28 new cases reported yesterday as compared with an average of 48 for the previous four days. The new cases are generally mild. A number of those who were first taken ill are being released from quarantine. Many of the cases are so mild that the patients do not even go to bed but remain in doors and take care of themselves.

Troy Man is Dead

Samuel Sletto, of Troy, died of pneumonia following influenza last night. He had been sick but a few days. He leaves a wife and four children. His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ole Sletto, of Moscow, are under quarantine with the disease as is his sister, Mrs. J. Wilson.

No Deaths in Moscow

Contrary to persistent reports via the street rumor route, there have been no more deaths in Moscow and general conditions are regarded as much better. The warm, bright sunshine is regarded as much better for health conditions than the cloudy, damp and chilly weather of a week ago. The past two days have been more like April than January and this is believed to have helped conditions locally.

Two Deaths at Lewiston

Two more deaths are reported at Lewiston yesterday, making a total of 12, to date, but conditions are reported much better in Lewiston than they have been and it is believed the crest of the wave has passed there as in many other places. Camas Prairie towns report conditions much improved today.

Much Worse in New York

New York — Deaths from influenza and pneumonia showed another increase in the reports submitted to the health department today, while the number of new cases of each disease again jumped nearly to record figures. There were 119 influenza and 143 pneumonia deaths reported today, and increase of 19 and 7 respectively over those reported yesterday. New influenza cases reported reached a total of 5,532, an increase of 825 over yesterday and within 57 of the record number reported Wednesday. New pneumonia cases totaled 851, and increase of 202 over the previous day.

Chicago Stops Public Funerals

Chicago — New cases of influenza for the last 24 hours numbered 1,015 as against 1,149 on Thursday, while pneumonia claimed 340 new patients, compared with 455. Deaths from influenza totaled 112 and from pneumonia 80.

A ban was placed on public funerals and on wakes, and persons attending funerals are limited to ten, by order of the health department tonight.

Increase at Spokane

Spokane — One hundred and ninety-five cases of influenza with no deaths were reported here tonight, bringing the total cases to 500, practically all of a mild nature.

U. of Minnesota Student Deaths

Minneapolis — Eight students at the University of Minnesota died of influenza today. One hundred and fifty students at the school are ill. There are 2,000 cases in Minneapolis.

Deaths at Honolulu

Honolulu, T. H. — Three deaths from influenza were reported here today, making twelve fatalities here from the disease since Jan. 1. Sixty-four cases have been reported during that time.

The situation on the island of Maui, second largest of the Hawaiian group, was declared out of hand today and the territorial health doctor has been dispatched to the place. Two deaths have occurred in Maui and 26 cases have been reported to date.
— —

No Services at Nazarene Church

Owing to the influenza situation and the fact that Pastor Goss and wife have been assisting to care for the sick, there will be no services tomorrow at the Nazarene Church.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 31 Jan. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., January 31, 1920, Page 5

City News

The sheriff’s office has had several of its officers absent on account of influenza. Sheriff Woody and his family have just been released from quarantine and Deputy Sheriff L. G. Peterson is now a victim of the disease, but he is recovering rapidly.

Clinton Havens is quite ill of the influenza.

(ibid, page 5)
————-

Further Reading

The Spanish Flu in Spokane

By Kenneth Knoll 2/07/2005 HistoryLink.org Essay 7247

Kenneth Knoll was 12 years old when the influenza epidemic came to Spokane. This catastrophic event so impressed him that he felt compelled to describe it 70 years later. His essay is based mainly on newspaper accounts, official records and personal recollections and is reprinted from The Pacific Northwesterner, Vol. 33, No. 1, 1989. It is here edited by David Wilma and reprinted by permission of the publisher.

1918SpokaneYoungMasks-aKenneth Knoll (c.) and his sisters wearing gauze masks against influenza, Spokane, 1918 Courtesy Kenneth Knoll, The Pacific Northwesterner

When the Plague Hit Spokane

By Kenneth Knoll

By October 1918, the faltering Allied forces had regrouped to stem the advance of the German Army. After great human sacrifice, the tide was changing in war-ravaged Europe. Young men from Spokane were among those who had been killed or wounded in the fighting. The list of casualties in the Spokesman-Review served as a constant reminder of the toll of war.

Underlying these concerns was another dread. The Spanish Influenza which had been sweeping Europe with severe and fatal effects had leaped the Atlantic Ocean and was now present on the East Coast. The first case of the flu had been reported in Boston on September 5. On October 1, the City Health Department declared that some cases might be in Spokane but saw no need for alarm. The Department recommended covering the mouth and nose while sneezing and using antiseptic sprays and gargles to prevent infection.

As the days passed, newspapers reported a virtual explosion in the number of cases as the disease relentlessly spread across the nation. On the Atlantic Coast, the highest incidence of illness occurred in crowded army cantonments. By October 1, 72,327 cases were reported in Army camps, 20,000 of them occurring in the previous 48 hours. By October 3, there were more than 100,000 cases with over 2,000 deaths in members of the Armed Forces. By the next day, the total number of cases stood at 137,975.

Similar phenomenon was occurring in the civilian population. On October 1, Boston reported 171 deaths from influenza. Philadelphia had 446 new cases and Helena, Montana, 100. By October 3, cases had been reported in 42 states.

The University of Washington in Seattle reported 820 cases among its students on October 4, with one death. On October 5, Chicago had 916 new cases and 78 deaths. Philadelphia had 788 cases and 171 deaths. Officials in Washington, D.C., closed all places of public assembly such as churches, theaters, and dance halls. Seattle did the same and police declared that spitting in the streets would be cause for arrest. By October 7, Washington state was added to the list of states having influenza in epidemic proportions.

The causes and means of transmission of the disease were poorly understood in the early 1900s and as a result, the methods proposed for prevention were often bizarre. Dr. John B. Anderson, Spokane Health Officer, pointed out in the Spokesman-Review for October 10, 1918, that the methods used to fight pestilence in medieval times, such as public bonfires, the burning of mixtures of spices or of salt or vinegar sprinkled on flames were useless. Eye witness accounts tell of the practice in some areas around Spokane of burning sulfur on a kitchen range to protect those entering the home of a flu sufferer. Physicians in the community recommended living in the open, avoiding crowds, ingesting large quantities of water and avoiding fatigue as the best available preventive measures. One City Health Officer stated that the use of aspirin and phenacetin for analgesia was dangerous but that some of the digitalis group would be helpful in sustaining the heart during the illness. Gauze masks were recommended for use by the healthy to prevent exposure to the infection but the protection they afforded was questionable.

Today, we know that Influenza is caused by two types of viruses, that it primarily involves the nose, throat, and bronchial tree, and that it can extend into the lungs in the form of pneumonia, at which time a bacterial infection may be superimposed. What first presents as a simple illness with fever and chills and malaise can progress rapidly to a state in which the patient has shortness of breath, heart failure, and circulatory collapse leading to death. During the flu epidemic of 1918, the infectious agent was particularly virulent, placing the patient in desperate straits. This was particularly true in Europe where malnutrition was prevalent.

By October 8, Dr. Anderson declared that Spokane was in the throes of the influenza epidemic, and ordered that as of midnight, all schools, theaters, places of amusement, dance halls, churches, and Sunday Schools would be closed and that conventions and other public meetings were prohibited. Schools were closed the next day and students who showed up were sent home. I remember that day very well. To us boys, it was an unexpected vacation that allowed us to play war all day long. We had converted one of our friend’s backyard into a battlefield with trenches, dug-outs and other trappings of the battlefield. Clods of dirt made very good hand grenades and we got pretty good at lobbing them at each other.

Department stores were forbidden to have special sales as these would draw crowds. Rules regarding ventilation, sanitation, and spitting were strictly enforced. Jury trials were stopped and the Spokane Stock Exchange was closed.

The ban on public meetings brought some unforeseen results. The rule included funerals and weddings. One man’s funeral was scheduled for October 11. His wife hired a brass band to play at the service but was told that attendance would have to be limited. By arrangement with the City Health Officer, the services were held in the Gonzaga Chapel with only six mourners and six pallbearers present. The brass band and a large gathering of friends stayed outside in the open air.

A minister asked the City Health Department to determine if a wedding with 30 guests would be considered a public gathering. He was told that it was, and therefore, the wedding could not be held. The bride solved the problem by reducing the guest list and got married anyhow.

A clairvoyant was arrested for holding a séance for spirit-rapping. She claimed that it was not a public meeting but rather a gathering of friends. Her plea was of no avail and she was jailed. The proprietor of the Pastime Pool Room was arrested for continuing to hold card games. Then there was the case of the owner of a soft drink establishment who was arrested for having too large a crowd in his place. He weighed 350 pounds. When the police officers tried to put him into the patrol wagon, they discovered the door was too narrow for him to pass through, so to add to his indignity, he had to walk behind the paddy wagon to the station.

Bowling alleys were closed on October 11. As a result, toy and game departments of stores were flourishing as people looked for entertainment at home. Some theater managers made use of the closure of their establishments to redecorate the interiors. Two theater musicians, now without jobs, used the time to get married.

On October 14, Spokane experienced 59 new cases and three deaths. The City Council discussed the need for a public hospital for flu cases. A rapid solution consisted of using a downtown hotel for this purpose.

The municipal hospital for influenza patients opened at noon on October 17. It replaced the Lion Hotel at 1121/2 South Lincoln. Miss Ethel Butts of the Deaconess Hospital nursing staff was the hospital manager. The hotel furnished heat, linens, and maintenance.

The First Church of Christ Scientist asked the Health Department for permission to resume church services in the belief that their meetings would be effective in preventing the epidemic. Dr. Anderson replied that he could not waive the rules against indoor assemblies for one group only.

On October 30, the Red Cross summoned the women of Spokane to a sewing bee at the Old National Bank Building to sew flu masks for the Army Training Corps at Moscow, Idaho. The masks were made of six plies of surgical gauze, six by eight inches in size, gathered slightly at the narrow end with strings attached at each corner to tie around the head and neck.

By morning of October 22, the epidemic appeared to be lessening, but by the following day, there were 209 new cases and a total death toll of 35. Among these was a young woman who had given birth to a baby girl five days earlier. Her husband followed her in death the next day.

The sense of fear and helplessness bred by the situation led to feelings of anger and frustration. As part of the war effort, restaurants were required to conserve fats, and were limited to serving one pat of butter, weighing no more than half an ounce, to each customer. One jeweler in Spokane believed that the pat of butter he received was less than the allowed amount. When he could not get his grievance satisfied by his waiter, he announced that the next time he came for lunch, he was bringing his jeweler’s balance with him and his pat of butter better be a full half ounce.

Drug stores reported sales of large amounts of gargles, germicides, and inhalers. The clerks at the Exchange National Bank started wearing flu masks on the job. The bank president was already wearing his.

The Spokesman-Review for October 27 carried a large advertisement by the Davenport Hotel stressing the freshness of the air in the hotel. The public was told that the air was taken from above street level and then passed through “marvelous devices” to warm and humidify it. Two days later, the Kemp and Herbert Department Stores ran a similar advertisement saying that there was a constant change of air on every floor. Flu masks were now being worn by store clerks, messenger boys, and paper boys.

Seven people died in Spokane on October 28. There were 300 new cases and the flu hospital was filled to capacity. On November 3, the State Board of Health ordered that flu masks be worn throughout the state in all public conveyances, corridors, lobbies, and other public buildings. Stores were ordered to keep their doors wide open. The next day, the Superior Court closed for three weeks in response to the epidemic.

At midnight, November 10, 1918, the Armistice agreement was signed, ending World War I. This was an occasion for much celebration. Dr. Anderson said that if there was no marked increase in flu cases after the crowded celebrations, he would feel that the danger was past. At this time, the State Board of Health withdrew the mask regulation and stated that the quarantine might be lifted the following Sunday, after which theaters, schools, and churches could open.

On November 14, one Spokane citizen urged that the officials release confiscated whiskey to the flu sufferers to help their recovery. The Volstead Act prohibiting the sale of alcoholic beverages had become law on October 28. On November 15, the Judge of the Superior Court ruled that the whiskey could not be released, so the flu victims had to suffer soberly.

Spokane Public schools opened on November 25, but the Superintendent warned that one sneeze and the pupil would be sent home. If any member of a family had the flu, none of the children in that family were permitted to attend school.

On November 30, there was a dramatic rise in the number of flu cases 242 new ones; the next day there were 250. On December 2, several churches held memorial services for the victims and there were 603 new cases with 118 in the municipal hospital. Twenty-nine percent of the students were absent from school that day, and at an emergency meeting, the School Board asked the Health Department to close the schools again. The next day, the schools were closed indefinitely.

By December 5, 300,000 to 350,000 people had died in the United States since September 15. Walla Walla and Yakima reported that their hospitals were full of flu patients. In Spokane, the Health Department re-instituted a modified flu ban. Theaters were required to close and air out between 5 and 7 p.m. and to use only alternate rows of seats. Churches were allowed to have services only if they used alternate row seating and did not allow singing. Street cars could carry only as many passengers as could be seated. All homes with flu patients posted warning placards.

By December 13, the total reported cases in the city stood at 10,024. Western Union Life Insurance Company reported policy sales had doubled since the start of the epidemic and that their losses had increased. The total paid by Spokane County for widows’ pensions was the largest in its history. The disease reached its peak on the week ending December 7, with 2,210 cases and 52 deaths. The next week the number of cases was half that but the number of deaths was 76. By December 19, there were only 32 patients in the flu hospital and two deaths that day. Yakima reported that for the first time in six weeks, a day had passed without a death from the flu. The City Health Department ruled that Christmas church services could be held but would not allow any congregational singing.

On December 22, there were no deaths and only 23 patients in the flu hospital. On December 24, the patient count was down to 16. Dr. Anderson said that restrictions would be lifted after the first of the year and that theaters having modern systems of ventilation would be the first to be allowed to open.

Christmas arrived on this hopeful note. On December 31, the papers announced that schools would reopen on January 2 and that churches and theaters could also reopen. Dance halls had to stay closed. The two Spokane high schools reported only 10 to 15 percent absenteeism, although grade schools showed 30 to 50 percent absent. To recover lost time, school hours were lengthened.

Life was starting to return to normal. On January 13, 1919, the flu hospital closed its doors. It had been open for 89 days and had cared for 617 patients, 68 of whom had died. Miss Ethel Butts was in charge the entire time, and she served without pay.

During the epidemic, the four visiting nurses of the Social Service Bureau were of great help. Many times they found entire families ill with no one to take care of them. The nurses carried a supply of broth with them for those who were unable to prepare their own food. Physicians who had not been called into military service had provided care and reassurance to the multitude of patients whom they had visited day and night at their homes and at the hospital. Morticians worked overtime to remove the dead and maintain burial services.

The incidence of illness gradually tapered off and after the middle of January, news items regarding the epidemic dropped from 12 or more column inches a day to one or two. On January 23, 12 cases were reported, with no deaths. Except for a brief resurgence during the first three months of 1920, the epidemic was over. For the entire period in Spokane, out of a total of 16,985 patients with influenza and its complications, 1,045 had succumbed. Compared to many other cities, Spokane had suffered lightly.

The citizenry reacted well toward the problems produced by the epidemic even though this was a period disrupted by the demands of an all out war in Europe and the adjustments needed for the establishment of peace. The annual report of the City Health Department for 1918 makes special mention of how the people rallied with volunteer efforts to relieve suffering, by transporting and assisting stricken families and aiding doctors and nurses in their labors, particularly at the influenza hospital.

Farmers in the surrounding areas freely donated food supplies such as eggs and milk; stores donated fruit and vegetables to the hospital; the city and county governments furnished money and supplies to the needy. A sense of personal responsibility for helping in an emergency was evident.

Today there is little by which to remember the event. There are few who can recall it. The hotel which housed the flu hospital has been torn down and the site is now a downtown motel. The only remaining physical evidences of the Influenza Epidemic of 1918 are the newspaper reports, the official health records and some tombstones in the cemeteries.

source: The Pacific Northwesterner, Vol. 33, No. 1, 1989.
This essay is licensed under a Creative Commons license that encourages reproduction with attribution.
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Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 1)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 2)
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Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 11)
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Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 19)
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Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 21)
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Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 27)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 28)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 29)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 30)
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Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 33)
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Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 35)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 36)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 37)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 38)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 39)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 40)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 41)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 42)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 43)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 44)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 45)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 46)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 47)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 48)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 49)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 50)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 51)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 52)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 53)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 54)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 55)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 56)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 57)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 58)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 59)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 60)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 61)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 62)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 63)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 64)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 65)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 66)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 67)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 68)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 69)

Idaho History Aug 22, 2021

Idaho 1918-1920 Influenza Pandemic

Part 69

Idaho Newspaper clippings January 29-30, 1920

Idaho photos courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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January 29

The Grangeville Globe. January 29, 1920, Page 1

19200129GG1

19200129GG2“Flu” Epidemic Conditions Not Serious; Invades Many Families
Board of Health Adopt Strict Quarantine Regulations to Assist in Avoiding Spread of Disease; Public Places Closed

The presence of a number of cases Grangeville the first of the week prompted the necessity of formulating and meeting the emergency of an epidemic, and acting on instructions received from the state board of health Mayor Campbell called a meeting of the board of health of the City of Grangeville, consisting of Dr. B. Chipman, chairman, and councilmen Lingo and Riutcel, to meet with the physicians of Grangeville, on Tuesday evening. The county superintendent, Superintendent Lukens, and Mrs. B. Lanningham representing the local chapter of the Red Cross were present.

The sentiment of all who were present, including local physicians, was that prompt and strict measures be taken to prevent the epidemic from becoming serious. And as a first precaution Dr. Chipman stated that a quarantine of all reported cases in the city would be had, and requested the doctors to report all cases and at the same time he procured a statement of absences from school with a view of investigating cases in the city where no physician had been called. It was determined to close all public schools, but no steps were planned at the meeting, this matter being left open.

Tuesday hand bills were ordered printed and placards made for posting asking the people of the city to cooperate with the board of health in getting control and stamping out the flu. It was asked that every one move along and tend strictly to their business, not to gather in public places, stay at home, and to report all cases as soon as possible to Dr. Chipman and above all to observe the quarantine when families were quarantined.

The increasing number of children absent from school either by reason of being ill or on account of being taken out of school by parents to prevent exposure to the disease, made it advisable in the opinion of Superintendent Lukens and the members of the school board to close the schools.

Wednesday evening the board of health acting on the advice of Dr. Chipman, requested that the mayor order all places of public amusement and gatherings to suspend until further order, and the picture show was closed, and pool hall proprietors were instructed to cover tables, remove chairs and prevent loafing in their places of business. The hotels were also instructed to keep their lobbies clear and cards were printed and put up in all business places requesting people to move along. These regulations and rules imposed by the board of health will be strictly enforced, and violators will be prosecuted if the necessity should arise.

Local business men all expressed willingness to cooperate heartily with the board of health to enforce the rules against congregating and loafing and to keep the crowd moving until the situation should be relieved. Another police officer was put on to assist in enforcing the regulations and minors will not under any circumstances be permitted to be on the streets or in business places, except on good excuse, and will be expected to stay at home during the continuance of the present regulations. The officers are instructed to enforce this provision strictly.

Although there are a number of cases in the city, only a few have been reported serious. However it was thought best to take steps to prevent the spread of the epidemic and get it under control and not to wait until conditions got so bad that there would be small chance of handling the situation. Hearty cooperation of everyone will make the task more pleasant for the board of health and city officials and will assist in cutting down the number of cases so that the epidemic will soon pass and ordinary business be resumed.

The state department of public welfare is kept busy sending out literature regarding the influenza, with statement of the condition, new prevalent over the state, and giving advice in connection therewith. Among them is the following:

“This office urges that the communities not become alarmed, but calmly view the situation, assist the local health officers by refraining from attending gatherings of any kind whatsoever, as the foremost authorities on public health agree that places of public gatherings are breeding spots for the transmission of the contagion.

“For the protection of those members of the family who have not contracted the “Flu,” when an inmate of their household is down, it is essential that all dishes and tableware be boiled before being used or placed in contact with other dishes, etc. Here again the foremost medical men agree is the chief avenue of the contagion. Keep the home properly ventilated and when coughing or sneezing be sure to cover the mouth and nose with a handkerchief. This is called “droplet infection” and medical men recognize it as an important avenue for the transmission of the contagion.”

Opinions of Physicians

From the daily press we glean the following expressions from well known physicians:

“All attempts by army physicians to determine last year how influenza is communicated were unavailing.”

“Atmospheric and climatic conditions bring out influenza and quarantining does not limit or confine it.”

“Persons who have the proper blood pressure do not contract the disease, and those who pressure is low do, quarantine or no quarantine.”

“There is no more use in quarantining against influenza than against mosquitoes.”

But it goes without saying that if you are ill the proper place for you is at home and not on the streets, and to overcome the disease you must stay within the home and observe the rules that have been laid down by the physicians if you expect to recover. Care and the strict observance of the physicians orders is what is needed for speedy recovery.
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Court Postponed
Regular Term for Lewis County is Deferred by Judge Scales.

The regular term of the district court for Lewis county which was set for Monday, February 2, has been postponed by Judge Wallace N. Scales. The judge had made arrangements to depart for Nezperce on Sunday but on conversing with the officers of that county it was deemed advisable to postpone the term owing to the influenza. Just when the term will be convened will depend on the subsiding of the epidemic.
— —

J. E. McPherson Dead
Well Known Pioneer Passed Away This Morning From Diabetes

John Edward McPherson, aged 57 years, 9 months and 23 days, died at the family residence in this city early this morning, the 29th, leaving the widow and five children, three boys and two girls, to mourn is taking away. The children, all of whom reside in and near Grangeville, are as follows: Howard, Marlon, Glenwood, Mrs. Minnie Chamberlain and Mrs. Zettie Chamberlain.

Funeral services will be held at the residence in the southeast part of the city at 2:30 Friday afternoon, W. N. Knox officiating, and E. S. Hancock funeral director.

Deceased was born in Missouri and came to Idaho many years ago where he engaged in farming. For the past several years he as resided in this city, having amassed a considerable fortune from his business operations. He had been a sufferer for the past five years from diabetes. He was seen on the streets early this week and contracted a slight attack of the “flu” which aggravated the disease with which he was afflicted.

source: The Grangeville Globe. (Grangeville, Idaho), 29 Jan. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Grangeville Globe. January 29, 1920, Page 7

Meeting of the County Board of Health

State of Idaho, County of Idaho, ss.

Be it known that on this Monday the 19th day of January, 1920 the County Board of Health meets in called session at the omce [sic] of the Board of County Commissioners at the Court house, in Grangeville, Idaho.

Members present, Dr. G. S. Stockton, Clerk of said board and John D. Long, President, and Dale Clark and Edward S. Vincent, members.

After discussing of matters affecting its duties the following resolution was unanimously adopted:

It appearing to the board that a demand has been received by the County Board of Health of this county from the State Board of Health, directing that steps be taken to prepare for an out break of the influenza. It is hereby ordered that all incorporated cities, towns, villages and other communities shall prepare to take care of all cases of influenza of such cities, towns, villages and communities, maintaining a strict isolation of all such cases, and that the expense of such isolation and care be a charge against each separate city, town, village or community and not against the county. It is further ordered that the county Commissioners will not be responsible for any charges made, nor pay any claims filed by physicians or quarantine officers in the care and isolation of influenza cases occurring in this county.

There being no further business the board here adjourned sine die.

John D. Long, President
Attest: Dr. G. S. Stockton, Clerk.

(ibid, page 7)
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The Grangeville Globe. January 29, 1920, Page 8

Local Happenings

Quite a number of people are absent from their usual places of business this week on account of sickness. Some have contracted the “flu” and others who have slight colds are remaining inside to administer the proper treatment and to avoid contact with the disease while in a receptive mood. A good idea.

Rehearsals of the home talent play “The Girl from France,” like all other activities of a public nature, have been temporarily halted during the prevalence of the influenza quarantine. The play was slated to be produced at an early date for the benefit of the local fire department. It is the intention of those in the case to resume rehearsals and to plan for the early production of the piece as soon as the influenza ban is lifted. Home talent plays are always a real treat in Grangeville and the forthcoming presentation has been assured the hearty support of all.
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Federated Church

To be on the safe side and help to prevent an epidemic of the influenza, there will be no services next Sunday. Let us all use every precaution.

H. S. Randall, Pastor
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19200129GG3Broth For “Flu” Patients

Mrs. Bert Lanningham, together with members of the Grangeville Red Cross, have been arrangements to prepare broth for families who are sick and are short of help, and to send this to such families on notice.
— —

Whitebird News

Although there are a few cases of “flu” in town the movie show and dance at Zerr’s hall was well attended. Several young people from Doumecq were down.

The children of the seventh grade enjoyed a party at the Thompson home Saturday night.

On the same evening the high school students surprised their classmate L. Lennons. The evening was spent playing games.

Word has been received that Mr. Nail, cashier of the bank here, is ill at the White Hospital in Lewiston. Mrs. Nail and the children are in Grangeville.

(ibid, page 8)
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Jerome County Times., January 29, 1920, Page 2

19200129JCT1

19200129JCT2Says Influenza is Unconquered

London — Official admission that the most mysterious disease germ of the ages – the influenza bacillus – has defeated the world’s greatest scientists was made to Universal Service Saturday by Sir George Newman, chief medical officer of the British health ministry.

source: Jerome County Times. (Jerome, Idaho), 29 Jan. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Emmett Index. January 29, 1920, Page 1

19200129EI1

19200129EI2
Influenza Epidemic Spreads
Few Families Escape Around Sweet – Disease Not Severe – No Fatalities So Far

The influenza epidemic in Gem county may be summed up as follows: The high point is in the Squaw creek country, where 81 cases were reported Monday. Zeke Sweet, who was in town, says only two families in that community had escaped. In other portions of the county, the disease is much less general. It is not nearly so severe in character as last year, and so far there have been no fatalities. Everywhere, there is lack of nurses and help of any kind.

In the Squaw creek country the help situation has been a serious one, entire families being sick and being compelled to take care of each other the best they can, in most cases. The good people who are not sick at Sweet and Montour have been supplying the afflicted with soup and bread.

The Bank of Emmett employees were hard hit and all at once, V. T. Craig, Misses Norwood, Marler and Gamage, all being stricken at once. When the bank opened for business Monday, Ed Hayes was behind the cashier’s window assisting Lauren Dean, and A. O. Sutton and Tillie Peterson were assisting Mrs. Dean with the bookkeeping. All the afflicted ones were reported better yesterday and will soon be back on the job again.

Billy Wilton’s real estate office opened up Tuesday morning with Col. Jim Barnard at the desk and threatening to sell everything listed at auction sale unless Bill got well p.d.q., which had the desired effect, and Bill tried to make it down town yesterday but while the spirit was willing his legs were wobbly and wouldn’t track.

The Boise Payette mill was hit hard and many of its employees have been off duty. Bob Burlingame has been working night and day, three of his assistants being sick. One of the mill houses has been turned into a hospital, where men without families are being cared for.

In the city and the country districts the help proposition is as serious as in the upper country, and calls for nurses are constant, but cannot be filled.

Dr. Byrd returned today from a trip to Squaw creek, and reports the situation there greatly improved. Most of the patients are convalescent and there are only a few who are real sick.

The epidemic is playing havoc with the attendance in the schools, among both pupils and teachers. High school attendance was, early in the week, almost alarmingly depleted, but is increasing and there seems to be no cases of serious illness. The problem of providing High school teachers was a difficult one. Prof. Godwin has taken double work and Rev. Jas. Adams consented to help out a few days; it is expected by next week the teaching force will be normal. In the grades, Mrs. Walter Brown is substituting for Miss Quinn who is ill, and Mrs. Karl Mann is filling the place of Miss Gruber, the latter remaining at home to care for Miss Quinn and Mrs. Gamage.
— —

Died

Mrs. Sidney Douglass, living in Circle addition, died this afternoon of pneumonia following influenza. The Douglass family were former residents of the Ola country.
— —

19200129EI3
Postpone Road Meeting
Prevalence of Flu and Bad Roads Make Change Advisable

No more forcible argument in favor of the good roads program in Gem county has been presented than this: That it has become necessary to postpone the good roads conference, to have been held Friday of this week, because of the almost impassible condition of the roads. The flu epidemic also was another factor.

The road committee has advised the Commercial Club that the meeting has been postponed indefinitely, as road conditions and sickness would prevent a general attendance from all portions of the county, which is very much desired.

source: The Emmett Index. (Emmett, Idaho), 29 Jan. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Emmett Index. January 29, 1920, Page 8

News of Gem County
By the Index’s Correspondents

Bramwell

The Davis Hunter family are all down with the flu. Lelia has been quite sick and under the care of Dr. Cummings, but is better at this time.

The Ed Heightsman family, who have had quite a siege of sickness are all up and around now.

School attendance is rather small this week, so many of the children being out on account of sickness.

Quite a number of folks went down to the river bridge Tuesday to see the big ice jam.

South Slope

The South Slope school is arranging for a school entertainment to take place on some date in February.

Letha

A doctor was called to the Henderson home last week. At this writing all the flu patients are up and on the road to recovery.

Dr. Cummings was called to Bismark Youtsler’s Friday and pronounced their trouble the flu. At present writing all in the family have had it except the baby. All are up, with the exception of Bismark and he is gaining fast.

Mrs. A. E. Pomeroy helped at Youtsler’s Friday, Saturday and Sunday. Mrs. Reese came down from Emmett.

Allan Newell has been helping with the chores at Youtslers for a week.

Mr. Gaines is doing chores for Dan Hansen, who is ill with the flu, as are all of his family.

Our school is quite small at present, down to 15 one day. When a teacher is used to 40 or more it must seem easy to handle 15.

Mrs. Wampler helped with the sick until Wednesday.

Dr. Polly came down Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday to see Mrs. Pomeroy, who is ill with the flu. She nursed her home folks, then was Good Samaritan to the neighbors and finally came down herself.

May and Chiles Riggs are recovering from the influenza.

The Ballenger family are up again after a siege of the prevailing epidemic.

Mrs. Lester Applegate was ill several days last week.

Mr. and Mrs. Kiggins came down from Emmett Tuesday, the latter prepared to stay and nurse her mother, whom she understood had the flu. She was agreeable surprised to find Mrs. Bott in her usual health, tho she and Mr. Bott had waited on Mrs. Henderson’s family through their illness.

The ice gorges in the river are the occasion of considerable apprehension to people on the low lands. The road to the bench is cut off because of the condition of the small red bridge, both approaches being washed out. A big gorge is lodged near the Burton place and another is reported to be following, having passed Emmett. The county officials have been blasting and breaking up ice about the Letha bridge for several days.

(ibid, page 8)
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Oregon Short Line Railroad, Victor, Idaho January 18, 1927

Victor1927Fritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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Idaho County Free Press. January 29, 1920, Page 1

19200129ICFP1

19200129ICFP2
Many Influenza Cases, But All In Mild Form, Is Doctor’s Opinion
Places of Amusement Closed and Public Gatherings Are Forbidden by Authorities
City Health Department Exerts Every Effort to Stamp Out Malady in Grangeville

Between sixty and seventy-five cases of Spanish influenza exist in Grangeville, but no person affected with the disease is in critical condition. This was the statement made Thursday afternoon by Dr. B. Chipman, city health officer.

Twenty families in Grangeville are under quarantine. Number of cases of illness in the families from one to nine. No pneumonia cases exist, said Dr. Chipman. Most cases of influenza are in mild form.

Cases Are Quarantined

Individual quarantine of families in which the disease prevails were determined upon Monday following a meeting of the board of health, local physicians, school and Red Cross heads, called by Mayor W. L. Campbell.

The public schools were closed Wednesday evening and on Thursday, on order of the board of health, all public gatherings were suspended, pool halls and the picture show were closed and every measure of precaution to prevent spread of the disease was taken.

More than 100 pupils were absent from the public schools the first three days of the week.

Statement To Public

Mayor Campbell and Dr. Chipman, in a joint communication to the public outlining measures for protection against spread of the disease.

“You can help by not attending public meetings, dances, or places of amusement until danger is past.

“By reporting all cases to the health officer.

“By observing strictly the quarantine if you are quarantined.

“By sending for your physician to advise and care for the patient.

“By moving along and attending to necessary business and occupations. Do not gather in public places. Stay at home.”

source: Idaho County Free Press. (Grangeville, Idaho), 29 Jan. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Idaho County Free Press. January 29, 1920, Page 6

Local News In Brief

Recovering — Mrs. Pat Toal of Mount Idaho is recovering from a severe illness which was for a time a matter of grave concern to her friends.

Federated Church — To be on the safe side and help to prevent an epidemic of influenza there will be no services next Sunday. H. S. Randall, pastor.

Court Postponed — Owing to prevalence of Spanish influenza, Judge Scales has postponed for one week the opening of the February term of district court in Lewis county. Court was scheduled to convene in Nezperce next Monday.

(ibid, page 6)
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The Daily Star-Mirror., January 29, 1920, Page 1

19200129DSM1

19200129DSM2
Influenza Spreads Over United States
Local Situation About The Same – Chicago Deaths increase – At Lewiston

The influenza situation is the chief topic of interest throughout the United States. The disease is spreading slowly but it is mild in most places. Comparatively few deaths are reported. There are a few very serious cases in Moscow and at least three more deaths are expected almost any time, but many of the cases are mild and some of those who were taken ill when the disease first appeared, are again out on the streets.

Mrs. Peter Sonna, mother of Mrs. S. E. Hutton, of Moscow, died at Los Angeles, California, this morning of pneumonia, following influenza, showing the disease is widespread. Chicago reports a marked increase in pneumonia cases, many deaths from pneumonia and influenza but the number of new cases of influenza has decreased rapidly and steadily since last Saturday, the high point of the wave.

Spokane has hundreds of cases and is fitting up an emergency hospital in the old skating rink. Every town, village, city and settlement in the west reports the disease increasing. Pullman has only about 100 cases but is preparing for the worst. Pullman had more than 100 deaths during the siege last year.

Lewiston is also fitting up an emergency hospital and three deaths were reported from there yesterday. The Lewiston Tribune of this morning says:

Three More Victims Yesterday

The need of the emergency hospital was brought to the attention of the officials yesterday with impelling force when it was learned that the two Lewiston hospitals are already filled to congestion and that there are many cases of influenza in the city that should be in hospitals where the care of trained nurses will be available. Three additional deaths in the city as a result of the epidemic caused the officials to take prompt action to provide the needed hospital facilities.

There were many new cases of influenza reported yesterday and the three victims of the disease were:

John Clinton Sherar, aged 54 years.
Gaylord Skinner, aged 15 months.
Mrs. Frances Stafford, aged 19 years.

There were five deaths in the city yesterday but the other two deaths were not caused by influenza.

The emergency hospital will be conducted by the Red Cross and all matters connected with its management will be in the hands of the Red Cross officials. Telegrams were sent out last night to secure the necessary equipment and it is expected the hospital will be in readiness to receive patients by the first of the week.

The Masons were more than willing to furnish their quarters for the care of the afflicted and the best of facilities will be available. There are about twelve large rooms on the two floors that can be devoted to hospital purposes. A complete kitchen is already in place and plenty of dishes are in the closets for all purposes. The rooms are all well heated, well ventilated and are served with hot and cold water.
— —

Mrs. S. E. Hutton’s Mother Called Home
Mrs. Peter Sonna, of Boise Died at Los Angeles Thursday A.M.

Word reached Moscow Thursday that Mrs. Peter Sonna, of Boise had died at Los Angeles that morning. The news came in a telegram from Mrs. S. E. Hutton, who was with her mother at the time. She asked that Moscow friends be notified. Mrs. Sonna’s death was due to pneumonia, following influenza. The funeral arrangements had not been made when the telegram was sent. …
— —

Chicago Has More Deaths

Chicago — (By A. P.) — Pneumonia, following influenza, reached the highest level of the present epidemic today. There were 407 new cases of pneumonia and 70 deaths reported. Influenza continued to subside, there being 87 deaths from influenza.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 29 Jan. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., January 29, 1920, Page 2

[Editorial Page]

Have Mercy On “Central”

There is merit to the appeal of the Moscow Telephone and Telegraph Company, published elsewhere in this issue to not call “Central” unless it is absolutely necessary. Nearly half of the operating force is sick. The girls are overworked. Those now working may be stricken at any time. They need assistance instead of being bothered by unnecessary calls.

If every one would refrain from calling “Central” or using the telephone except when absolutely necessary, those who have to use the system would get better service. This applies 12 months in the year, but especially is it true now. So many people call the telephone office to ask unnecessary questions.

The Moscow operators have always been very obliging and accommodating. They have given the best service possible and they never complain. They never have been uncivil in answering although there is no doubt they have had thousands of provocations.

In this time of distress, when homes are quarantined and operators are sick and the sick and the doctors have to use the telephone so much, let those who are not sick or quarantined or unable to get away from home, refrain from using the telephone except when absolutely necessary. If every patron will cut down his or her calls one or two a day (and not one of us but use the telephone unnecessarily at least that often) it will make a wonderful saving on the girls. Remember they are human and are working over time and if one or two more have to quit work the system will be demoralized. When the influenza wave is over you will feel better for having helped in this way and will get a better services.

(ibid, page 2)
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The Daily Star-Mirror., January 29, 1920, Page 3

City News

The American Legion is prepared to help any of their members or families who may be ill of influenza. If assistance is needed, telephone S. E. Mnoaham at 346 or 302Z.

Mrs. H. Kalinowski and daughter, Miss Madoline, arrived home today from Portland, called by the illness of Weldon Kalinowski.

(ibid, page 3)
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The Nezperce Herald., January 29, 1920, Page 1

19200129NH1

19200129NH2
District Court Be Postponed To Feb. 9
[Judge] Scales So Orders Because [of] Influenza Outbreak – Of [?] Cases Docketed, Six for Divorce

… influenza making its appearance in Lewis county during [the past] week, with a tendency … into an epidemic, Judge … Scales yesterday issued an … postponing the February … district court from the … the 9th, which order is as … [story cut off]
— —

19200129NH5Nezperce Has Return Of The Influenza
Two Families In Town and Several In Country Stricken – No Fatalities – Observe Quarantine; Schools Close

Until the first of the week this town had escaped the recurrence of influenza, while it had been making serious inroads in several neighboring communities, Kamiah, in particular reporting a large number of cases. Then reports coming from the surrounding farming section indicated that the malady had gained a foothold in at least four families. With this information at hand, and 1918’s sad experience still fresh in the memory of the community, it was decided to take steps to forestall as far as possible the spread of the disease here. County Attorney Pennell held a conference with County Health Officer Dr. E. Taylor, of Kamiah, the result of which was a visit to our city yesterday by the latter. After investigating the situation Dr. Taylor order the closing of the public schools and all public gathering places, and the cancelling of all contemplated public gatherings. This ruling has been strictly followed.

As The Herald goes to press late this evening, 16 defined cases of influenza are reported in town, these being in the families of L. J. Rowe, Roy Lyons, Mrs. Covey, B. F. Oakley, Frank Thompson and A. E. Wade. None of these are said to be serious and some are well on the way to recovery.

In the adjacent country cases are reported at the homes of John Gehrke, Clarence Eastman, Ed. Reed, Percy Marker, and Abel Newton. These are in various stages of the disease, but none seem to be extreme.

Frank Shaw, who was stricken with pneumonia five days ago, died at 5:20 this evening. He has been employed in the B. J. Fike garage here for some time, but his family is on a homestead in Montana, and funeral plans await the arrival of his oldest son, who is enroute. Little is known of him here. His was not an influenza case.
— —

Local News

In time of flu, “keep the mind and system open and the heart free from fear.”

Frank Shaw, an employee in the B. J. Fike garage in this city, was stricken with pneumonia five days ago and yesterday his condition was extremely serious, but he rallied and is said to be considerably improved today.
— —

J. M. Vorhies, who is visiting in the city from northeast of Greer, states the flu became epidemic in his neighborhood the first of the week, and the schools there – the Cottonwood district – which had an attendance of 72 last Friday, closed yesterday when the attendance had dwindled to 13.
— —

19200129NH4State Health Board Offers Flu Suggestion

Boise, Jan. 26. — This office urges that the communities not become alarmed, but calmly view the situation, assist the local officers by refraining from attending public gatherings, moving picture shows, dance halls, etc., as the foremost authorities on public health agree that these places are breeding spots for the transmission of the contagion.

For the protection of those members of the family who have not “flu,” when an inmate of their household is down, it is essential that all dishes and table ware be boiled. Here again the foremost medical men agree is the second chief avenue of the contagion. Keep the home properly ventilated and when coughing or sneezing be sure to cover the mouth and nose with a handkerchief. This is called “droplet infection” and the foremost medical men recognize it as an important avenue for the transmission of contagion.
— —

19200129NH3For Preventing Influenza

The Herald republishes the following article from its issue of November 7, 1918, by request:

Geo. P. Christenson submits the following as coming from a doctor with whom he was well acquainted back in his old home state and whom he knows to be capable and reliable:

Goldfield, Ia., Oct. 9. — Believing I have an effective preventative for grippe or influenza, and hoping it may be considered important enough to warrant publication, I herewith submit my remedy which I have used for years to my own satisfaction.

Let any one go to a drug store and buy a four drachm homeopathic vial and fill it loosely with absorbent cotton. Pour into this vial enough of the ordinary commercial 40 percent formaldehyde to thoroughly saturate the cotton. Stop the vial with a well-fitted cork and you have a remedy that will prevent or destroy any infection that is communicated by inspiration thru the air passages.

Respectfully yours, A. S. Cunningham, M. D.

source: The Nezperce Herald. (Nezperce, Idaho), 29 Jan. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Train Depot, Vollmer, Idaho

VollmerFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

January 30

The Rathdrum Tribune., January 30, 1920, Page 1

19200130RT1

Idaho State News Items

Influenza continues to invade new areas in Idaho, but the situation as a whole was somewhat improved Jan. 26, according to the state medical director at Boise. Out of over 1400 cases of influenza in the state since Jan. 8, only two deaths from influenza were reported, and five deaths from pneumonia.

A Nez Perce rural school district, joined with another to form a high school district, will not be permitted to withdraw therefrom, notwithstanding that the high school costs it $2700 annually, while only two students from the complaining district attend it. So ruled Attorney General Black Friday.

In a ruling on the Lewiston case, the attorney general and state superintendent declare a school district cannot legally issue bonds or deficiency warrants in payment of increases in teachers’ salaries in excess of the amount appropriated in the current year’s budget.

In a week’s work in Madison county, 345 cattle were tested for tuberculosis and no reactors were found.
— —

From Over The County

Coeur D’Alene

Complying with a request by the teachers for increased pay, the Coeur d’Alene school board granted a bonus of $100 to each teacher and the superintendent, and $50 to each janitor of the city schools, to be paid at the end of the term.

Post Falls

Owing to an oversight in fixing precinct boundaries the Washington Water Power island in the Spokane river and its inhabitants are not in any voting precinct. The condition was discovered by John Peters, census enumerator.

A. W. Klein, graduate of a diving school, repaired the water main in the Spokane river.
— —

World News In Brief

Inferior sanitary arrangements on the Russo-Polish frontier are said to be responsible for the alarming epidemic of typhus in Poland and the Baltic provinces. More than a million cases of the disease have been report to Red Cross officials.

source: The Rathdrum Tribune. (Rathdrum, Idaho), 30 Jan. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Oakley Herald. January 30, 1920, Page 6

19200130OH1

Local Mention

Any who would be willing to nurse cases of influenza are requested to leave their names with Dr. Nielson.

The health lecture at the opera house last Thursday was well attended and instructive. The lecture was repeated the following day for the benefit of the school children. Both the Academy and the public school dismissed to allow the students to attend.

Mrs. Rhea Jones has recovered from a serious illness of influenza and pneumonia.

Fred Van Wynen is recovering from an illness.

E. E. Stock’s baby, who has been very ill, is reported to be improving.
— —

Revolt and Plague at Moscow

Helsingfors. — Report from Dorpat say a revolt has broke out in the red garrison at Moscow, and that the people’s commissaries at Moscow have moved to Tver owing to the spread of the plague.

source: The Oakley Herald. (Oakley, Idaho), 30 Jan. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Clearwater Republican. January 30, 1920, Page 1

19200130CR1

19200130CR2135 Cases of “Flu” In County

One hundred and thirty-five cases of the influenza have been reported by the local physicians. Ten cases were found in this territory last Sunday, 19 on Monday, 39 on Tuesday and 68 all told up to Wednesday morning. Yesterday seven more cases were reported in Orofino and 60 in the Fraser district, bring the total to the astounding number of 135 cases. The flu seems to be of a light character and no deaths or pneumonia have been reported to date.

source: Clearwater Republican. (Orofino, Idaho), 30 Jan. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Clearwater Republican. January 30, 1920, Page 2

19200130CR3Fred De Bolt Dead
Young Man Succumbed to Pneumonia Following Influenza

Lewiston, Jan. 28. — Yesterday morning at the home of his sister, Mrs. Carl Porter, on Normal Hill, Fred DeBolt, a popular young resident of Lewiston, passed away, a victim of pneumonia that developed from an attack of influenza. Mr. DeBolt was taken ill on Monday, Jan 19.

The deceased, who was born at Moscow, was 20 year old on March 4, last. His parents, Mr. and Mrs. C. C. DeBolt, died a number of years ago and for the past six years the youth has made his home with Mr. and Mrs. Carl Porter at Juliaetta. When the Porters moved to Lewiston he accompanied them here and he has been an employee at the R. C. Beach company store. He is survived by Mrs. Porter, another sister, Mrs. Marsh Paine of Pendleton, and a brother, Frank DeBolt, who is an employee of the Hub store Lewiston.

The deceased was a member of the Woodmen of the World lodge and he served for a year in the marines during the war, being stationed at Galveston, Texas.

The funeral will be held Thursday afternoon from the Vassar chapel, Rev. J. D. Keith of the Presbyterian church officiating.

The people of Orofino will remember Fred DeBolt as a former student of the Orofino high school. He left Orofino to enlist in the Marines.

(ibid, page 2)
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Cottonwood Chronicle. January 30, 1920, Page 1

19200130CC1

19200130CC2Influenza Again Makes Its Appearance; No Serious Cases

The influenza epidemic, which last year cost the lives of thousands of young men and women and even elderly people has again made its appearance in various sections of the country, and this immediate section of the country is no exception. At the present time there are perhaps some 30 cases in the city and surrounding country, but as most of the cases are in a mild stage there is no great cause for alarm and of people losing their heads, as was stated by one of Cottonwood’s physicians. However the greatest caution should be taken by everyone to guard against the epidemic spreading.

None of the schools in the city have been closed with the exception of the high school which was dismissed Thursday morning on account of some of the teachers being absent and ill. On Friday morning 24 high school students out of 55 reported for work and as Superintendent Lustie and Principal Hannon were numbered among the sick the high school was again dismissed for the day.

Lewiston Hit Hard

Lewiston, perhaps is hit the hardest of any city in this section of the country, there being some 2000 cases reported in the city and the past four days, death has claimed about 15 patients of the disease.

No Flu at Nezperce

At Nezperce, where the flu last year claimed more deaths than perhaps any city in the state, according to the size of the town, so far it has failed to make its appearance. The city, however has taken every precaution possible by closing the city school, ordering pool halls to remove all chairs, and by also forbidding public gatherings of any kind.

Grangeville Quarantines

At Grangeville where there are some 70 cases the health authorities are quarantining every family afflicted with the disease. None of the cases there are considered critical.

Cottonwood’s physicians, Drs. Blake, Orr and Shinnick are practically working night and day to check the malady in its infancy and there advise it to keep cool and not lose your head. Do not expose yourself any more than is absolutely necessary and if sick go to bed and stay there, until all chances of a setback are entirely eliminated. Follow the advice of your physician and you will in nine cases out of ten come out of it in A No. 1 shape, if you should be so unfortunate as to contract the flu.

source: Cottonwood Chronicle. (Cottonwood, Idaho), 30 Jan. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Cottonwood Chronicle. January 30, 1920, Page 6

Watch Your Health

“Influenza” the disease that took hundreds, yes thousands of lives throughout the country last year has again made its appearance in various sections of the country and to be frank Cottonwood today is also again infected with the malady, but only in a slight form, there being some cases, however, where the patients have the disease in a more severe form.

There is absolutely no cause for alarm or scare. But likewise there is no reason for not exercising great precautions. The health should be carefully guarded.

Every cold should be attended to at once. The feet should be kept warm and dry. It is essential that no risks of an unnecessary nature be assumed. Remember to protect your health and there is no danger from influenza.

(ibid, page 6)
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Cottonwood Chronicle. January 30, 1920, Page 8

Cottonwood And Vicinity
Personal Mention and Local Happenings of the Week in This Vicinity

Mrs. A. J. Maugg, of Grangeville arrived in Cottonwood Friday morning to nurse Mrs. John Maugg and daughter Agnes who are afflicted with the flu.

Mrs. A. J. Barth and John Wasem departed Tuesday morning for Tammany, where they attended the funeral of their niece, Miss Louise Thiessen, a 19 year old girl who was one of the first influenza victims in that section of the country.

Bill Rooke, who came out from his ranch on the river last week and departed for Lewiston on a business mission is now detained there with an attack of the flu.

Wess Hockersmith received word Thursday that his wife, who has been waiting on an elderly lady at Lewiston whih whom she made her home during her childhood days, had taken down with influenza.

Dr. H. B. Blake was a professional business visitor at Vollmer Thursday.

Dr. G. S. Stockton of Grangeville was a professional visitor in Cottonwood Tuesday.

Miss Harriet Greve arrived home Wednesday evening from Lewiston where she has been attending the Lewiston State Normal, which has been closed on account of the flu.

Miss Hazel Miller and Miss Minnie Pfannebecker who are students of the Lewiston Business College returned home Thursday evening and will not return until the flu epidemic at Lewiston has passed over.

The basket ball game between Grangeville and Cottonwood high school, which was scheduled for Wednesday evening was called off on account of the influenza epidemic.

The Metro picture, “Sylvia on a Spree,” for Tuesday evening, February 3, has been cancelled on account of the flu epidemic through an order of the Metro corporation. The Orpheum.

There will be a Red Cross meeting at their headquarters on Tuesday afternoon, February 3. All members are requested to be present.

(ibid, page 8)
———————-

Navy Scientists

The source of the influenza illness remained a mystery to scientists as viruses were too small and obscure for the optical microscopes available in 1918. Credit: Naval Historical Society

source: American Experience (See Part 44 of the Idaho Influenza News – Yellow Pine Times)
————————

Further Reading

Study: Bacterial pneumonia was main killer in 1918 flu pandemic

By Robert Roos Aug 22, 2008

It was secondary bacterial pneumonia — not the influenza virus by itself — that killed most of the millions who perished in the 1918 flu pandemic, which suggests that current pandemic preparations should include stockpiling of antibiotics and bacterial vaccines, influenza researchers reported this week.

Experts at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) examined pieces of lung tissue preserved from 58 victims of the 1918 pandemic and reviewed reports distilled from thousands of autopsies to reach their conclusions, published online by the Journal of Infectious Diseases.

“Histological and bacteriologic evidence suggests that the vast majority of influenza deaths resulted from secondary bacterial pneumonia,” says the report by David M. Morens, MD, Jeffery K. Taubenberger, MD, PhD, and NIAID Director Anthony S. Fauci, MD.

Many accounts of the 1918 pandemic have emphasized how quickly patients succumbed to the infection, creating an impression that a large share of the victims died of the virus’s direct effects on the lungs or the immune system’s intense response to the infection. But the new report suggests that more than 90% actually died of invading bacterial pneumonia after the virus wiped out cells lining the bronchial tubes and lungs.

“In essence, the virus landed the first blow while bacteria delivered the knockout punch,” said Fauci in an NIAID news release.

Lung sections and autopsy reviews

The researchers pursued two strategies. First, they examined sections newly cut from blocks of lung tissue preserved from 58 military members who died during the pandemic, representing all known 1918 flu cases in a tissue collection at the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology.

Second, they reviewed 1918-era literature on influenza pathology and bacteriology, gleaning 109 reports providing useful bacteriologic information from 173 series of autopsies. These covered 8,398 autopsies from 15 countries.

Nearly all of the lung tissue examinations yielded “compelling histologic evidence of severe acute bacterial pneumonia, either as the predominant pathology or in conjunction with underlying pathologic features now believed to be associated with influenza virus infection,” including damage to the bronchial epithelium, the report says. Bacteria were often present in “massive numbers.”

In perusing the contemporary autopsy studies, the authors found 96 reports of lung tissue culture results from 5,266 patients, in which only 4.2% showed no bacterial growth. In 68 “higher quality” autopsy series, representing 3,074 patients, 92.7% of the lung cultures were positive for at least one bacterial species. Cultures of blood samples from another 1,887 victims were positive for bacteria in 70.3% of cases.

At the time of the pandemic, nearly all experts agreed that deaths were almost never caused by the then-unidentified flu virus itself, “but resulted directly from severe secondary pneumonia caused by well-known bacterial ‘pneumopathogens’ that colonized the upper respiratory tract,” the report states. The most common pathogens were pneumococci, streptococci, and staphylococci.

The authors also reviewed evidence from the relatively mild pandemic of 1957-58 and determined that most deaths were due to secondary bacterial pneumonia. In addition, the “few relevant data from the 1968-1969 pandemic” reflect the same pattern, they write.

“We believe that the weight of 90 years of evidence, including the exceptional but largely forgotten work of an earlier generation of pathologists, indicates that the vast majority of pulmonary deaths from pandemic influenza viruses have resulted from poorly understood interactions between the infecting virus and secondary infections due to bacteria that colonize the upper respiratory tract,” the report says.

Severity still unexplained

The researchers say their findings leave the extreme severity of the 1918 pandemic unexplained. Because they found evidence of many different types of invading bacteria, it was probably not due to specific virulent bacterial strains. Instead, they speculate that “any influenza virus with an enhanced capacity to spread to and damage bronchial and/or bronchiolar epithelial cells” could pave the way for bacteria in the upper respiratory tract to invade the lungs and cause a severe infection.

The authors suggest that, as in past pandemics, secondary bacterial pneumonia is likely to be the leading killer in the next pandemic — if it is caused by “a human-adapted virus similar to those recognized since 1918.” If that’s the case, they assert, pandemic preparations must go beyond the development and stockpiling of influenza vaccines and antiviral drugs; efforts should also include the stockpiling of antibiotics and bacterial vaccines to protect against bacterial pneumonia.

However, the investigators also write that if a derivative of the H5N1 avian flu virus causes a future pandemic, lessons from past pandemics may not be “strictly applicable.” That virus’s pathogenic mechanisms may be atypical because it is poorly adapted to humans and because it causes unusual pathology in animals. On the other hand, they say that if the H5N1 virus fully adapts to humans, the spectrum of resulting disease could revert to something more similar to what was seen in past pandemics.

Study may change thinking

William Schaffner, MD, an influenza expert and chairman of the Department of Preventive Medicine at the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine in Nashville, said the new study may change the general understanding of the causes of death in the 1918 pandemic.

“The general notion at least heretofore is that there were two kinds of deadly illnesses, the first caused by the virus all by itself,” Schaffner told CIDRAP News. “We know that the influenza virus can cause primary pneumonia, and the time course was so brief from onset to death in many patients that it was thought this was likely due to an extremely virulent influenza virus — an influenza virus on steroids.”

But it has also been assumed that bacterial pneumonia often complicated flu cases then, as it does today, and was fatal for many patients in that pre-antibiotic era, he added. “So the general notion was that there were two causes of death. The general sense was that the former, the virus, was more important than the latter. This comes largely from repeated stories about the rapidity with which this carried people off.”

But the findings of Morens and colleagues indicate that secondary bacterial pneumonia was the more common cause of death. “The impressive thing is, though this is a tiny, tiny sample of what went on, they showed bacterial pneumonia was extraordinarily common,” Schaffner said. “I think they make the point that it was in every one of the autopsy sections they examined. I have to tell you that made me sit up.”

He suggested one possible source of inadvertent bias in the study: Because the evidence is derived from autopsies, the subjects included in the study could represent a skewed sample. The victims most likely to be autopsied were those who died in hospitals, and they probably were less sick initially and had a longer course of illness than those who died at home, Schaffner said. Those who died at home were much less likely to be autopsied.

Nevertheless, the study is an important contribution for showing that bacterial pneumonia was common in the 1918 pandemic, Schaffner added. “I’m still not convinced that that bimodal concept [of the causes of death in 1918] is not true,” he said. “These fellows have nailed the second part; I’m just not sure they represent the entire population of deaths.”

continued: University of Minnesota Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy
———————

Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 1)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 2)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 3)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 4)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 5)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 6)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 7)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 8)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 9)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 10)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 11)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 12)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 13)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 14)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 15)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 16)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 17)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 18)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 19)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 20)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 21)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 22)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 23)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 24)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 25)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 26)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 27)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 28)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 29)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 30)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 31)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 32)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 33)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 34)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 35)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 36)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 37)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 38)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 39)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 40)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 41)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 42)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 43)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 44)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 45)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 46)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 47)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 48)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 49)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 50)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 51)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 52)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 53)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 54)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 55)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 56)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 57)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 58)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 59)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 60)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 61)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 62)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 63)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 64)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 65)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 66)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 67)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 68)

Idaho History Aug 15, 2021

Idaho 1918-1920 Influenza Pandemic

Part 68

Idaho Newspaper clippings January 23-28, 1920

Idaho photos courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

January 23 (continued)

Shoshone Journal. January 23, 1920, Page 1

19200123SJ1

19200123SJ2Flu Warning
To all Mayors, Women’s Clubs, Red Cross Chapters, Commercial Clubs

Influenza has appeared in six communities in the state. From all appearances it is the same infection we had last year and from the rapidity with which it is spreading, will tax the united efforts of all organizations, if it is to be controlled.

You are urged to organize in your community. Get together and map out a program for its prevention and control. Do not wait until the disease is present in your community in epidemic form.

Last year thousands of dollars were lost because it was necessary to enforce rigid quarantine. Your business men will suffer another loss if prompt steps are not taken to control the first case which appears in your community. Protection is possible, but depends on how vigorously you act. If you delay putting your shoulder to the wheel now, don’t howl if restrictive measures are applied when the disease gets a foothold in your community.

The Red Cross Chapter in your community has a plan completely mapped out for the handling of the situation. Get in touch with the Red Cross immediately. Study their plan and get together so that complete co-operation may be had from all organizations.

Yours truly,
Department of Public Welfare,
Ernest E. Laubaugh, M. D. Chief,
Bureau of Public Health Service.
— —

Dietrich – Besslen Notes

Miss Carrie Mathis was confined to her bed a few days last week with a severe cold threatening pneumonia.

Mr. and Mrs. S. S. King have been suffering with distressingly bad colds the past week, so severe as to almost raise the suspicion that it must be something worse than mere colds that does all the damage.

source: Shoshone Journal. (Shoshone, Idaho), 23 Jan. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., January 23, 1920, Page 1

19200123DSM1

19200123DSM2Chicago Flu Decreases

Chicago. — (By A. P.) — Influenza and pneumonia epidemic here continued to spread today. There is a slight decrease in the number of new cases reported and a considerable decrease is noted in the number of deaths in the past 24 hours.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 23 Jan. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., January 23, 1920, Page 4

19200123DSM3Nurses and Cooks Will Not Be Quarantined

So many families are coming down with influenza that if quarantine was enforced against cooks and nurses it would be impossible to get help for the sick. Therefore anyone who will help care for the sick, either by cooking or nursing will be put on the same basis as physicians and allowed to go to and from their homes if it will be necessary.

Dr. F. M. Leitch, City Health Officer.
— —

Edwin Allen Burr Is Dead At Mother’s Home

Edwin Allen Burr died at the home of his mother, Mrs. Newton Waters, on Orchard avenue, this morning. His death is due to pneumonia, said to be the result of influenza, but the doctor at Troy, who first treated him when he was taken ill at Felton’s mill where he worked, diagnosed the case as pneumonia and Glen Grice, undertaker, says the body shows no symptoms of “flu.” The young man was 27 years old. He was born in Latah county, his parents being pioneers. He is survived by his mother, two sisters, Mrs. Audrey Wilson and Miss Ruth Burr, and five brothers, Amos, Carl, Alvin, Leland and Rolland Burr. The burial will be at 11 o’clock tomorrow and will be private, as the family is quarantined.

(ibid, page 4)
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The Meridian Times., January 23, 1920, Page 1

19200123MT1

Teachers In Our Schools To Receive Living Wage

The Times thinks that discussion as to the advisability of raising the salaries of teachers, is unnecessary, for the simple reason that there can be no objection to paying them a living wage, based on the present cost of living. The idea of expecting a teacher to be well-educated and to impart the knowledge to our children, mix a goodly portion of patriotic American sentiment with the instruction, and to be a model in language and deportment for our growing youth, and at the same time receive a wage less than that of the janitor, or other person without previous training, is all wrong.

Everything the teacher buys has increased nearly 100 percent.

Here are the wages now paid:

H. E. Powers, Supt., Science, $2000; Anna E. Curtis, Prin., agriculture, $1300; M. Laravea Hand, Commercial, $1200; B. F. Shock, Manual training, $1260; Charity Simon, Home Economics, $1125; Josephine Numbers, English, $945; Jeanette Runciman, Mathematics, $945; Jessie Bradley, Arithmetic and English, (Jr. H.) $945; Cassie Palmer, Geog., Civ., History (Jr. H.) $810.

source: The Meridian Times. (Meridian, Idaho), 23 Jan. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Meridian Times., January 23, 1920, Page 6

Meridian News Notes

Ralph Allen, southwest of Meridian, is seriously ill with influenza.

Leroy Adams and family who have been quarantined with influenza, are improving.

Mary Frances, 2-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William L. Tingley, died of pneumonia Tuesday morning at the home of a friend at 1320 W. Jefferson street, Boise. The child had been ill but a few days.

Dwight F. Neal, the 5-months old baby of Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Neal, died Sunday evening. The funeral took place from the house Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock, Rev. C. A. Quinn officiating. Mr. and Mrs. Neal have the sympathy of the entire community.

Mrs. Nellie Masterson is recovering after a case of pneumonia.

Mrs. Clint Matlock is gradually improving in health, after a severe illness.

B. F. Shock as been duly installed by the school board to the position vacated by Howard Price as manual training teacher at the high school at a salary of $140 per month.

(ibid, page 6)
— — — — — — — — — —

Thunder City, Idaho 1912 [Long Valley]

ThunderCity1912Fritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

January 24

The Daily Star-Mirror., January 24, 1920, Page 1

19200124DSM1

19200124DSM2
Flu Epidemic Is Spreading Rapidly
Chicago And New York Report Marked Increase In New Cases And Deaths

Chicago — (By A. P.) — Influenza and pneumonia continued to spread here today with the highest death rate since the epidemic began. There are 2,513 cases and 101 deaths in the last 24 hours.

New York’s New Record

New York — (By A. P.) — A total of 2,361 new influenza cases reported here today as compared with 1,332 yesterday. There were 31 deaths from influenza, 10 more than yesterday.
— —

Nine New Cases at Spokane

Spokane. — Nine new cases of influenza were reported to the city health office today, the largest number so far reported this winter. Only two cases were reported during January before today. Precautions to check any possible outbreak of the disease will include a quarantine of every case reported, it was announced.
— —

Bad in Detroit

Detroit. — Seven hundred and sixty new cases of influenza were recorded by the city health office today, bringing the total up to 1,523. Deaths have been few.
— —

Increase at Baltimore

Baltimore, Md. — Eighty-seven new cases of influenza and 23 new cases of pneumonia were reported to the city health department today, an increase of that of yesterday.
— —

Fear Being Camp Infection

Washington. — Fear that influenza, now prevalent at Camps Grant, Custer and Dodge, and at Fort Sherman may spread to other camps and stations is expressed in the weekly army health report issued today by Surgeon General Ireland.

During the week ending January 16 influenza cases increased from 11 to 397. Pneumonia also increased. Fewer cases of influenza were reported among the American forces in Germany.
— —

Must Have More Nurses

An appeal is made for nurses to care for the sick. Conditions are becoming serious in Moscow. There are somewhere between 50 and 100 cases of influenza in town, it is claimed and the disease is spreading. So far as known none of the cases are serious and it is believed that with proper care they will recover rapidly. But they must have proper care if deaths are to be avoided. An appeal is made for persons to care for the sick. The University of Idaho needs them. The students have to be cared for. They are away from home and are in our care. It is a duty we own [sic] to them more than our home people. Any one who can nurse (it is not necessary to be a trained or graduate nurse, but to be able to care for sick persons) is requested to telephone Dr. H. J. Smith, chairman of the Red Cross, or Professor H. T. Lewis, who has charge of the housing of students. There are some families in town who need help but if the disease gets among the students who have no mothers to care for them, immediate assistance must be rendered. Dr. Smith has telegraphed to Spokane, Portland and other places for nurses but cannot get them and appeal is made for nurses from the homes in Moscow.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 24 Jan. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., January 24, 1920, Page 2

First Baptist Church
Corner First and Jackson
Dean Hamilton, Minister.

9:45 Sunday school with departments for all ages study the Bible with competent teachers and leaders. In line with the health officers instructions, we expect to have a doctor and nurses in charge to guard against influenza cases. All children of the grades and high school enter the building at the rear door on the north.

11:00 Morning worship with sermon by the pastor. “Was Christ Mistaken?” or “Do the Sick Need a Physician?” …

(ibid, page 2)
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Birds Eye view of Troy, Idaho ca. 1918 (1)

Troy1918Fritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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January 26

The Daily Star-Mirror., January 26, 1920, Page 1

19200126DSM1

Chicago Has 132 Flu Deaths

Chicago. — (By A. P.) — Today’s death toll for influenza and pneumonia were the highest since the epidemic began, City Health Commissioner Robertson reported today, but the total number of cases showed a marked decrease. New cases of influenza reported were only 1,058 and pneumonia, 250, as compared with 2,513 for both on Saturday. Influenza deaths today were 69 and pneumonia, 63, a total of 132, setting a new high record.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 26 Jan. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., January 26, 1920, Page 4

Hard Luck for Delinquents

State officials Wednesday clapped as [sic] rigid influenza quarantine upon the industrial school at St. Anthony and Dr. E. A. Bryan state commissioner of education and the highest executive officer in direct charge of the school, requested probate judges of every Idaho county to refrain from making additional commitments to that institution until the ban is lifted.

(ibid, page 4)
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Main Street Looking North West, Twin Falls, Idaho ca. 1915

TwinFalls1915Fritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

January 27

The Caldwell Tribune. January 27, 1920, Page 6

19200127CT1

Items of Interest From Surrounding Territory

Wilder News

Mrs. Oscar Keith has been assisting in the Walker Drug store during the illness of Manager Fred Walker, who is recovering from an attack of influenza.

Claytonia

The little baby girl of Mr. and Mrs. Tom Jackson that died on January 5, was buried in Caldwell the following Tuesday afternoon.

Mrs. Frank Norton was reported as quite sick from the effects of a cold last Sunday and Monday.

Grandma Andrews was a sufferer from cold on her longs last Sunday and Monday.

Lake Lowell

Little Hubert Weeks was quite ill with pneumonia the latter part of the week.

Dr. Gue was called to the Frank Weeks home Tuesday.

Fay Bussard was out of school a few days on account of sickness.

Everet Coon has been ill at the home of his parents, threatened with pneumonia.

Dr. Skaden of Caldwell was called to see little Hubert Weeks, who was very low with pneumonia on Thursday night.

Ten Davis News

Several of the school children have been ill the past week. Some have chicken pox, others mumps and some bad colds.

The Alturis literary society have a program at the school house Friday afternoon. As a number of the children who had parts were not there the program was short.

source: The Caldwell Tribune. (Caldwell, Idaho), 27 Jan. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Idaho Republican. January 27, 1920, Page 1

19200127TIR1

Last Year Closes With Best Record

The year 1919, despite its very unpromising beginning, closed with better health conditions than have prevailed during any year on record according to a report recently issued by a prominent insurance company. Between January and March, the United States and Canada were still feeling the effects of the wave of influenza. Many cities were having their worst attacks in those months. Based upon what happened after the epidemic of 1889, health officers expected a return of the influenza during the course of the year and a high death rate from diseases of the heart and kidneys. The country was full of persons who had been left weakened as a result of the influenza, and many of these were expected to die and thus increase the death rate. But the expected did not happen; beginning with the month of April and continuing each month thereafter up to the end of the year, mortality rates fell sharply below the average of the preceding years. The death rate of the summer of 1919 was unusually low, and the extraordinarily favorable record continued thruout [sic] the autumn. In fact, the death rates for the last quarter of the year instead of showing the marked increases usual for the early winter, were as low as some of the best summer and autumn rates on record. From the health standpoint the year 1919 has been one full of agreeable surprises.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 27 Jan. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. January 27, 1920, Page 2

19200127TIR2Send Out Letter Warning of Flu

According to a letter sent out by the state department of public welfare there is a possibility of another siege of influenza in store for this country. The letter, which warns communities to unite in preventing any spread of the disease follows:

“To all mayors, women’s clubs, Red Cross chapters, commercial clubs, etc.:

“Influenza has appeared in six communities in the state. From all appearances it is the same infection we had last year and from the rapidity with which it is spreading, will tax the united efforts of all organizations, if it is to be controlled.

“You are urged to organize in your community. Get together and map out a program for its prevention and control. Do not wait until the disease is present in your community in epidemic form.

“Last year thousands of dollars were lost because it was necessary to enforce rigid quarantine. Your business men will suffer another loss if prompt steps are not taken to control the first case which appears in your community. Protection is possible, but depends on how vigorously you act. If you delay putting your shoulder to the wheel now, don’t howl if restrictive measures are applied when the disease gets a foothold in your community.

“The Red Cross Chapter in your community has a plan completely mapped out for the handling of the situation. Get in touch with the Red Cross immediately. Study their plan and get together so that complete co-operation may be had from all organizations.”
— —

Taber

Mrs. Will Klinesner is quite sick at this writing.

Mr. Garl of Prairie Gem district was in Tabor Saturday. He reports a number of horses on the range near his ranch in bad condition. He did not think they were dry farmer’s stock, but apparently were horses from other counties being wintered here.

Goshen

The people of this locality are going to unite and fix the town well.

Wicks

Mrs. W. A. Park has been on the sick list the past week.

(ibid, page 2)
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Bonners Ferry Herald. January 27, 1920, Page 2

19200127BFH1

Flu Rages in Chicago

Chicago, Jan. 24. — Influenza cases reported at midday yesterday were but slightly more than the number for the previous day, but pneumonia cases in the same period showed a sharp increase. Influenza cases totaled 2,230, compared with 2,226 reported Wednesday. Deaths from the disease numbered 31. Pneumonia cases numbered 321 against 237 for Wednesday, with 45 deaths.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 27 Jan. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Bonners Ferry Herald. January 27, 1920, Page 4

Local Pick-ups

Mrs. T. J. Jones left Friday evening for Sweetwater, Idaho, where she will remain for several days with her daughter, Vera, who is confined to her bed with an attack of the influenza. Mrs. Jones reports that the patient is not seriously ill but will require careful nursing. Miss Vera was teaching in the Sweetwater school under supervision of the Lewiston Normal school which institution she has been attending during the past few months.

Loretta Takahara, the seven-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Takahara, of Priest River, died last Monday night at Sandpoint in convulsions. The attending physicians were baffled by her case. The funeral was held in Sandpoint Wednesday afternoon. Mr. and Mrs. Takahara were formerly residents of Lenia where Mr. Takahara, a Japanese, worked on the Great Northern section.

(ibid, page 4)
— — — —

Bonners Ferry Herald. January 27, 1920, Page 7

19200127BFH2Flu Is Coming, Warns State Health Officer
Mild Form of Epidemic Is Spreading Throughout Western States, Reports Show

Helena, Jan. 24. — After a study of the influenza situation for several weeks and by keeping in close touch with the progress it has made toward the western states, Dr. W. F. Cogswell, secretary of the state board of health, made a statement yesterday in the form of a warning against the return of the flu.

While Dr. Cogswell says the western progress of the influenza indicates that it cannot be hoped to escape a recurrence of it, he says it will appear in a mild form. He says that in the event of a recurrence, the number of deaths depended largely on individual conduct. He advised persons who develop colds to go to bed and remain there until danger of complications is over.
— —

Casper, Wy., Jan. 24. — With more than 125 cases of influenza reported in Casper to the county health officer, and two deaths in the last three days, further precautions as to prevention of the spread of the disease have been issued. All the cases are light.
— —

Fargo, N. D., Jan. 24. — There are more than 300 cases of influenza in Fargo, most of them developed in the last four days, according to reports at the city health department.

(ibid, page 7)
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The Daily Star-Mirror., January 27, 1920, Page 1

19200127DSM1

19200127DSM2
Influenza Status Remains Unchanged
No Orders Issued To Close Schools Or Other Public Gatherings In Town

Despite persistent and sensational rumors that the board of health has ordered everything closed tight, that pool rooms have been closed, that the schools are to be closed and that there will be no moving picture shows or other public gatherings, no such order has been issued. When it is issued, if it should be deemed necessary to close up everything, which is not now expected, the notice will be given in The Star-Mirror and not by runners on the streets.

All day sensational reports that drastic action has been taken have been circulated. Telephone calls have come to The Star-Mirror office and people have told what has been done, fully believing the wild rumors, or have asked if they are true.

A meeting was held this afternoon at which the matter was discussed. The Star-Mirror, which is the official paper of Moscow and the avenue through which people get their news, was promised a statement just as soon as the conference ended. Just before time to go to press The Star-Mirror was asked to state that “No order has been issued to close any business or school or church and if it becomes necessary to do this notice will be given.” It is said there are a number of new cases in town, a few are quite severe and cause much uneasiness, but on the whole the situation is quite satisfactory.
— —

Lewiston Closes Schools

Lewiston has been hit by the flu. A number of deaths have occurred, three being reported in this morning’s Tribune. They are Miss Ruth Darrow, prominent musician of Lewiston; Miss Louise Thiessen, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Gust Thiessen and Mrs. Laura El Harris. Of “flu” conditions in Lewiston the Tribune says:

Dr. Susan Bruce, city health officer reported last night that during the period from Friday night to noon yesterday 50 new cases of influenza had been reported to her office. While in nearly every instance these new cases were reported to be of mild character, during the day some cases of pneumonia developed, causing the fear that the epidemic may this season again take the form that it did last year, when so many cases of pneumonia resulted.

Yesterday the public school board held a consultation with the city health board and decision was reached to close the public schools. The school board decided on the action as the result of the fact that the membership of the classes is only about one-half the normal, so effective work cannot be done, as the pupils out of school upon return would have to be taken over the missed work. Ten of the regular teachers are also incapacitated by sickness. If the situation improves, school may be resumed next Monday, but there is no assurance that the session will be resumed for some time.

With Cases of pneumonia now developing from late cases of influenza, the health authorities are urging that people exercise all precautions.

Physicians state the damp, rainy weather is a factor that is included to encourage the epidemic.
— —

Chicago Sets New Record

Chicago. — Deaths from influenza and pneumonia for the last 24 hour period ending at 5 o’clock last night totaled 166. Influenza caused 86 deaths and pneumonia 80. During the period 1,616 new cases of influenza were reported and 467 new cases of pneumonia.
— —

New York Not Optimistic

New York — Despite the decrease in influenza cases reported today Health Commissioner Copeland was not optimistic over the situation last night as predicted from preliminary reports that there would be at least three thousand new cases today. He expressed the opinion however, that the death roll would not be materially increased. Yesterday’s report showed 1,712 cases as against 1,855 the day before.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 27 Jan. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., January 27, 1920, Page 4

Chicago Flu Deaths Increase

Chicago — (By A. P.) — New cases of influenza and pneumonia continued to decrease today but deaths increased. The number of deaths in the 24 hours ending at 5 o’clock today, were 173, of which 91 were influenza and 82 pneumonia. New cases of influenza reported are 1800 and 399 of pneumonia.

(ibid, page 4)
— — — — — — — — — —

Celebration at Tensed, Idaho

TensedFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

January 28

The Daily Star-Mirror., January 28, 1920, Page 1

19200128DSM1

19200128DSM3
General Quarantine Will Not Be Ordered In Moscow

That schools, churches, theatres and other places where people gather in numbers will not be ordered closed is the statement of Dr. F. M. Leitch, city health officer, supported by Mayor J. G. Gibson. Diligent inquiries have been made by both of these officials to ascertain the results of general quarantine in other towns and the consensus of opinion is that the closing of schools, churches and theatres, etc., has not lessened the number of cases nor lowered the death rate. Dr. Leitch has issued the following statement, which should be carefully read and the advice given should be heeded by all.

Influenza is an infectious disease. All infectious diseases will spread more rapidly through a community where people congregate in numbers and is best controlled by quarantine and closing places where people meet in large numbers and the matter of closing everything up has been seriously considered but after closely watching the development and progress of the disease now with us and also consulting with other physicians who have done the same thing there can be no question but what it is epidemic in character as well as infectious and there is no known method of controlling a disease that is everywhere in the air. If any one doubts the epidemic character of the disease please let them explain why whole families separated from each other by miles in the country and who have been in contact with no one are coming down daily. In fact the disease is said to be more prevalent in the country than in town. My own opinion is that nothing would be gained by closing up everything unless it might be a slower development of the disease through lack of infection by contact. The schools of Lewiston are closed, not by order of the health board but because so many teachers are sick the schools could not be carried on. If the schools be ordered closed here the pay of teachers will go on just the same with no pupil getting the benefit while if kept open at least a part of them can go to school. If so many teachers become ill schools can not be kept going they will automatically be closed. All of the uncomplicated cases of influenza have severe pains for a day or two but otherwise soon get over it if they will stay right in bed and care for themselves. Those who do not stay in bed are liable to more or less severe complications and possibly serious results. The fact that there has been more than 300 cases already in Moscow with only one death so far and that from a severe weakening of the heart and only a few other real severe cases should dispel any wild panic on the part of the people but none the less owning to the great difficulty in getting help to care for the sick no one should become careless or indifferent to the situation. I will not order the closing of schools or business places unless the disease assumes a more serious form from that now prevailing. Should the disease assume a more serious aspect every possible means to try to control it will be taken. I do advise that people stay away from all avoidable gatherings in order to prevent a more rapid spread of the disease by infection, stay at home as much as possible and on first symptoms of illness go to bed and stay there until it can be determined whether or not it is influenza. A strict quarantine of every known case will be maintained as required by law. Schools will remain open but under as close inspection as can be made daily. Churches and Sunday schools may remain open under the same careful inspection.

Owing to poor ventilation of picture show houses any of them admitting any school children unless inspected by a thoroughly competent person will be ordered closed to remain closed until the epidemic subsides. All public funerals where the person has died of influenza or other infectious or contagious disease are forbidden and all public funerals from any cause at present had better not be held. All dances and gatherings not absolutely necessary to be held should be discontinued as before notified.

F. M. Leitch, City Health Officer
— —

No Ad. Club Meeting

Owing to the flu situation there will be no meeting of the Ad. club this week. Due notice will be given of the time and place of holding the next meeting, which it is hoped will be the next regular meeting night.
— —

Don’t Lose Your Head

That Dr. Leitch and Mayor Gibson are right in their stand, or that the stand they have taken is endorsed by men prominent in the medical world, is shown from the following editorial from the Fort Sheridan Recall, published at Fort Sheridan, Illinois, which warns people against becoming unduly excited about the disease. The editorial follows.

“The flu is back”! Newspapers, rumor all the means of spreading information, are dinning the cry in our ears. At Fort Sheridan, thank Heaven, the panic is not evident. Here at least, calm measures are being taken to care for those few who have taken the disease, and to prevent others from taking it. And no one is worrying themselves sick over the possibility of getting sick.

We were assured by the most competent medical authorities that the epidemic would be here this year. As long ago as last February, the army medical authorities in the surgeon general’s office told us that the flu would be with us again. The public was warned; but the public, with its usual short memory, forgot. And when the disease reappeared, they became panic stricken. The army didn’t forget, the army was prepared, and the army isn’t panic stricken.

We were also assured at that time that the disease would be lighter in form this year. This has proved the fact. Such cases as have appeared are mild. Deaths are infrequent, instead of being the rule, as they were last year. No deaths have occurred at Fort Sheridan, to date, from influenza.

Last week’s Recall printed an article by the head of the medical service of this hospital telling what the army learned about the flu during the epidemic last year. Sure enough, no absolute cure was discovered; but enough was learned to enable us to take care of ourselves pretty well in the face of a mild epidemic such as is with us now in and about Chicago, and which will undoubtedly reoccur in lighter and lighter forms for a year or two more.
— —

19200128DSM2
Five Flu Deaths At Lewiston Tuesday
Situation In River City Is Causing Alarm – Asotin Schools Closed

Tuesday was a bad day for Lewiston, there being five deaths from influenza there during the day. The Lewiston Tribune says:

Pneumonia, following influenza, claimed five lives in Lewiston yesterday, this heavy toll following three deaths in the city Monday from the same cause. Also during yesterday many new cases of influenza were reported. Last night St. Joseph hospital reported accommodating 16 cases of influenza, in two cases pneumonia having developed. The White hospital reported 12 cases, in four of which pneumonia had developed of a severe form.

The deaths occurring yesterday were:

Fred DeBolt, age 20
Joseph Kavanaugh, age 33
Dorothy Weisgerber, age 3
Volly Kind, age 20
H. Downing, age 50

Dr. Susan Bruce, city health officer, stated reports continue to reach until the last few days the influenza and that the establishing of a quarantine is being carried out just as rapidly as conditions will permit. Up until the last few days the influenza cases had been quite uniformly mild, but the rainy damp weather developed, which undoubtedly encouraged the pneumonia stages now showing an increasing percentage.

Reports received yesterday show that the epidemic is general throughout all the surrounding country, though up to this time the death rate has been low. The course of the disease is now shown to be about the course it assumed last year. Last year the cases for the first few weeks were mild, gradually growing in severity as the epidemic spread. The communicable character of the disease is now admitted by all classes of practitioners and so the public is urgently warned to use all precaution possible against contagion.

Close Asotin Schools

Asotin, Wash. — Jan. 27. — The schools and churches have been closed on account of the influenza. The disease has not appeared in epidemic form in the Asotin section, but a number of cases have been reported and it was deemed advisable to take all possible precautions to prevent, if possible, the spread of the disease.
— —

Spokane Cases Increasing

Spokane. — Seventy-four cases of influenza were reported here today as compared with 32 cases on Monday and 58 during the preceding part of January. Most of the cases continue mild, with few pneumonia cases and only one death.
— —

Chicago’s New High Record.

Chicago — Deaths from influenza and pneumonia today established a new high record this winter, but new cases reported showed a decrease from yesterday’s total.

Deaths from influenza for the last 24 hours numbered 96, pneumonia caused 91 deaths. There were 1,378 cases of influenza reported today and pneumonia cases totaled 360.
— —

No change in General Condition

Washington. — (By A. P.) — There has been practically no change in the influenza situation over the United States during the last 24 hours. Slow but gradual increase in the number of new cases is shown in the reports from several states to the public health service today.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 28 Jan. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
————-

Further Reading

Unconventional Treatments Were Attempted During Spanish Flu Pandemic

April 7, 2020 Sean P. Duffy and Erin Rothenbuehler of Archiving Wheeling, the Ohio County Public Library in Wheeling.

Part 3: Cures, Preventives, Treatments and Folk Remedies

In addition to vague hopes that things like rain would somehow “purify the air,” businesses and people came up with a wide range of schemes and potions to stop the dreaded virus.

Nurses at Ohio Valley General Hospital reportedly wore masks “not unlike the gas masks used by the soldiers in France” while treating influenza patients at the hospital. This was confirmed in OVGH Superintendent Pliny O. Clark’s report to the OVGH board. Ordinary citizens were advised to wear gauze masks, which could be procured free of charge from the Red Cross.

Anti-expectoration and well-functioning bowels became something of an obsession, as this October 23 Intelligencer piece confirms:

“When a fellow spits or blows the mucous from his nose on the floor or sidewalk the germs soon become part of the dust of the air and will be breathed in by others. If you cough, sneeze or laugh in another man’s face you cause him to breathe your germs. Ventilate your sleeping quarters well. Avoid crowds because the air in crowded rooms just now is certain to contain the germ. Take plenty of exercise, keep bowels open and avoid all excess.”

At no point, however, in reading hundreds of articles about the Spanish Influenza in Wheeling’s newspapers or other sources, did we encounter the suggestion that people should simply wash their hands.

Local businesses like Baer’s Drug Store made efforts to contain the virus. Baer started using “sanitary paper cups” at its soda fountains, and local barbers were said to be considering the “wearing of masks.” The Wheeling Traction Company and West Virginia Traction & Electric Company started fumigating their street cars with eucalyptus oil every morning before the cars left the barns.

They also vowed to keep windows open during transit, though there seemed to be a few complaints about unopened windows.

In addition to national brands like Vick’s Vaporub (who suggested that nature combined with a good laxative and, of course, Vaporub, was the cure), bizarre things like Bulgarian Blood Tea (yes, Bulgarian Blood Tea) were said to help ease symptoms of the Spanish Flu.

Offered at local druggists like Griests, Coleman’s, Baer’s, Irwin, and Hoge-Davis, Nostriola brand balm or liquid was said to “open air passages” to keep an acute cold from somehow becoming an attack of Spanish Influenza.

Keeping the bowel open with calomel or saline draught was recommended, along with ten grains of Dover’s powder (an opium-based concoction used to induce sweating) at night.

Coleman’s drugstore promoted its own “Magic Balm,” which would “prevent and attack by keeping the nose and throat clean,” as well as its own “Antiseptic Solution” for gargling, as “the nose and throat are the seat of the infection for this dreaded disease.”

Meanwhile, Wheeling’s Nostriola Balm Company was pushing its “Mus-Tur-Pep,” a frightening mixture of mustard, turpentine, and pepper marketed as the best and surest way to relieve Grip pains. And C.H. Griest & Co. Druggists touted Phosphated Iron as a “blood tonic” to “Get the blood right.”

Dismissing the novelty of Spanish Influenza as just like “Old Fashioned Grip,” Dr. Hartman’s world famous Peruna anti-catarrhal boasted the ability to restore and maintain “a healthy condition of the mucous membranes” which, of course, was the best way to ward off Spanish Influenza. Another insidious ad disguised as a recommendation from the “Health Board” provided more dubious advice when it recommended running to the drugstore for a “Hyomei outfit” [another type of anti-catarrhal] consisting of a bottle of the pure Oil of Hyomei and a little vestpocket, hard rubber inhaling device into which a few drops of oil are poured.”

1918PerunaAd
Dr. Hartman’s world famous Peruna anti-catarrhal boasted the ability to restore and maintain “a healthy condition of the mucous membranes,” which claimed to be the best way to ward off Spanish Influenza.

Liquor sales jumped as temperance advocates blamed propaganda about “coffin varnish” being a powerful flu preventive.

Recommended disinfectants included exotic sounding herbal potions like perfume of carbolic acid, asafoedtida (a pungent member of the celery family also known as “stinking gum” or “devil’s dung”), and old fashioned formaldehyde.

On Oct. 11, a Pittsburgh based homeopathic physician named George F. Baer claimed to have experimentally discovered a successful treatment and “inoculation against the malady.” But Baer’s “preparation,” comprised of an odious sounding mixture of iodine and creosote, apparently failed to save the day.

Remedies were not limited to potions or concoctions. McFadden’s Men’s Store on Market Street advertised its thermal underwear line known as “Heavies” as “Influenza Armor,” based on the unscientific assumption that “body chilling” caused influenza. The same ad pushed the company’s “rubber footwear” line because: “There is danger in damp feet…Better wear rubbers than become an object of interest to undertakers.”

Industrial laborers, many of whom had habitually shared public drinking cups at work, began to carry individual folding drinking cups in their pockets–a wise move.

Home remedies included fried onions and sugarless, hot lemonade, which was touted as both therapeutic and patriotic.

We may find these desperate efforts and snake-oil myths amusing, but 100 years later, the desperate myth-making continues.

source: The Intelligencer. Weeling News-Register

Editor’s Note: This is the third part of a six-day series about the 1918 Spanish Flu Pandemic in Wheeling. It was written and researched by Sean P. Duffy and Erin Rothenbuehler of Archiving Wheeling (link), a collaborative community project of the Ohio County Public Library in Wheeling.
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Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 1)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 2)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 3)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 4)
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